Germany

Felix Zoll

Felix Zoll was born May 19, 1832, in Ertingen, Riedlingen, Wurtemberg, Germany.

Felix left Europe in the late 1850s and came to the United States. Felix and possibly his older brother Fidelis arrived in North America in April of 1857, and eventually settled in Ohio.

He married his first wife Ohio native Elizabeth (1836-1872) in 1859, and they had at least three children: Ida or Ada (b. 1864), Mary (b. 1866) and Matilda (b. 1869).

By 1859-60 he was operating a boot-and-shoe store and living on the north side of Bridge Street between Front and Scribner Streets on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. In October of 1859 Felix joined the Grand Rapids Rifles, commanded by Captain Chris. Kusterer. (The GRR or “German Rifles” would serve as the nucleus for Company C of the Third Michigan infantry.) The following year he was reported as a bootmaker living with his wife in Grand Rapids’ Fourth Ward. (Curiously, there was also a Felix Zoll living in Union, Champaign County, Ohio in 1860.) By 1860 Felix and his wife were living in Grand Rapids’ Fourth Ward where he worked as a bootworker. (His older brother Fidelis was living in Ravenna, Muskegon County.) Just two houses away lived 19-year-old John Morgridge, who would join Company B in 1861.

Felix was 29 years old when he enlisted as Second Lieutenant in Company C on May 13, 1861, and was commissioned First Lieutenant on August 1, 1861.

In October of 1861 he was admitted to Georgetown Seminary hospital, suffering, he claimed in 1867, from typhoid fever, and on November 5, Dr. B. E. Thyer, Assistant Surgeon in one of the hospitals in Washington, DC, wrote to the War Department informing them that he had “carefully examined this officer and find that he has suffered from typhoid fever for six weeks, and that in consequence thereof he is in my opinion unfit for duty.” Since he could not recover his health “he was induced to resign and this was sole cause of such resignation.” Thus, on December 30, 1861, he wrote to Adjutant General Lorenzo Thomas, “I hereby tender my resignation as 1st Lieutenant 3d Regiment Michigan Vols. on the following ground: I have been sick and was in the hospital about three months, I have had leave of absence for 30 days, but returned to my duty. I feel that I am not able to bear the hardships of camp life any longer. I hope that my petition will be granted.” It was. Felix was released from military service on account of typhoid fever on or about January 3, 1862.

Felix eventually returned to Michigan and was living in Lisbon or Wright, Ottawa County in 1867 when he applied for a pension (no. 95,423), drawing $17.00 per month in 1897. By 1870 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife and daughters in Wright, Ottawa County; next door lived the family of John Zoll, possibly a brother. Felix probably remained in the Lisbon area through 1872 (when his first wife died), but sometime around 1873, he either moved to Havana, Ohio and remarried, or remarried and then moved to his second wife’s home in Ohio.

Either way, he married his second wife Frances Brown (1850-1936), on June 10, 1873, in Bismark, Ohio, and they had at least seven children: Andrew J. (b. 1874), Otto V. (b. 1876), Mary M. (b. 1878), adopted daughter Mary (b. 1880), Joseph (b. 1884), Pauline (b. 1887) and Carlos B. (b. 1893). By the end of 1873 Felix was living in Havana where he would spend the rest of his days. By 1880 he was working as a shoemaker and living with his wife and children in Havana, Ohio; also living with them was his 10-year-old stepson, Mathias Brown.

He was possibly still living in Ohio in 1897.

Felix died of paralysis on October 22, 1897, in Havana, Ohio and was buried on October 24 in Havana.

His widow applied for and received a pension (no. 475,616).

Albert Wustrow

Albert Wustrow was born in 1829 in Berlin, Germany.

Albert immigrated to America and settled in western Michigan sometime before war broke out.

He stood 5’8” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was a 32-year-old tinsmith probably living in Grand Rapids, Kent County when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861, crediting Grand Rapids. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.)

He reenlisted as Corporal on December 24, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Grand Rapids’ Fifth Ward, but listing his residence as Muskegon, nd was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864 and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February.

He was transferred as a Corporal to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864 and was reported absent sick in July. He was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After his discharge from the army Albert eventually returned to western Michigan. He was possibly the same “Albert Wustrow” who, in September of 1869, was beaten and robbed in Grand Rapids.

At a late hour on Sunday night last [wrote the Democrat on September 21] Albert Wustrow, a good and peaceable citizen, was attacked and brutally beaten by a couple of ‘roughs’ when in front of Mr. Kappenberger’s restaurant, where he boarded on Canal Street. He was struck by one of the villains a severe blow with iron knuckles, which cut a deep gash about two inches in length, from one of his eyes down his cheek. He bled frightfully, and was thought by Drs. DeCamp and Bienneman to be in a very dangerous condition yesterday morning. His symptoms were better last evening. After committing the crime, the men fled as rapidly as possible but the alarm being given they were followed, and one of them arrested and lodged in jail that night, and the other man was arrested yesterday morning and placed in the ‘lock up’. Officer Henry DeVries assisted by Officer Frank Heriman, Jacob DeVries and Mr. Bradley of the Bronson House are entitled to much credit for having followed the chaps until they were secured. The names of the men who have been arrested are given as John Coats and John Donnelly. They were taken before Justice Sinclair yesterday on the charge of drunk and disorderly, and on examination being found guilty, they were committed to the County jail in default of the payment of $9.25 each, fine and costs. We understand that an information has also been filed against the respondents, Coats and Donnelly, for assault with intent to kill.

Albert was living in Grand Rapids in 1874 and was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association. He listed his residence as Grand Rapids and occupation as tinker when he entered the Central Branch National Military Home at Dayton, Ohio, on January 20, 1877. He was still living in the Home in 1880.

Albert died, probably at the Home in Dayton, on either November 12, 1881 or December 12, 1882, and was buried in the Home cemetery in Dayton: section C row 7, grave 13.

Charles White

Charles White was born in 1842 in Baden, Germany.

Charles came to America and settled in Michigan sometime before 1863.

