5th Michigan

Robert Barry

Robert Barry was born on April 23 or 28, 1823, in Killarnock, Scotland.

Robert married Jean or Jane Kilpatrick (1822-1898) on June 6, 1845, in New Milne, Scotland, and they had at least eight children: Jeanette, Robert, Florence (1867-1867), John C. (1851-1887), Albert (1854-1921), Alfred E. (b. 1855), Margaret or Maryette (b. 1857) and Warren D. (b. 1859).

Two years after their marriage Robert, his wife and an infant child were just about to leave for America along with Jean’s family, John and Janet Kilpatrick and their children, when at the last minute Robert was taken ill with smallpox and remained behind in Scotland. Jean, their child and Jean’s family arrived first in Montreal, Canada, where the baby died, and Jean’s family moved on to Michigan. A year later Jean joined her family in Woodland, Barry County, Michigan, and shortly afterwards she was joined by Robert.

By 1850 the Kilpatricks had settled in Woodland, Barry County, where they worked a farm. (The Kilpatricks would remain in Woodland, Barry County.) One source reported that the Barry family settled in Kent County on a farm where they lived for about 12 years, and Robert then moved his family to a farm in Sunfield Township, Eaton County, where he would spend most of the rest of his life. In fact, however, Robert and his wife and four children were living on a farm in Sunfield in 1860.

Robert stood 5’9” with blue eyes, dark hair and a light complexion and was a 41-year old farmer possibly living in Sunfield, when he enlisted in Company E, on January 12, 1864, at Grand Rapids (or possibly Woodland) for 3 years, crediting Sunfield, and was mustered the same day. (It was the same company two of his relatives by marriage Andrew and James Kilpatrick had joined in 1861.) He joined the Regiment on February 1 or 10, and was transferred to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war Robert returned to western Michigan and lived most of his postwar life in Sunfield. By 1870 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife and several children in Vermontville, Sunfield Township and by 1880 he was living with his wife and child in Sunfield Township, working as a farmer. He was probably living in Dellwood, Sunfield Township in Eaton County in 1889, 1890 and 1891 and in Sunfield in 1894. He attended the Paris Exposition in 1880 the same year he visited his boyhood home in Scotland.

After his wife died in 1898 Robert went to live with his son Albert, who probably resided in Woodland. He eventually remarried Mrs. Lydia Mast, who died in 1903. Soon afterwards Robert went to live with his daughter, Mrs. F. P. Turner of Sunfield.

Robert became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association in 1891.

In 1891 he applied for and received a pension (no. 748923), drawing $12.00 per month in 1891 and increased to $27.00 per month by 1912.

Robert died, probably of arteriosclerosis, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. F. P. Turner, in Sunfield, Eaton County on February 21, 1913, and funeral services were held at the Kilpatrick church (probably in Woodland), on Tuesday, February 25, officiated by Rev. Jarvis of Lake Odessa. Robert was buried in Woodland Memorial Park cemetery, Barry County.

He left 15 grand-children and 3 great-grandchildren, and was remembered as a gentle man, particularly during his final years when he was suffering from the effects of a debilitating illness. “He always had a smile for everyone,” noted one source.

Cornelius Henry Barkhuff

Cornelius Henry Barkhuff was born 1817 or 1820 in Montgomery, Orange County, New York, possibly the son of William and Rhoda (Cummings).

If he was the son of William and Rhoda his parents were both born in New York and married sometime before 1812.

In any case, Cornelius married New York native Arvilla J. or G. (1827-1865), possibly in New York, and they had at least five children: Edgar A. (b. 1846) , Casper (b. 1849), William (b. 1853), Martha (b. 1854) and Willard (b. 1859).

Cornelius eventually left New York and by 1846 he had settled his family in Michigan. By 1850 Cornelius and his family were living in Albion, Calhoun County, with the Kesley family and where Cornelius worked as a laborer. By 1860 Cornelius was working as a farmer and living with his wife (who was blind) and children in Prairieville, Barry County.

Cornelius stood 5’7’” with blue eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion and was 46 years old and working as a farmer possibly living in Barry County when he enlisted in Company E on December 18, 1863, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Barry County; he was mustered on January 5, 1864, at Grand Rapids. Cornelius joined the Regiment on February 10, and was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan infantry Regiments on June 10, 1864, when he was reported absent sick.

