Charles S. and George R. Warren - updated 4/6/2015

Charles S. Warren was born in 1844 in Michigan, the son of Chancellor (b. 1810 in New York) and Laura A. Carolton (b. 1820 in Connecticut or Ohio).

Chancellor and Laura and moved to Michigan sometime before 1837. By 1850 Chancellor was working as a blacksmith and living with his wife and children in Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County where Charles and his siblings, including older brother George were attending school. Chancellor eventually moved his family to the western side of the state and by 1860 Charles was attending school in Grattan, Kent County.

Charles stood 5’6” with blue eyes, light hair and a fair complexion and was an 18-year-old farmer probably living in Kent County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company H on December 29, 1862, at Paris, Kent County or Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered the same day at Detroit. (His brother George had enlisted in Company A the previous year.) He joined the Regiment on January 22, 1863 at Camp Pitcher, Virginia, and was sick in the hospital in July. He was transferred, possibly as a Musician, to Company A, 5th Michigan Infantry upon consolidation of the 3rd and 5th Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

Charles eventually returned to Michigan after the war.

He was probably the same Charles Warren who was working in a paint (or pail) factory and living in Grand Rapids’ 2nd Ward in 1870 (his mother was also living in the 2nd ward in 1870). For some years he worked as a laborer.

Charles married New York native Mary Spencer (1851-1926), on February 8, 1874, in Denver, Newaygo County, and they had at least two children: Lydia (b. 1876) and Burdett (b. 1887).

By 1880 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife Mary in Denver, Newaygo County. By 1890 he was still living in Denver, Newaygo County. In 1900 he and his wife and two children were living in Hesperia village, Newaygo County.

He eventually settled in Battle Creek, Calhoun County where he was probably living in 1914 when admitted to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home.

Charles was admitted on April 30, 1914 to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 6645) in Grand Rapids and became a member of the Home Fife and Drum Corps. (His daughter Amy Koopman was living at 15 Indiana Avenue SW in Grand Rapids in 1914.)

In 1890 he applied for and received a pension (no. 741198). Charles died on September 1, 1917, in Grand Rapids, Kent County, and was buried in the Michigan Soldier’s Home in Kent County: block 6, row 4, grave 23.

His widow was living in Michigan, probably at the Home, in September of 1917 when she applied for and received a pension (no. 847056). Mary, too, was buried in the Home cemetery alongside her husband.

George R. Warren was born in 1837, in Michigan, the son of Chancellor (b. 1810 in New York) and Laura A. Carolton (b. 1820 in Connecticut or Ohio).

Chancellor and Laura and moved to Michigan sometime before 1837. By 1850 Chancellor was working as a blacksmith and living with his wife and children in Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County where George and his younger siblings, including brother Charles were attending school. Chancellor eventually moved his family to the western side of the state and by 1860 he was working a farm in Grattan, Kent County.

George was living in Grattan, Kent County, Michigan, when he married Emily McDonald on November 11, 1860, probably in Grattan; one of the witnesses was his father Chancellor.

George was 24 years old and probably living in Grattan (or in Grand Rapids) when he enlisted as Musician in Company A on May 13, 1861 (his younger brother Charles would enlist in Company H in December of 1862). He was wounded on July 2, 1863, at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, possibly while the Regiment was engaged in the Peach Orchard. By early July he was a patient in the general hospital at West’s building in Baltimore, Maryland, and was apparently soon afterwards transferred to Satterlee hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He remained absent sick in the hospital until he was mustered out on June 20, 1864, at Detroit.

After his discharge from the army George probably returned to Michigan and eventually settled in Mecosta County. (In 1870 his widowed mother Laura was living in Grand Rapids’ 2nd Ward; several of her children were also residing with her.)

Although it is not known what became of his wife Emily, George married Michigan native Julia A. Ford.

By 1880 George was working as a barber and living with his wife Julia in Grand Rapids.

In 1870 George applied for and received a pension (no. 113004).

George probably died sometime in the early 1880s, possibly in Mecosta County.

In February of 1884 Julia A. Ford Warren married Thomas Dougherty in Big Rapids, Mecosta County.

In October of 1890 Julia was living in Big Rapids, Mecosta County, when she applied for and received a pension (no. 314319). In 1892 Julia remarried to Gabriel Hemenway in Spencer, Kent County.