He stood 5’7” with hazel eyes, light hair and a fair complexion and was a 21-year-old book-keeper possibly living in Warren, Macomb County when he became a substitute for one George Gill who had been drafted on February 18, 1863, for 9 months from Warren. He was placed in Unassigned, and sent to the Regiment on March 6, 1863, but there is no record of his having ever joined the Regiment.

No pension seems to be available.

He may in fact have enlisted in Battery K, First Michigan Light Artillery on February 5, 1863, at Oakland County for 3 years (age 18), and mustered February 20. If so, he was transferred to the Seventh cavalry on February 20. Again, but again there is no further record, nor is there a record of his enlistment or transferal in the Seventh Michigan cavalry records. He may have then been a substitute for John Dropp who was drafted, and enlisted in Unassigned, Twelfth Michigan infantry on October 12, 1864, at Detroit for 3 years, age 21, mustered the same day. If so, he was then transferred to Company G at Detroit on October 14 for 1 year, and mustered the same day. Again, there is no further record. He may have enlisted in Company I, Fourth Reorganized Michigan infantry on August 25, 1864 at Pontiac, Oakland County for 3 years (age 21), mustered on September 8, and deserted at Pontiac on September 12, 1864. There is no further record.

Michael Welter update 10/18/2016

Michael Welter was born about 1834, in Germany or Luxembourg. In the spring of 1853 Michael left Germany and made his way to Antwerp, Belgium where he boarded the Adaline for America, arriving in New York City on June 3, 1853.

He was probably living in Ohio when he married to German- or Ohio-born Sophia Boehler (1835-1907), probably in Ohio, and they had ten children: Peter (b. 1856), Valentine (b. 1857), Mary (b. 1861), Henry (b. 1864), Lizzie (b. 1867), Michael (b. 1869), Joseph (b. 1871), Katie (b. 1874), Charles (b. 1877), Francis (b. 1880).

In 1860 Michael was working as a laborer and living with his wife and son in Tiffin, Seneca County, Ohio. Except for his service in the war, he would live in Tiffin all his life.

Michael enlisted as Corporal in Company B, 12th New York infantry at Syracuse, New York, on April 30, 1861, and was mustered in on May 13. For reasons unknown he was transferred to the Band of the 3rd Michigan Infantry on August 1, 1861 (or 1862). He was mustered out, probably “as a member of the Band and not as a musician,” on August 15, 1862, at Harrison’s Landing, Virginia.

Michael eventually returned to Ohio and was living in Tiffin in June and July of 1863 when he was listed in the draft registration records. He reentered the army in Company K, 107th Ohio Infantry, as a Private, on December 19, 1863, and subsequently transferred to Company K, 25th Ohio Infantry on July 13, 1865. There is no further record.

After the war, or after he left the army Michael returned to his home in Tiffin, Ohio. By 1870 he was working as a laborer and living with his wife and children in Tiffin’s 2nd Ward, Seneca County. Ohio. By 1880 he was working as a laborer and living with his wife and children in Tiffin, Ohio and he was still living in Tiffin, Ohio in 1890.

He applied for and received a pension (407406) for his service in the Ohio regiments.

Michael was probably living in Ohio when he died on April 25, 1892. He was buried in St. Joseph’s Cemetery, Tiffin, Seneca County, Ohio.

In May of 1892 his widow was living in Ohio when she applied for and received a pension (no. 359330). She was living in Tiffin, Ohio in 1900.

John Weber

John Weber was born in 1828 in Germany.

John left Germany and immigrated to America, eventually settling in Michigan sometime before 1863.

He stood 5’7’’ with blue eyes, black hair and a dark complexion and was a 33-year-old cigar-maker possibly living in Erin, Macomb County when he became a substitute for Frederick Christian Strickler who was drafted from Erin on February 17, 1863.

John subsequently enlisted in Company B and joined the Regiment on March 10 at Camp Pitcher, Virginia. He deserted September 8, 1863, at either Troy or New York City, New York, while the regiment was on detached service in New York state.

There is no further record. No pension seems to be available.

David Warner

David Warner was born on September 20, 1827, in Lindorf, Kircheim, Wurtemberg, Germany.

David emigrated from Germany to the United States and eventually settled in Illinois.

He was married to Wurtemberg immigrant Cecilia Standenmeier (b. 1829), in Chicago, Illinois, and they had at least five children: Barbara (b. 1855), Katie (b. 1857 and diedin infancy), Mary (b. 1858), twins Louisa and Alice (b. 1860, Louise died in 1912), and William (b. 1863).

They were living in Illinois by 1855 (when Barbara was born), and then moved to Michigan between 1855 and 1859 (when Mary was born). By 1860 David was working as a carpenter living with his wife and children in Grand Rapids’ Fifth Ward.

David had blue eyes, dark hair and a fair complexion and was 33 years old and living in Kent County, probably Grand Rapids, when he enlisted as a Musician Second Class in the Band on June 10, 1861. He was discharged from the Band on August 13, 1862, at Harrison’s’ Landing, Virginia, “as a member of the Band not as a musician.”

By 1870 he was working as a carpenter in Grand Rapids’ Fifth Ward and living with his wife and children. David and Cecilia were still living in Grand Rapids, on Gold Street, with their children in 1880. He was living in Grand Rapids in 1888, working as a carpenter and living at 55 Gold Street in 1889 and 1890 and at 257 Gold Street in 1912.

In August of 1887 David was probably living in Michigan when he applied for and received a pension (no. 393650). David was reported as a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association in June of 1911.

David was a widower when he died on May 2, 1920, in Grand Rapids and was buried alongside his wife in Greenwood cemetery, section F, lot 30.

Peter Wagner

Peter Wagner was born in 1844 in Nassau, Germany, the son of Christian (b. 1814) and Margarethe (b. 1824).

Prussian-born Christian and Margarethe were married in Germany and left Europe and immigrated to the United States sometime between 1844 and 1859 when they were living in Michigan. Peter’s family eventually settled in Detroit, Wayne County and by 1860 they were both living in Detroit, Seventh Ward. That same year there was one “Peter Wagoner,” age 17, a farm laborer living with and/or working for for the Slick family in Alpine, Kent County, on the western side of the state.

In any case, Peter was 17 years old and residing in Allegan County when he enlisted in Company C on May 15, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.) He was discharged for disability (cause unknown, but quite possibly consumption) on October 21, 1861.