According to his military service record, Cornelius was sent back to Michigan to recover his health and was a patient in the Detroit Barracks hospital when he was admitted with chronic diarrhea to Harper hospital in Detroit on October 13, 1864. Although reportedly returned to duty from Harper hospital on November 28, 1864, for reasons which remain unexplained he was in fact transferred to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and remained on the sick list until he was discharged on June 5, 1865 at Satterlee hospital, Philadelphia.

However, Cornelius claimed in 1885 that “after the battle of Spotsylvania [on May 12, 1864] on the march to Coal [Cold] Harbor in 1864 [he] was first sent to hospital at White House Landing, Va. It was a tent or field hospital [and he] was sick from chronic diarrhea and fever. [He] was transferred from there to Washington, DC, Lincoln Hospital [and] from there sent Harwood Hospital ward 7, I think. I was very sick for six weeks or more. I think I was from there sent to Philadelphia . . . to be treated for sore eyes [but] can't tell how long I was in that hospital. But was sent from there to Detroit Mich[igan] and was there treated for sore eyes was in Harpers Hospital think it was ward 4.” He further stated that from Harper Hospital he was returned to Virginia and sent to Camp Distribution, probably near Alexandria. He was again transferred to Harwood Hospital in Washington and back to Philadelphia where he was discharged as noted above.

Following his discharge from the army Cornelius returned to Michigan, probably to Barry County. He was probably living in Hastings, Barry County when he married his second wife, New York native Marian Mosher (1834-1917), and they had at least two children, Ada (1867-1939) and Nellie (b. 1869). (His first wife reportedly died while Cornelius was away in the army in 1865.)

By 1870 Cornelius was working as a farmer and living with his wife in Orangeville, Barry County. Also living with them were his two sons William and Willard, as well as two teenage siblings John and Alice Gillespie (possibly the children of Marian).

Cornelius was living in Prairieville, Barry County in 1873, when he testified in the pension claim of another former member of the Old Third, Reuben Babcock (also from Barry County). In 1880 he was reported as married and was living in Prairieville with the family of Jesse Chase, and working as a farm laborer. He resided in Hastings, Barry County where for some years where he worked as a farmer. Cornelius was living in Prairieville, Barry County in 1884 when he attended the Sixth Annual Reunion of the Soldiers and Sailors, at Battle Creek, Calhoun County. Interestingly he is listed with the Fifth Michigan infantry rather than those in the Third.

In May of 1889 Marian divorced Cornelius (she claimed he had deserted her) and he married for a third time, on January 10, 1893, to a widow by the name of Delia A. Thomas McCluer, in Hastings, Barry County.

He resided at various times in Orangeville, Barry County and in 1890 he was living in Richland, Kalamazoo County.

Cornelius was a member of G.A.R. Sackett Post No. 320 in Prairieville. In 1885 he applied for and received a pension (no. 346,844).

Cornelius was back living in Hastings where he died on May 13, 1898, and was buried on May 14, 1898 in Riverside cemetery, Hastings: block L-north, lot no. 74, grave northeast 1/4-1, having been removed from block G, lot no. 33.

His widow applied for a pension (no. 677036) but the certificate was never granted.

Frederick L. Barker

Frederick L. Barker was born 1843 in Oakland, Oakland County, Michigan, son of Jesse A. (b. 1820) and Caroline (b. 1821).

New York native Jesse and English-born Caroline (in Kent) were probably married sometime before 1843, possibly in New York or perhaps in Michigan. In any case they had settled in eastern Michigan by 1843 and Jesse may have been living in Manchester, Washtenaw County in 1845. They moved to the west side of the state, eventually settling in Green, Mecosta County, where Fred grew up on his family’s farm. By 1860 Fred was working as a farm laborer and lumberman and living with his family in Green, Mecosta County.

Fred stood 5’10” with black eyes, light hair and a light complexion, and was 18 years old and living with his family in either Green or in Big Rapids, Mecosta County when he enlisted with his parents’ consent in Company K on May 13, 1861. He reenlisted as a Sergeant on December 23, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Sparta, Kent County, and was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864. He probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February.

