Andrew and Martin Barber

Andrew Barber was born in 1840 in New York, the son of Robert (b. 1802) and Esther (b. 1808).

Robert was born in Ireland and Esther was born in Scotland. They eventually immigrated to the United States, and settled in New York state probably sometime in the late 1830s. By 1850 Andrew was living with Betsey Smith’s family in Verona, Oneida County, New York, just two houses from his parents. After spending some years in New York Robert moved his family westward and eventually moved to Michigan. By 1860 Andrew was working as a farm laborer and living with his family in Lowell, Kent County, Michigan. (Next door lived George C. Post who would also enlist in the Third Michigan.)

Andrew was 21 years old and living in Ionia County or in Lowell when he enlisted in Company D, on May 13, 1861; his brother Martin and another relative, Samuel Barber would also enlist in Company D . (Company D was composed in large part of men who came from western Ionia County and Eaton County.) Andrew was wounded in one of his legs on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, and admitted to Armory Square hospital, Washington, DC on September 1.

Sometime during the month of September Andrew suffered the amputation of his wounded leg, and he was probably still at Armory Square hospital when he died of vulnus sclopeticum (wounds) on September 22, 1862. He was buried in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldiers' Home National cemetery).

There appears to be no pension available.

In 1880 Robert and Esther were living in Lowell, Kent County, Michigan.

Martin Barber was born October 19, 1837, in Oneida County, New York.

His father Robert was born in Ireland and Esther was born in Scotland. They eventually immigrated to the United States, where they possibly met and married and settled in New York state probably sometime in the late 1830s. After spending some years in New York Robert moved his family westward and eventually moved to Michigan. By 1850 Martin was attending school and living with his family in Verona, Oneida County, New York. Robert eventually moved his family westward and settled in Lowell, Kent County, Michigan by 1860.

In any case Martin stood 5’8” with black eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion and was a 23-year-old farmer probably living in Ionia County when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861, along with his brother Andrew and another possible relative Samuel Barber, who was also from Ionia County. (Company D was composed in large part of men who came from western Ionia County and Eaton County.)

Martin was admitted to the general hospital at Newport News, Virginia, near Fort Monroe, on May 17, 1862, suffering from general debility and was transferred on June 12, presumably back to his regiment.

He was sick in the hospital in July of 1862, but had rejoined the Regiment by August when he was wounded in the left leg on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, and subsequently hospitalized at Emory general hospital in Washington, DC. He remained in the hospital until he was discharged for hemorrhoids at Camp Convalescent, near Alexandria, Virginia, on February 16, 1863.

After his discharge Martin returned to Michigan and settled in Lowell, Kent County.

He was married to Michigan native Martha E. Severy (1841-1907) on December 15, 1864, at Sturgis, St. Joseph County, and they had at least two children: Anna B. (1868-1891) and Louisa C. (b. 1877).

It is possible that they had a third daughter, Lulu, who was reportedly “seduced” at the age of 15 in 1888. On February 19, 1888, the Grand Rapids Democrat reported that one Sylvester Davis, was charged “with the seduction of a 15-year-old girl at Lowell, and who escaped from a deputy sheriff while hunting for bondsmen, has not yet been found and Deputy Sheriff Hill, whom he gave the slip, has offered $50 reward for his capture. His bonds are fixed in the sum of $1,000. The girl in the case is Lulu Barber, adopted daughter of M. C. Barber. The penalty under the new state law for his offense is 15 years in the penitentiary, as the girl is under 16, the legal age of consent.”

By 1880 Martin was working as a farmer and still living in Lowell, with his wife and two daughters. (In 1880 Robert and Esther were also living in Lowell, Kent County.) He was residing in Lowell in 1894 and indeed lived most of the his life in Lowell.

In 1880 Martin applied for and received pension no. 236,324, drawing $30 per month by June of 1905.

Martin was visiting or living in Detroit when he died of chronic bowel disease at about 10:00 a.m. on August 22, 1905, probably at 16 Hecla Avenue. His body was returned to Lowell where it was interred in Oakwood cemetery: old section no. 206; the headstone reads “Forever with the Lord”.

His widow was living in Detroit in September of 1905. She applied for and received a pension ( no. 599,657)