Peter’s sister Margaretta would marry Andrew Kirschman, another member of Company C, in 1864.

Peter returned to Michigan and was probably living in Byron, Kent County when he reentered the service on December 30, 1861, as a private, for three years, in Company F, Fourteenth Michigan infantry and was mustered in on January 7, 1862.

He was mustered out of the service with the regiment on July 18, 1865 in Louisville, Kentucky.

After the regiment was disbanded in Detroit on July 29 Peter probably returned to his home in western Michigan. (There was one Peter Wagner, age 29, who enlisted in Company I, reorganized Third Michigan infantry, on February 20, 1865, at Grand Rapids, for one year, and was mustered the same day. He was discharged at the expiration of his term of service on February 16, 1866, at San Antonio, Texas.)

In 1878 he applied for a pension (no. 248277), but the certificate was never granted.

Peter may have been living in Detroit in 1880 (there was a 36-year-old Prussian-born baker named Peter Wagner living with his brother John B. Wagner in Detroit in 1880). He was probably living in Georgetown, Ottawa County when he was admitted to the Central Branch National Military Home in Dayton, Ohio, sometime before late 1883. (The Michigan Soldiers’ Home was not opened in Grand Rapids until 1885.)

He may very likely have been suffering from consumption and in fact he died from phythisis pulmonaria (consumption) at Dayton on December 25, 1883. Peter was buried that same day in Dayton National Cemetery: section D, row 14, grave 21. His father was living in Grand Rapids when Peter died.

William Von Wagner

William Von Wagner was born in 1829 in Braunschweig, Brunswick, Germany.

William was married Wurtemberg native Catherine (b. 1826) and they had at least two children: Mary (b. 1851) and Martin (b. 1859. William was living in Wurtemberg in 1851 and 1859, but eventually he and Catherine left Germany and immigrated to America, settling in western Michigan sometime before the war broke out. (He may have been living in Detroit’s Fourth Ward in 1860.)

He stood 5’6” with blue eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion and was a 32-year-old cigar maker probably living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.)

“William” was reported AWOL in August of 1862 and was tried by a court martial in September for having deserted for 12 days while the regiment was on the march to Centreville, Virginia. The regimental surgeon testified that he was sick with piles and had given him a ‘straggling pass.” He was found not guilty.

William was in the Regimental hospital in October. By April of 1863 he was sick in the Division hospital where he apparently remained through May, and was again sick in the hospital in August. He apparently recovered his health, however, and reenlisted on December 21, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Grand Rapids. William was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864 and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February.

He was shot in the left side on May 12, 1864, at Spotsylvania, Virginia, admitted to Douglas hospital in Washington, DC on May 16, and was transferred to Summit House hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on May 27, listing Charles Houbel (also of Company C) as his nearest relative. He was still hospitalized when he was transferred to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and remained absent wounded through April of 1865. He was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

He apparently returned to Michigan.

In 1870 William was working as a laborer and living with his wife and two children in Detroit’s Fourth Ward in 1870. William was still living in Detroit in 1880. He was living in Detroit around 1893 when he provided an affidavit in the pension application of Rolandus Freet who had also served in Company C during the war.

In 1868 William applied for and received a pension (no. 174808).

William reportedly died in Detroit and was buried in Elmwood cemetery.

His widow applied for and received a pension (no. 239970).

Frederick Teadt

Frederick Teadt was born in 1824 in Mecklinburg, Germany.

Frederick immigrated to America and had settled in western Michigan before late 1861.

He stood 5’2” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was a 37-year-old farmer possibly living in Kent County when he enlisted in Company B on November 19, 1861, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered on December 23 at Detroit. He was absent sick in January of 1862, and reported AWOL in August. He reenlisted on December 23, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, was subsequently absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864 and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February. He was transferred to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was mustered out on June 20 or July 5, 1865.

After the war Frederick returned to Michigan.

He was married to Maine native Almira or Mena (1834-1903), and they had at least two children: Jay (b. 1864) and Anna (b. 1870).

By 1880 he was working as a and living with his wife and children on Grand Rapids Street in Middleville, Barry County.

He was living in Middleville in 1883 when he was drawing $4.00 per month for rheumatism (pension no. 177,825, dated October of 1880).

Frederick was living in Middleville in 1884 when he attended the Sixth Annual Reunion of the Soldiers and Sailors, at Battle Creek, Calhoun County. He was living in Thornapple, Barry County in 1890. Indeed, he probably lived the remainder of his life in Middleville.

Frederick married his second wife Flora E., possibly in Middleville.

He was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association and G.A.R. Hill Post No. 159 in Middleville.

Frederick died July 28, 1913, in Middleville and was buried in Mt. Hope cemetery, Middleville.

Ernst Synold

Ernst Synold was born in 1842 in Germany, the son of Charles F. (b. 1810) and Mary or Maria (b. 1808).

His family immigrated from Saxe Gotha, Germany to America, settling in Michigan sometime before 1849. By 1850 they were living in Westphalia, Clinton County where Charles worked as a physician. By 1860 Charles was working as a physician and living with his wife and son Conrad in Lyons, Ionia County.

Ernst or Ernest stood 5’10” with dark eyes and hair and a light complexion and was 19 years old and probably living in Ionia County when he enlisted with his parents’ consent as First Corporal in Company E on May 13, 1861. (Soon afterwards his father enlisted, as a 45-year-old private in Company B, Sixteenth Michigan infantry in August of 1861.) He was wounded on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, but soon recovered and by July he was a color guard. Ernest had, for reasons unknown, been reduced to the ranks by the time he was wounded a second time on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run.

As of early October he was a patient in Presbyterian hospital in Georgetown, DC, and he was subsequently hospitalized through January of 1863. By the end of May he was present for duty with the regiment and was wounded a third time on November 30, 1863, at Mine Run, Virginia. He reenlisted as Sergeant on December 23, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Gaines, Kent County, was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864, possibly in western Michigan, and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February.