Although the details are sketchy, Fred was reportedly treated for syphilis from February 23 to March 5, 1864, and again on March 10, 12 to 21. In any case, he was sufficiently well enough to be on duty with the regiment and was shot in the right arm or shoulder on May 6, 1864, at the Wilderness, Virginia, resulting in the loss of the use of that arm. Fred stated in 1866 that “a musket ball passed through the right lung and shoulder shattering the shoulder blade & cutting the muscles & nerves in such a manner that the right arm hangs perfectly powerless & useless by the side.” He was subsequently admitted to Finley hospital in Washington, DC, on May 26 with a gunshot wound to the right shoulder, and was still absent in the hospital when he was transferred as a Sergeant to Company I, Fifth Michigan Infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was absent on furlough from June 25.

Fred returned from furlough on August 17 and although probably still absent wounded, in August he was promoted to First Sergeant, then to Second Lieutenant on August 12, 1864, and commissioned as such August 10, replacing Lieutenant Theodore Hetz. In fact, according to the Mecosta County Pioneer, Fred was promoted sometime in July. “The new Lieutenant,” wrote the paper on July 22, “was quite surprised to hear of his good fortune, as it was entirely unexpected. He has gone to Grand Rapids for the purpose of getting his furlough extended, we believe, as his wound yet entirely disables his right arm although improving.” The editor of the paper added that “We heartily congratulate Lieut. barker on his promotion, as it is an evidence that his services have been such in the army as to merit the compliment.”

In September he was still listed as absent wounded, but was present for duty the following month. In November he was reported as First Lieutenant of Company H, commissioned on October 14, 1864, replacing Lieutenant Winans, and promoted to Captain in February of 1865, near Petersburg, Virginia, commissioned November 7, replacing Captain Wakenshaw. He was mustered out of service on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

In 1865 Fred applied for and received a pension (19296?).

After the war Fred returned to Michigan and attended the Agricultural College in Lansing following which he went to Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, New York, where he took a commercial course (according to one report his parents sold a cow to help pay his tuition). He was living in Poughkeepsie in September of 1866. Fred quit school however and engaged in various businesses in New York and Pennsylvania.

He eventually returned to Michigan (his parents were living in Green, Mecosta County in 1870), probably in the late 1860s or perhaps early 1870s when he reportedly came to Big Rapids and opened up an iron works which proved to be less of a commercial success, and which failure caused his parents to lose their farm in Mecosta County. They eventually settled with Fred and his family in Crawford County probably in 1877 (he may have moved to Crawford the previous year). Fred eventually became deeply interested in timber lands in northeastern Michigan and was a member of a lumbering firm in Lewiston.

In 1875 he acquired 160 acres of land through the Traverse City, Grand Traverse County, land office and in 1881 another 80 acres through Reed City in Osceola County.

He was married to Michigan native May M. Hoskins (d. 1891) of Lansing on October 11, 1871, in Lansing, Ingham County, and they had at two children, Flora and Helen May (b. 1885).

By 1880 Frederick was working as a surveyor and living with his wife in Frederic, Crawford County. They were living in Frederic in 1885.

According to the Fifth Michigan infantry Regimental history Fred died on November 30, 1888, but in fact was living in Frederic, Crawford County in 1890. His wife May died in April of 1891 in Frederick and Fred was reportedly in Albert, Montmorency County in 1894. During the Twenty-third annual reunion of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association held on December 20, 1894, it was noted that he had died recently. Indeed, Fred died on October 12, 1894, in Grayling, Crawford County, “by wounds received in service,” noted one source. He was presumably buried in Grayling, or possibly in Big Rapids.

His daughter Helen became the ward of one C. B. Seymour of Crawford County, Pennsylvania (not Michigan). She received a minor’s pension (no. 418553).

Benjamin Elias Baker Jr. - update 8/29/2016

Benjamin Elias Baker Jr. was born October 3, 1835, in Fort Ann, Washington County, New York, the son of Benjamin Elias Sr. (b. 1805) and Arathusa (b. 1809).

Both New York natives, Benjamin Sr. and Arathusa were married in 1825, presumably in New York where they resided for many years. By 1850 Benjamin Sr. was working as a wagon-maker and had settled his family in Warsaw, Wyoming County, New York. Benjamin Jr. eventually left New York and moved westward, settling in Oakfield Township, Kent County, Michigan where he was working as a blacksmith and farmer by the time the war broke out.

He stood 6’0” with black eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion and was 26 years old when he enlisted in Company I on February 22, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered the same day. He was wounded on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, and subsequently hospitalized.

He eventually returned to the Regiment and in October was working as a company cook. He was on detached service at the Division hospital from November of 1862 (probably at Armory Square hospital in Washington, DC) through April of 1863, eventually returned to the Regiment and was present for duty throughout the remainder of 1863.

Benjamin reenlisted on February 26, 1864, near Culpeper, Virginia, and was mustered on February 29 at Culpeper, crediting Oakfield Township, which he also listed as his place of residence. He was subsequently absent on veteran’s furlough in March and April, and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of May and was transferred to Company I, Fifth Michigan Infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was listed as wounded a second time on August 15, 1864, and subsequently on detached service in September, probably at City Point hospital, and in February of 1865 was serving with an ambulance train. He was mustered out on July 5, 1865, near Jeffersonville, Indiana.

It is not known if Benjamin ever returned to Michigan after the war was over.

He did however return to New York and was probably living in Warsaw, Wyoming County where he married Priscilla Amanda Mattison (d. 1906) on August 13, 1865, (she was the widow of Robert Burke who was killed in action near Fairfax Courthouse, Virginia, in 1863) and they had at least four children: Benjamin E. (b. 1866), George W. (b. 1868), Edwin T. (b. 1869) and Mirty Dell (b. 1870).

In 1871 Benjamin applied for and received a pension (no. 148115). He was a member of the Old 3rd Michigan Association.

In 1870 Benjamin was working as a blacksmith and living with his family in Warsaw, Wyoming County, New York. He worked for many years as a blacksmith and lived in Warsaw, New York until about 1876 when he moved his family to Nebraska. By 1880 Benjamin and his family were living in Adams, Nebraska, and in Johnstown, Brown County, Nebraska in 1890. In 1892 he was living in Woodlake, Nebraska and in 1900 in Omaha, Nebraska with his wife and daughter Mirty. He may have left Nebraska sometime after 1901. In any case, by late 1910 he was a widower living with his son Edwin in Tacoma, Pierce County, Washington.

Benjamin was a widower and living (probably with his son Edwin) at 1624 E. 32nd Street in Tacoma when he died of apoplexy on April 29, 1919. He was buried in Tacoma cemetery.



William H. Baird

William H. Baird was born April 27, 1839, in Erie County, Pennsylvania, possibly Lake City, the son of William B. (b. 1810) and Mary (b. 1811).

Pennsylvania native William B. married Massachusetts-born Mary, possibly in Pennsylvania, but in any case they were living in Pennsylvania by 1836. They eventually moved westward and between 1839 and 1841 settled in Ohio. By 1850 the family was living in Willoughby, Lake County, Ohio where William B. worked as a carpenter and William H. attended school along with two of his siblings. William B. moved his family westward again, settling eventually in western Michigan by 1860 when William was working as a farm laborer and living with his family in Nelson, Kent County.

William stood 5’7” with blue eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion, and was 22 years old when he enlisted in Company K on May 13, 1861. At some point prior to the mid-summer of 1862 he was detached to the Third Brigade as a teamster, a position he would hold until the end of the war. In July of 1862 he was serving in the wagon trains a teamster and he also worked as a saddler, probably in the Brigade trains. By January of 1863 he was detached at Brigade headquarters, in September he was with the First Division supply train, and the following month he was back on detached service with the Third Brigade where he remained through November.

William reenlisted on December 23, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Walker, Kent County, was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864 and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February when he was again reported as a teamster at Brigade headquarters. From March through May he was serving with the wagon trains. He was still on detached service when he was transferred to Company I, the Fifth Michigan Infantry (although the Fifth lists him as from Company H, Third Infantry), upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and by November of 1864 he was on detached service as a nurse at City Point, Virginia hospital, and in December he was with the Quartermaster department. He served as a teamster until he was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war William returned to Michigan.