Ernest was wounded a fourth time on May 6, 1864, at the Wilderness, Virginia, and a fifth time on May 12, 1864 at Spotsylvania, Virginia, after which he was again hospitalized. He was still absent wounded when he was transferred as a Sergeant to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and remained absent wounded through July. He was reported as First Sergeant in January of 1865, promoted to Second Lieutenant of Company A on January 1, replacing Lieutenant Daniel Birdsall, and in May he was promoted to First Lieutenant, commissioned May 8, 1865, and transferred to Company K, replacing Lieutenant Franklin.

Ernest was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

Ernest eventually returned to Michigan.

He was married to Michigan native Mary (b. 1839).

His parents were living in Lyons, Ionia County in 1870. He was probably living in the upper peninsula when he acquired some 142 acres of land through the Marquette land office in January of 1877.

That same year Ernest applied for and received a pension (no. 160312). By 1880 he was working as a laborer and living with his wife in Menominee, Menominee County; his parents were also living in Menominee that year where his father continued to practice medicine.

Ernest eventually moved out west and by 1890 was living in Quilsene, Jefferson County, Washington.

Ernest died on October 2, 1925, in Hadlock, Washington.

John Stotts

John Stotts was born in 1841 in Germany.

John came to America and settled in Michigan sometime before 1863.

He stood 5’7’ with black eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion and was a 20-year-old baker possibly living in Westphalia, Clinton County when he became a substitute for Larow R. Ploughman who had been drafted on February 11, 1863, for 9 months from Westphalia. John subsequently enlisted in Company B, joined the Regiment on March 10 at Camp Pitcher, Virginia, however his enlistment bounty was recorded as forfeited for “attempting desertion.”

He was reported missing in action on May 3 at Chancellorsville, Virginia, and in fact had been taken prisoner on May 3, paroled on May 15 at United States Ford, Virginia, and returned to the Regiment at Sulphur Springs, Virginia. He allegedly deserted on September 3, 1863 at Troy, New York.

There is no further record. No pension seems to be available.

There was one John Stotts who was 19 years old when he enlisted as a private on June 7, 1864 in Company E, One hundred twenty-second Ohio infantry and was mustered the same day. He was taken prisoner on July 9, 1864 and paroled on march 20, 1865.

Henry Smith

Henry Smith was born in 1838 in Germany.

Henry, whose real name was probably Heinrich Schmidt, immigrated to America and settled in Michigan sometime before early 1863.

He stood 6’0” with dark eyes, fair hair and a light complexion and was a 23-year-old farmer possibly living in Warren, Macomb County when he became a substitute for Jacob Speer who had been drafted on February 17 or 19, 1863, for 9 months from Warren. Henry enlisted in Company D on March 4, 1863, at Warren for 3 years and joined the Regiment on March 10 at Camp Pitcher, Virginia. He allegedly deserted from the hospital near Potomac Creek on May 28, 1863 at Camp Sickles.

There is no further record.

Francis Smith

Francis Smith was born in 1840 in Germany.

Francis, whose real name may have been Franz Schmidt, immigrated to America and moved west, eventually settling in western Michigan by the time the war had broken out.

He stood 5’4” with gray eyes, light hair and a fine complexion and was a 21-year-old teamster probably living in Muskegon County when he enlisted in Company H on May 6, 1861. (Curiously, he did not join Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers. But rather he enlisted in Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.)

Francis was absent sick from July of 1862 through August, and allegedly deserted on September 21 at Upton’s Hill, Virginia. In fact he was discharged on September 2 at Portsmouth Grove, Rhode Island, for paraplegia resulting from a spinal injury.

Francis eventually returned to Michigan where he was living in 1881 when he applied for and received a pension (no. 442695).

He was eventually admitted to the Eastern Branch National Military Home in Togus, Maine, where died on September 26, 1901. He was buried in the Togus National Cemetery: west cemetery, section I, row 5, no. 8, grave 1713

Frederick R. Shriver

Frederick R. Shriver was born in 1833 in Prussia or Baden, Germany.

Frederick left Germany and came to America sometime before 1855.

He married Irish-born Mary Gillespie (1834-1874), possibly in New York, and they had at least two children: Frederick (b. 1855) and Mary Armina (b. 1859).

They were living in New York in 1855 but by 1859 had moved to Grand Rapids where Fred worked as a coppersmith for Foster & Metcalf; at that time they were living on the southside of Fountain between Bostwick and Ransom Streets.

In October of that same year Fred was elected Second Lieutenant of the Valley City Guard, the prewar Grand Rapids militia company whose members would form the nucleus of Company A. In 1860 he was a coppersmith living with his wife and two children in Grand Rapids’ Third Ward. (Two doors away lived the lumber dealer JeffersonMorrison; his son Walter would also join the Third Michigan in 1861.)

Fred was still Second Lieutenant of the VCG in June of 1860, and on December 3, 1860, he was elected First Lieutenant of the VCG.

Frederick was 28 years old and still living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted as First Lieutenant in Company A on May 13, 1861. He was commissioned Captain on August 1, 1861, and assigned to Company B, replacing Captain Baker Borden. He was wounded in the right arm on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, and on September 4 he requested a leave of absence to go home and recover his strength; Regimental Assistant surgeon W. B. Morrison confirmed the nature of his wound and also certified his request to go home on leave.

He was absent wounded until he resigned on account of disability on October 23, 1862. On October 23, he wrote from Washington, DC, to tender his resignation on account of enlarged veins in his right leg which had caused an ulcer and thereby rendering him unfit for service. And on October 25, W. B. Morrison, who was then Assistant surgeon for the regiment wrote that Fred was suffering from varicose veins of the right leg with ulceration. Indeed, Fred was honorably discharged on October 27.

After his discharge he settled briefly in Buffalo, New York, living with his brother, but in 1864 Fred returned to Grand Rapids where he lived the remainder of his life. He engaged in manufacturing plumbing fixtures, first as a coppersmith from 1865-66, living at 35 LaGrave Street, then as a foreman for the tinshop of W. D. Foster from 1867-69 and also working as a carpenter and living at 35 LaGrave. In 1870 he was back living with his wife and children in Grand Rapids’ Third Ward where he worked as a tinsmith and owned some $8000 in real estate. (Also living with them were Maggie and Bridget Gillespie; possibly Mary’s sister and mother respectively.)