He was married to Michigan native Sarah (b. 1854), and they had at least three children: Elmer (b. 1870), May or Mary (b. 1874) and John (b. 1876).

He later claimed that he resided in Montcalm County after the war for about ten years, then in Nelson Township, Kent County for four years, Lakeview, Michigan ten years then to Lake City, Michigan and from there to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home in 1908.

William possibly lived briefly in Grand Rapids, but was living in Crystal Springs, Montcalm County when he lost two fingers in a sawmill accident in 1866. Apparently he put his foot against a log he was sawing and when the log turned over his foot gave way and as he stuck out his hand to ease his fall, he lost two fingers from his right hand which was caught in the saw. He and Sarah were probably still living in Crystal in 1870, as his father William. In any case, by 1880 he was working as a laborer and living with his wife and three children in Nelson, Kent County. By 1888 he was residing in Sylvester, Montcalm County, and in February of 1890 he was skidding logs for Harvey Borst in Hinton, Mecosta County when he broke his left knee in a logging accident.

He was probably residing in Lakeview, Mecosta County in 1890, in Sylvester in 1891 and probably in Hinton in 1894. According to a statement he gave in 1909, from 1865 to 1876 he lived in Crystal Springs, Montcalm County, in Cedar Springs, Kent County, from 1876 to 1880, in Lakeview, Montcalm County from 1880 to about 1900, in Lake City from 1900 to 1907 when he was admitted to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 4929) on February 18, 1907. he was living in the Home in 1920.

William was a member of Grand Army of the Republic Macomber Post No. 141 in Lakeview, Mecosta County, was a Protestant and he received pension no. 631,482, drawing $50.00 in 1920.

William died a widower, at the Michigan Soldiers’ Home on January 16, 1921, at 1:30 p.m. of mitral insufficiency, and was buried in the Home cemetery: section 7 row 15 grave no. 22.

James Babe

James Babe was born July 4, 1839, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Peter and Mary.

Both of James’ parents were reportedly born in Pennsylvania, and presumably married there. In the mid-1850s James left Philadelphia and moved to Elmira, New York where he worked for some five or six months on the Williamsport & Elmira Railroad, but by late 1857 or early 1858 he had moved west to Jackson, Jackson County, Michigan where he worked briefly in a livery stable. From Jackson he moved to Kalamazoo and worked for several weeks for Henry Dake at the Dake Hotel. some years later James claimed that he couldn’t make any money in Kalamazoo, so he settled on the old Widoe farm near the Taylor plaster mills outside of Grand Rapids, afterwards moving to Cascade.

He was living in the Grand Rapids area in 1858 when he was arrested for larceny on November 23, 1858, and was found guilty. He was sentenced to a $10.00 fine or 30 days in jail. The Enquirer reported that “Babe not being able to raise the ‘tin’ was marched over to the Cross Bar Hotel”. Babe remarked 18 years later that he had never been to prison and was in jail but once “for drunkenness and stealing. That was the only crime I was ever arrested for, except for a family quarrel, when I choked my father-in-law and brother-in-law.”

By 1860 James was working as a farmer and living in Grand Rapids.

He stood 5’7” with hazel eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion and was 21 years old and probably still living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company A on May 13, 1861. George Miller, also of Company A and a tentmate in the winter of 1861-62, described Babe as “a jovial fellow”, a comrade “who, ever since the battle of Bull Run, when he hears anything said about cavalry, pretends to be awfully scared and commences to tremble all over, and by his odd motions keeps us laughing continually.” Babe was detailed as Brigade saddler on August 11, 1861, and was serving as a Brigade teamster on December 31, 1861. He was still detached as a Brigade teamster from July of 1862 through July of 1863, and in November he was with the Third Brigade (which included the Third Michigan) still working as a teamster.

James reenlisted on December 23 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Grand Rapids, and was subsequently absent on a 30-day veterans’ furlough. Curiously, he was reported to have married Malina Gorham on December 15, 1863, in Ada, Kent County, thus placing him in Michigan before he reenlisted and therefore before he would have been allowed to go home on veteran’s furlough. Nevertheless, they had at least one child, a son John. James probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February and was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan Infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, where he continued to serve with the Brigade wagon trains through December.