Fred was working as a sheet metal worker and living at 33 Luce Street in 1874 when his first wife Mary died. The following year he married Ohio native Mrs. Mary Pennell Moon (1838-1912) on September 16, 1875, in Grand Rapids. “Capt. Shriver is married to Mrs. Moon,” wrote the Grand Rapids Democrat. “The ceremony came off very quietly on Friday night last. Both parties are in high favor in the community, and may consider themselves overwhelmed with congratulation.” (She had been married to one John moon in Oakland County, Michigan in 1855.) Fred was working in plumbing and steam heating and living in Grand Rapids in 1880 along with his wife and daughter Mary and his mother-in-law Maria Ferris who was the widow of William P. H. Ferris who had also served in the Third Michigan.

By the early 1880s Fred had gone into partnership with a Mr. Weatherly, to open Shriver, Weatherly & company which manufactured gas and various plumbing fixtures, with a salesroom at 62 and 64 Pearl Street. “The reputation of this firm,” wrote the Eagle on September 27, 1882, “for furnishing and doing fine work is not local simply but extends to all parts of the State. No better selection or parties better informed can be found. In addition to what is shown [at the County fair] they handle a full line of heating apparatus for hot air, hot water or steam heating. The finest residences of this city bear evidence of their workmanship and superintendence.”

Fred was living in Grand Rapids, Third Ward in 1883 when he served as a school trustee. In 1887 and 1888 he was living at 98 LaGrave Street, in the Third Ward in 1890 and 1894 and in 1907 at 270 Lyon Street in Grand Rapids.

He was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association and of Grand Army of the Republic Custer post no. 5 in Grand Rapids. In 1890 he applied for and received a pension (no. 247258), drawing $15.00 per month by 1906.

Fred was seriously injured in a sleighing accident on late Tuesday morning, February 5, 1907. According to one report, Fred had been trapped, noted the Grand Rapids Press, “beneath the body of a heavy bob sleigh while a team of maddened horses dragged him for a distance of nearly 300 feet.”Just before noon on February 5, Fred was

in the yards of S. A. Morman & Co., Wealthy Avenue and South Ionia Street. With one of his customers, Frank Roberts of Jenisonville [Ottawa County], Mr. Shriver had called to purchase a load of tile pipes. While these were being loaded upon the sleigh stood at the horses' heads holding lightly to the reins. The animals are but colts and a passing train caused them to rear suddenly and bolt. The unfortunate man was knocked down and as the vehicle passed over his prostrate body his clothing was caught upon the projecting box. In this manner he was dragged and bumped along through the Morman yards and into the yards of the Grand Rapids Ice company before the horses were finally captured. When removed from his position it was seen at a glance that he was probably fatally hurt. Both legs were broken and he was hardly recognizable.

He died of his injuries in the operating room at St. Mary's hospital in Grand Rapids.

The funeral service was held at the residence at 2:30 p.m. on Thursday, February 7. “Shriver,” wrote the Grand Rapids Herald, “whose tragic death Tuesday shocked a wide circle of friends, was eminently a good citizen. He came to Grand Rapids as a young man, enlisted in the war from here, and when peace was restored returned to enter upon a life of active business and usefulness. For more than 40 years he was identified with the city's business life and won the respect and esteem of the community by the exercise of those qualities which are admired in men. He was sterling in his integrity, staunch in his friendships and ever loyal to his public duty as a citizen.”

Fred was buried in Oak Hill cemetery: section K lot 42.

In 1907 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 627940).

George Schwegler

George Schwegler was born on January 28, 1840, in Mellingen or Erlinger, Wurtemberg, Germany, the son of Christian or Johann Jacob.

George immigrated to America, probably with his family and came to Manistee County, Michigan, in 1849 or 1852. He then moved to Muskegon County in 1856 or possibly 1858 or 1859, and, except for his military service, reportedly lived in Muskegon the rest of his life.

He stood 5’8’ with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was a 21-year-old laborer living in Muskegon County when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.)

George was reportedly wounded in July of 1861, but this cannot be confirmed. He was taken prisoner on June 30 or July 1, 1862, at Malvern Hill, Virginia, and confined at Libby and Belle Isle prisons in Richmond, Virginia, and was held for six weeks but soon exchanged. On August 6 the Richmond Dispatch reported that at

About 1 o’clock yesterday three thousand of the Federal prisoners on Belle Island left the city for “Varina,” (the farm of Albert Aiken, Esq., twelve miles from Richmond,) a guide having been procured from Capt. Alexander’s detective force to pilot them thither. They went under flag of truce to be exchanged, and were to be met by officers of the United States Army, empowered to effect that object. The party consisted wholly of soldiers, no commissioned officers being in the party. The guard attending the party was composed of a portion of the 42d Mississippi regiment, under Col. Miller. The prisoners were permitted to go by the C. S. Military Prison, and while in front of the building they cheered their imprisoned compatriots, (Generals and other officers,) and otherwise testified their respect for them. They appeared elated at the prospect of going home. The day was intensely hot, and it was intimated, after they had been gone for some hours, that many of them broke down, and had to be left on the way-side, while two or three died. There are 1,700 Yankees yet to go.

George may have been with that very detachment.

He rejoined the Regiment and was shot in the right hip and thigh on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run. On August 31 he was admitted to the First Division hospital at Alexandria, Virginia, and by the second week of September he was reported to be in the Mansion House hospital in Alexandria and “doing well.” He was discharged on November 24, 1862, at Alexandria, for “gunshot wound -- ball entering at neck of right femur, opening into and injuring the hip joint and was cut out at anterior lower third of thigh.”

George returned home to Muskegon and worked for a while as a raftsman, probably on the Muskegon River, and was drafted in September of 1863, but claimed exemption because of his alien status.

He married his first wife Norwegian native Tolerice (1845-1914) on November 3, 1864, and they had three children: George (d. 1867), Lucy (d. 1873, and a second daughter Lucy (with whom Tolerice was living in 1914; they may have had as many as nine children in all. (Tolerice immigrated to the US in 1850.) In any case they were subsequently divorced.

Notwithstanding his refusal to be drafted in 1863, George reentered the service in Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry on March 4, 1865, at Grand Rapids for 1 year, crediting Muskegon, and was mustered the same day. He joined the Regiment in April at Burkville, Virginia, and was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war George returned to Muskegon where he operated a hotel from 1868-72, served as city marshal for three years, and was deputy sheriff for four years. (He was probably working on the boom and living in Muskegon’s Second Ward in 1870.) It was also reported that he was a member of the city police orce for nine years and city marshal for three years. In any case, he returned to the hotel business from 1878 to 1882, and by 1880 he was operating a hotel on Ottawa street in Muskegon’s First Ward and living with his (second?) wife, Wisconsin native Bena (b. 1848). He may have opened a saloon in 1882.

He married his second wife Bavarian native Anna Bodendorfer (1850-1911) on September 8, 1885. She was the widow of one of George’s friends, William Bodendorfer, who had also served in the Old Third during the war. (Anna immigrated to the US in 1868.)

In 1890 he was living in Muskegon city. From about 1895 until his death in 1899 he ran a saloon at 1 Catharine street in Muskegon. He was also a liquor dealer.

George was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, the Grand Army of the Republic Kearny post no. 7 in Muskegon, the Germania Society and he received pension no. 126,694 (dated May 1875), drawing $6.00 per month by 1883.

George died of apoplexy at 7:45 a.m. on Saturday morning, April 29, 1899, at his home at 1 Catharine street, and the funeral was held at the residence at 3:30 p.m. on Sunday afternoon.

“The largest man in Muskegon,” wrote the Detroit Journal, “if not the state is George Schwegler, proprietor of a sample room” in Muskegon. He is 5’10” and weighs 350 pounds stripped. His waist measures 70 [inches]. Known as ‘Little George’ it was while acting as patrolman that he began to grow fleshy.” The Herald wrote that near the end of his life Schwegler had the reputation of being the heaviest man in the state. In 1895 “his weight reached the 400-pound mark, and it was about that time that he began to diet. His weight steadily decreased, until at the time of his death he only weighed 340 pounds. He was about 5 feet seven inches in height. Owing to his extraordinary size, 8 pall bearers will be utilized for his funeral and a special order was placed for the casket.”

George was buried in Oakwood cemetery in Muskegon: 2-21-8.

In September of 1899 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 528422). She was still living at 1 Catherine street in Muskegon when she died in 1911; she was buried alongside George in Oakwood cemetery.

Hans Schultz

Hans Schultz was born in 1830, probably in Germany.

Hans immigrated to America and settled in western Michigan sometime before the war broke out.

He was 31 years old and possibly living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.)

Hans was reported as sick in the Regimental hospital in August and September of 1862. He was mustered out on June 20, 1864, at Detroit.

Michael Schmidt

Michael Schmidt was born in 1832 in Ansbach, Bavaria, Germany.

Michael left Germany and came to America, possibly in 1852 or perhaps 1857 eventually settling western Michigan sometime before the war broke out.

He stood 5’3” with light eyes and hair and a light complexion and was a 29-year-old common laborer possibly living in Kent County when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.) He was discharged for consumption on July 27, 1861, at either Washington, DC or Arlington, Virginia.

After his discharge from the army Michael returned to western Michigan and eventually settled in Grand Rapids where he probably lived out the remainder of his life. (He may have been living with his family on Bridge street in 1880.) He was living in Grand Rapids in September of 1885 when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, and he was also a member of the German (presently Immanuel) Lutheran church on North Division and Michigan Avenues in Grand Rapids where he was still living in 1890. He was possibly the same Michael Schmidt working as a carpenter and living at 208 Scribner in 1889 and 1890.

In 1890 he applied for a pension (no. 874560) but the certificate was never granted.
Michael died of pneumonia at Butterworth hospital in Grand Rapids, on May 5, 1912, and the funeral service was held at 1:00 p.m. at his residence, 133 Brainard street, and at 2:00 p.m. at the German Lutheran church. He was buried in Oak Hill cemetery: section 1 lot 16. (The obituary incorrectly calls him “George” when it is in fact Michael who was buried in Oak Hill: 1-16 with a government stone that lists his service in the Old Third.)

Ludwig Frederick Schmidt

Ludwig Frederick Schmidt was born in 1823 in Wurtemberg, Germany, the son of Karl and Eva (Heinch or Heinich).

Ludwig may have come to America as early as 1830. In any case he was certainly in the U.S. before the Mexican War broke out since he allegedly participated in that conflict. He eventually moved westward and settled in western Michigan.

Ludwig was probably living in Grand Rapids, Kent County, when he married Wurtemberg native Paulina Hartman (b. 1838) on August 16, 1859, in Grand Rapids; and they had at least two children: Ludwig F. Jr. (b. 1863) and Emma (b. 1866). Paulina had apparently been married before and had a daughter Pauline (b. 1857) by the previous marriage. The service was performed by Rev. Francis Cuming who would eventually serve as the first chaplain of the Third Michigan infantry.

By October of 1859 Ludwig was living in Grand Rapids when he joined the Grand Rapids Rifles, commanded by Captain Chris. Kusterer -- who was also a witness at Ludwig’s wedding. (The GRR or “German Rifles” would serve as the nucleus for Company C of the Third Michigan infantry.) Ludwig (listed as “Frederick Smith”) was working as a blacksmith and living with his wife in Grand Rapids’ Second Ward; also living with them was 50-year-old Frederick Hartman, presumably Paulina’s father.

Ludwig stood 5’9” with brown eyes and hair and a dark complexion and was a 38-year-old blacksmith probably living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. He was discharged on either December 31, 1861, or January 1, 1862, at Fort Lyon, Virginia, for “varicose veins of five years’ standing.”

In January of 1862 he applied for and received a pension (no. 291730), drawing $2.00 in 1886, increased to $12.00 in 1892.

Ludwig returned to Grand Rapids, and by 1865-66 was working as a blacksmith and living at 10 Bronson street; in 1868-69 he living on the northwest corner of Winter and Shawmut streets, on the west side of the Grand River. In 1870 he was working as a blacksmith and living with his wife and children in Grand Rapids’ Second Ward. By 1880 Ludwig was still working as a blacksmith and living with his wife and two children in Grand Rapids’ Fourth Ward. (Next door lived August Schmidt who had also served in the Third Michigan during the war. August was born in Saxony.)