In January of 1865 he was absent on furlough, and in February he was transferred, probably as a teamster, to the Quartermaster department where he remained until he was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war James returned to the Grand Rapids area and, according to a statement he gave in 1876, settled on a farm in Cannon, Kent County where he remained for nearly a year, before moving to Grand Rapids where he lived for a few months before moving to Rockford, Kent County. He then worked for about 18 months at George French’s shingle mill in Cedar Springs, Kent County, after which he returned to the plaster mills near Grand Rapids. His wife left him sometime around 1872, “because”, he claimed some years later, “her folks coaxed her away.”

He was living in Grand Rapids in 1874, and at one point had served as a deck hand on the river steamer Nebraska under Captain Moran who would later become the chief of police of Grand Rapids. In 1875 he was employed by Jeremiah W. Boynton in the construction of the Grand Rapids & Reed’s Lake railway, and when that was completed he worked on the line as a conductor until the close of the season when he was then employed in constructing the west side line of the road and drove a car on that line after its completion in late April of 1876.

On May 16, 1876, James was arrested in Conger, a station on the Grand Rapids & Indiana railroad line just north of the Kent County line, and was charged with arson. It was alleged that Babe and two other men were hired by Boynton to burn Boynton’s flouring mill in Alaska, Kent County, in mid-September of 1872.

According to the Eagle of May 17, 1876, There were some suspicious circumstances connected with the fire, but not enough to warrant the officers in proceeding at that time to an arrest for incendiarism.” The chief of police undertook surveillance of several individuals and “Later, one James Babe, who had been in the employ of Manager J. W. Boynton, on the Reed’s Lake Street Railway, in various capacities, happened, in conversation with an acquaintance, to suggest incendiarism as a means for relieving himself of financial difficulties [with the mill], and that he would attend to such a job for a consideration. From such hints he dropped, his acquaintance was led to believe that he had attended to such work before and knew how to act.

Babe’s friend informed the police and it was decided that the friend would continue to press Babe on additional details regarding the burnings. During further talks with Babe it was learned that he had in fact burned the mill at Alaska as well as a dwelling in Lockwood. Chief Moran took the train north of Grand Rapids a few miles to Conger where he found Babe and arrested him.

James confessed right away and told Moran that Fayette McIntyre, whom he knew from Alaska and “with whom he was boarding in Caledonia, approached him and offered a chance to make some money if he could keep a secret. He said he could, when McIntyre said that J. W. Boynton had offered him $200 for burning his grist mill [in Alaska], to enable him to get the insurance, and that, for reasons he explained, he could not set the fire; that if he, Babe, would do it he should have half the money, or $100; that he gave him, Babe, instructions, and the bargain was consummated and the mill burned.” Furthermore, Babe alleged that he had struck another bargain with Boynton to burn a piece of property in Lockwood, from which Boynton collected $1,000 and that he was to pay Babe $75 or $100. That property was burned in 1874. Chief of Police Moran arrested Jeremiah Boynton and LaFayette McIntyre, “two local, well- respected citizens”.

During his testimony on May 17, 1876, Babe said, in part, that McIntyre approached him because

he was liable to fainting spells and feared he might be attacked with one of them and thus be burned up in the mill. He said the mill must be burned soon -- I think within a week. Subsequently -- I think two days later - he asked me if I would burn the mill, and said if I would not he must do it himself, as the job must be done. He told me it [the mill] was fixed for burning, where there were empty barrels, a can of oil, etc., for starting the flames, in the mill, that I should not try to save anything, and that Boynton would be at the Rapids, and it must be done while he was there. I told him the night before I burned it that it would be done. I found the empty barrels mentioned under the grain spout where they weighed the grain, and the kerosene oil in the upper part of the mill. There was nearly a gallon of the oil. I entered the mill about 11 o’clock at night, I think it was Saturday night, set the fire, and then hurried home as fast as I could with the empty oil can. I went to bed and slept until morning. Afterward he [McIntyre] paid me $40, coming to me in my field where I was husking corn, and said that he got it of Boynton, and that it was a part of the $200 which Boynton had agreed to pay him for the job. Afterward he gave me $20 more, and the balance of $40 was applied on board, as my children and I were boarding at McIntyre’s” (his wife having just recently left him).