He was admitted to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 208) February 1, 1886, dismissed on June 5, 1886, readmitted November 25, 1891 and discharged at his own request on August 17, 1892. He was admitted to the Home for the final time on April 12, 1893.

Ludwig died of “old age,” chronic bronchitis and heart disease at the Home at 11:00 a.m. on October 7, 1905, and was buried in the Home cemetery: section 4 row 18 grave 2.

The week following his death his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 605876).

Christian Schmidt

Christian Schmidt was born on June 9, 1838, in Haddesheim, Germany, the son of Christian and Anna.

Christian (younger) immigrated to the United States in 1855 and settled first in Grand Rapids, Michigan, but moved to Muskegon, Muskegon County in 1856, and by 1860 was a fireman living at the same boarding house in Muskegon with George Root, William Ryan and Thomas Waters (all of whom would enlist in Company H).

He stood 5’11’ with brown eyes and hair and a dark complexion and was a 23-year-old laborer probably living in Muskegon when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.) Christian was taken prisoner on July 1, 1862, at Malvern Hill, Virginia, and confined briefly at Libby prison in Richmond, Virginia. he was quite possibly paroled on August 5. On August 6 the Richmond Dispatch reported that at

About 1 o’clock yesterday three thousand of the Federal prisoners on Belle Island left the city for “Varina,” (the farm of Albert Aiken, Esq., twelve miles from Richmond,) a guide having been procured from Capt. Alexander’s detective force to pilot them thither. They went under flag of truce to be exchanged, and were to be met by officers of the United States Army, empowered to effect that object. The party consisted wholly of soldiers, no commissioned officers being in the party. The guard attending the party was composed of a portion of the 42d Mississippi regiment, under Col. Miller. The prisoners were permitted to go by the C. S. Military Prison, and while in front of the building they cheered their imprisoned compatriots, (Generals and other officers,) and otherwise testified their respect for them. They appeared elated at the prospect of going home. The day was intensely hot, and it was intimated, after they had been gone for some hours, that many of them broke down, and had to be left on the way-side, while two or three died. There are 1,700 Yankees yet to go.

Christian was quite probably with that very detachment. (William Monroe was also paroled at Aiken’s Landing on August 5 and returned to the regiment on August 8 at Harrison’s Landing.) In any case, Christian returned to the Regiment on August 8 at Harrison’s Landing, Virginia.

Christian reenlisted as Corporal on December 21, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Grand Rapids, and went home to Michigan on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864.

While home on furlough he married Prussian-born Sophia Foegen (1845-1922) on January 22; they had at least five children: Mrs. Frank X. Vogel, Rhoda, Christian M., Frank J. and Andrew W. (In the 1870 census of Muskegon they are listed as: Mary, b. 1865; Magdalene, b. 1867, and a son, b. 1869.)

He was supposed to return to the Regiment on January 25, 1864, but, along with several other members of the Old Third on furlough in Grand Rapids, missed the special train out of Grand Rapids for Detroit and did not leave Grand Rapids until January 30. One of his traveling companions was Theodore Castor, a Sergeant in Company C, who many years later described that return journey:

We got to Detroit late in the evening and went to a restaurant close to the depot and ordered something to eat and while eating I picked on Christian Schmidt to go along with me after supper to get transportation for all of us and told the rest of the boys to be sure and stay there until we got back, so as to be handy in case we needed them. So after supper I and Christian we washed up and brushed up, put on our belts, cartridge box and bayonet, white gloves and collars and started up to Woodward Avenue to Colonel Smith's office. And arriving there where we were passed in the office and standing at attention, saluted the Colonel and I told him that I had a squad of men down at the depot and that I wanted transportation for them to Washington. When he got up and he stood right in front of me and I thought he was going to look right through me, and asked me for my authority and written orders. And when I told him that I never had any written orders and how the Captain in command of the Regiment had detailed me and my companion, Corporal Christian Schmidt at the time when the train was ready to pull out, to go back to town and hunt up the stragglers and report to Colonel Smith at Detroit. He said to me “I believe you are a straggler yourself.” But he asked me and Corporal Schmidt's name and rank and the number of stragglers I had down at the depot and told the clerk to write out an order to the Quarter-Master (I had been a little excited when he asked for the number of the men and I told him there were 18 when there were only 12 of us) for 18 men's transportation to Washington. And further told me that after I got done with the Quartermaster to start right out as there was a train going out at 12 o'clock and if the guard found us around there in the morning they would treat us as deserters. And I said yes to everything he said. When the clerk handed me over the order I felt somewhat relieved and went over to the Quartermaster's office on the same floor with lots of courage, and when I handed him the order he wanted to know who had command of the men and I told him that I had. He sat down and asked me my name and what office I held in my Company and when I told him that it was Sergeant of Company C, Third Michigan Infantry, he told me that the Third Infantry went through Detroit three or four days ago on a Special and that if we got out that night we might catch up with them. His plan was to get us out of town on the first train. I told him yes to every remark he made. He then went on to ask me every name of my command and after I had given him twelve I hesitated a second and when I couldn't think of any more right quick, I told him there were new recruits and I couldn't think of their names. So he put them down Recruits and handed me the big envelope with the transportation inside and told me to be sure and get started that night, and I felt as if I had won a great big battle.

Well, I and Christian went down to the restaurant to tell the boys the good luck we had and to get ready to start out, but found no boys there. They had left their guns and everything in care of the land-lord who had it locked in a room and they had told him they would be back after the theatre, and if we got there before they to wait. We waited until after mid-night when we made a bed on the floor and went to sleep. And when we woke up in the morning we waited again until about ten o'clock when some of them came. And as I and Christian didn't want to be caught on the sidewalk for fear of being arrested by the Provost Guard, I sent them back to hunt up the rest, and along sometime in the afternoon they all came in.