On July 1, 1876, McIntyre was found not guilty. His attorney argued that if indeed he was involved with the burning of the mill, he did so with the consent of its owner, Boynton, and Judge Hoyt ruled that Boynton had the full “‘use and occupation’” of the mill. “It was not arson,” read the opinion, “for a man to burn his own uninhabited building, or to hire another to do it, unless the act was done with the intent to defraud, and the information did not allege such intent.”

James, however, was found guilty but with extenuating circumstances, and apparently served no time in jail.

By 1880 James was listed as a widower and working as a fireman in a mill in Grand Haven, Ottawa County, a curious job for one convicted of arson. In any case, that same year he was living in the Eighth ward with the family of Henry Johnson. James eventually left Michigan and moved south. By 1890-91 he was working as a laborer and living at 262 Lafayette in New Orleans, Louisiana. He was still in New Orleans when he applied for a pension in August of 1892, through an attorney in Kansas City, Missouri; he claimed to be suffering at the time from a right inguinal hernia. The pension was re-filed in New Orleans in July of 1894, reopened in May of 1895 and rejected, no reason being given.

By late fall of 1897 James was still residing in New Orleans when he resubmitted his pension application, and he was living in New Orleans in early 1898 when he was at last awarded a pension (no. 982,043), at the rate of $6.00 per month, dated February of 1898; by 1900 it had been increased to $12.00 per month.

By 1900 James had returned to Michigan and may have resided briefly in Corning, Allegan County before he entered the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 3473) on October 10, 1900. He worked as a laborer most of his life, and listed himself as a widower when he entered the Home.

James died at the Home on January 18, 1903, of organic pulmonary heart disease, and was interred in the Home cemetery: section 4 row 14 grave no. 38.

Reuben Babcock

Reuben Babcock was born about 1829 in Washtenaw County, Michigan.

Reuben’s parents were both reportedly born in Michigan. In 1830 there was one Henry Babcock living in Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County and in 1840 John, Joshua, William and S. D. living in Washtenaw County. In any case, Rueben eventually moved to the western side of the state and by 1850 was living with Canadian-born Martin Babcock (possibly an older brother or cousin) and his family on a farm in Prairieville, Barry County.

Reuben married New York native Margaret (b. 1831) and they had at least four children: Lois (b. 1852), Hiram (b. 1854), Herbert (b. 1856) and Martha (b. 1858).

In 1856 Reuben was still living in Barry County when he acquired 40 acres of land at the Kalamazoo Land Office. By 1860 he was working as a farmer and residing with his wife and four children in Orangeville, Barry County. Next door lived Canadian-born Sophia (b. 1810) and 20-year-old George Babcock (possibly also born in Canada) and next door to them lived Martin Babcock and his family.

Margaret died in June of 1861, and Reuben married Michigan native Cynthia L. Nichols (b. 1845) on June 5, 1862, in Kalamazoo, Kalamazoo County.

Reuben stood 5’8” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion, and was a 36-year-old farmer living in Orangeville, Barry County when he enlisted in Company E on January 29, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Muskegon, Muskegon County and was mustered the same day. He left Michigan to join the Regiment on or about February 10, 1864, but suffered a severe leg injury in a railway accident shortly after leaving Grand Rapids. He was boarding the train in Ionia when he injured one of his ankles. Apparently he attempted to board the train while it was in motion and “he hit his ankle against the step, which injured the bone.”

He made it to Virginia, however, and upon joining the Regiment at Camp Bullock, near Brandy Station, Virginia he was sent to the Regimental hospital. According to Dr. James Grove, who was then serving as surgeon for the Third Michigan, upon examining Reuben shortly after he arrived in camp, he found “a severe contusion of left leg lower third, the limb being at the time so much swollen and inflamed from exposure and exercise as to wholly unfit him for duty.” Reuben was subsequently admitted on March 24 to the Second Division hospital (“Grace church” hospital) in Alexandria, Virginia, with a “contused wound of left leg, lower third”. He was sick in the hospital from March through May

On May 3, 1864, Reuben was transferred to the medical facilities in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and was admitted to Satterlee hospital in Philadelphia on May 4, with a contusion of the left leg, caused by an accident (details reportedly unknown by the medical staff).