We all stayed at the restaurant until after dark when we slipped to the depot and left Detroit at 8 o'clock and got to Cleveland, Ohio in the morning where we got out and where one of our boys met his brother-in-law who entertained us all day and part of the night and showed us the sights of the city. We left there sometime in the night and got to Pittsburgh, Penn. next morning where we made another stop and where we were entertained by Professor Nagel -- a brother of Rudolph Nagel -- Sergeant of our Company and with us at the time. And at night left there for Harrisburg and had to lay over four hours and started for Baltimore, and when we got in the big depot found the Third Michigan with their special train side-tracked. We didn't want them to see us but our orderly Sergeant got a glimpse of us and he came over to our car and told us that we would have to join them and if we didn't he would report us as deserters. When I told him that I had command of those men and that I had orders from Provost Marshal Colonel Smith of Detroit, Michigan to report at Provost Headquarters in Washington, he let us alone. And we changed cars and soon started on and left them on the side track. When we got to Washington we went to a restaurant and ordered something to eat, and when I inquired of the landlord about the Guard he told me that we would be all safe, that they had just left and they wouldn't visit him any more that day. We spent our time between the restaurant and depot until some time in the night when the special came with the Third Michigan Infantry and we joined them, and never heard of any bad effects it would have on account of our traveling alone.

Christian was transferred to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He had been promoted to Sergeant by the time he was reported absent on furlough in January of 1865. He was absent sick in February, and mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war Christian returned to Muskegon where he lived the rest of his life. By 1870 he was working as a sawyer in the mills and living with his wife and children in Muskegon’s Third Ward. He became a city policeman and was working as a policeman from 1877 to 1882, and in 1889-90 was a constable living at 358 W. Clay Avenue in Muskegon. (He may have been the same Christian Schmidt who was proprietor of the Cincinnati House on 352 W. Clay Avenue.)

In 1890 he was Director of the Poor in Muskegon. He also served as a deputy marshal, was elected constable (possibly in the Seventh Ward) several times, served as supervisor of the Seventh Ward for two terms, and was a member of the supervisors’ committee on gravel roads.

He was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, and a charter (1879) member of the Grand Army of the Republic Kearny post no. 7 in Muskegon. In 1887 he applied for and received a pension (no. 449477, dated 1887).

Christian died of Bright’s disease at 4:20 a.m. on June 22, 1893, at his home at 358 West Clay Avenue in Muskegon, and was buried in St. Mary’s cemetery: B-4, in Muskegon.

In July of 1893 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 413019).

August Schmidt

August Schmidt was born on June 15, 1832, in Freiburg, Saxony, Germany, the son of August.

August (younger) immigrated to America and settled in Michigan in 1853, and before the war lived variously in Grand Rapids, Ionia, Ionia County and Holland, Ottawa County. In 1860 August was working as a carpenter and living in Ionia, Ionia County.

He stood 5’4” with hazel eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was a 28-year-old carpenter residing in Holland when he reportedly walked to Grand Rapids in order to enlist in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.)

He had been promoted to Sergeant by the time he was wounded in the right arm either on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, or August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run. In either case, he was subsequently absent in the hospital from August of 1862 and by early September was reported as a recent amputee in Carver hospital in Washington, DC. He was discharged on October 12, 1862, at Carver hospital, in Washington, DC, for loss of his right arm.

Following his discharge from the army August returned to Grand Rapids where he worked as a bookkeeper for the brewer Chris Kusterer from 1865-69, and was residing at 64 Kent street.

He married Prussian-born Josephina Rohlerage (1846-1929) on August 3, 1867 in Lowell, and they had at least one child, Walter K. (1868-1938).

By 1870 August was working as a saloon keeper and living with is wife and child in Grand Rapids’ Second Ward. By 1880 August was working as an insurance agent and living with his wife and son in Grand Rapids’ Fourth Ward. (Next door lived Ludwig F. Schmidt who had also served in the Third Michigan. Ludwig was born in Wurtemberg.) In fact August lived his entire postwar life in Grand Rapids, much of it in the Fourth Ward.

By 1889 August was working as an insurance agent and residing at 366 Ottawa street in Grand Rapids; by 1890 he was also working in real estate as well and still residing on Ottawa Street. He served several terms as constable and ward tax collector.

He was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, serving as its president in 1888, a member of the Grand Army of the Republic Custer post no. 5 Grand Rapids, a Democrat, and as a young man was active in German music circles such as the Arion Society. August was elected treasurer of the Valhalla Lodge no. 249 of the IOOF in January of 1882, and he was also a member of the German Arbeiter Society, the IOOF Lodge No. 249.

He was also actively involved with the German Veterans’ Association, and on September 16, 1890, the Democrat reported that

A score or so of German veterans of the late war met in the reading room of the Bridge Street House last evening for the purpose of making arrangements for a turn out on German day, October 6. Julius Fenger acted as chairman of the meeting and Julius Caesar as secretary. The following were appointed a general committee of arrangements: August Schmidt, Henry Schnabel, Julius Rathman, Julius Fenger [formerly of Company C], Ely Koehler, A. Rash, Frank Muhlenberg [formerly in Company C], Gustav Landau, Julius Caesar. Ward committees will also be appointed. The intention is to take part in the parade on German day. None but actual veterans of the war of the rebellion and native Germans will be permitted to take part in the parade, and these will be provided with special badges and will march under the United States flag. This is intended as an emphatic declaration of loyalty and patriotism of German citizens. There are about 200 German vets in the city. Veterans from out of town will also be invited to participate. The headquarters of the German Brigade will be at the Bridge Street House. Another meeting will be held next Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock at Arbeiter Hall to further perfect arrangements.

Schmidt provided an affidavit in the pension claim by Jacob Stegg’s widow. August provided an affidavit in the pension application of another former member of the Old Third, Mathias Baeker.

In 1862 he applied for and received pension no. 10,069, drawing $24.00 per month in 1883.

He died of valvular heart disease at his home at 366 Ottawa street in Grand Rapids on Saturday December 23, 1905, and the funeral service was held at the residence at 1:30 p.m. on Tuesday afternoon, December 26. He was buried in Oak Hill cemetery: section 8 lot 20.

The Herald observed that Schmidt “belonged to that progressive and sturdy element of German-Americans that has done much to develop the business growth of Grand Rapids and was honored and respected by all who knew him.”

In January of 1906 his widow was still living in Michigan when she applied for and received a pension (no. 608833).