Although he was probably still absent in the hospital Reuben was transferred to Company E, Fifth Michigan Infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. In fact he never served in the Fifth and in August of 1864 he was transferred from the hospital in Philadelphia to St. Mary’s in Detroit.

Reuben was reported as having been returned to duty on September 16, but by October of 1864 was back home in Orangeville recuperating from his injury. He probably never returned to Virginia and was transferred from St. Mary’s hospital in Detroit to Harper Hospital in Detroit on November 22, 1864, and on furlough from the hospital as of January 25, 1865. He was discharged from the hospital on May 20, 1865, at Detroit.

After the war Reuben remained in Michigan, probably at his home in Barry County. By 1870 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife Cynthia and two of his children in Orangeville. By 1874 he was residing in Caldwell, Missaukee County (although he listed his post office address as Manton, Wexford County). By 1880 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife in Bloomfield, Missaukee County. (Martin Babcock had also served in the civil war and was living in Bloomfield, Missaukee County in 1894.) According to the 1883 list of pensioners he was living in Holton, Muskegon County in 1883.

In 1874 Reuben applied for and received pension no. 140,054 (or 140057), drawing $4.00 a month in 1874.

Reuben died on October 29, 1887, possibly in Osceola County (perhaps in Leroy).

His widow was residing in Leroy, Osceola County in May of 1888. She applied for and received pension no. 288274.

James R. Ayres

James R. Ayres, also known as “Ayers”, was born 1840 in Stamford, Fairfield County, Connecticut, the son of Jeremiah N. or Joseph (1813-1882) and Frances Louisa (Newman, b. 1818).

Connecticut-born Jeremiah married Frances in Stamford on March 12, 1837, and they had three children of which James was the youngest. Jeremiah married his second wife Sarah E (b. 1818) and then his third (?) wife, Connecticut native Sarah Mariah Leeds (1819-1904) on June 21, 1849, in Stamford, and they had six children. By 1850 James was attending school with his older sister Emily and living with his family in Stamford where his father worked as a bookkeeper. By 1860 John was living in Stamford, at home with his family, where his father (“Joseph”, born in New York) owned and operated a factory (he owned some $7500 worth of real estate). Before the war broke out John left Connecticut and headed westward, eventually settling in Michigan.

John stood 5’4” with brown eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion, and was a 21-year-old farmer probably living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles”, a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.)

During the battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia, on May 2-3, 1863, James reportedly left the lines for 48 hours without permission. He was charged with deserting his company by Captain Israel Geer, then commanding Company C, and was court-martialled on August 1, 1863, at headquarters, First Division, Third Corps. Specifically, it was alleged that James did desert the company and regiment while it was engaged at the battle of Chancellorsville, and did not return to the regiment until May 3. he pled not guilty.

Lieutenant Theodore Hetz of Company C was called by the prosecution. Hetz swore that “On the 2nd of May, 1863, we were ordered to make a night charge. When we went in he was with the company while we were fighting, and acted very well. I did not again see him till the 4th day of May, when he reported to the regiment at the rifle pits.”
Judge Advocate: Was he in any other engagements, under fire, that day, previous to the charge?

Answer: Yes. We were engaged in the afternoon.

Judge Advocate: Was the accused with his company during the engagement of the afternoon?

Answer: Yes, he was there, and he behaved very well.

Prisoner: What has been my character as a soldier?

Answer: It has been very good. He has behaved well both in camp and in battle; he fought well at Gettysburg.
Lieutenant Hetz was then dismissed and the prosecution called First Sergeant Muhlberg. He testified that James

left the company after the charge was made, on or about the night of the 2nd of May, 1863. I saw him whenhe charged, he was in his place in the ranks. When we fell back, about 10 or 11 o’clock PM and took position in the rifle pits, I was ordered to call the roll, and I missed him, and reported him as missing in action. I did not see him again till the morning of the 4th of May 1863, when he returned, and reported himself to the regiment. For his absence, he gave, as an excuse, that he could not rejoin his regiment.
Judge Advocate: How did he behave in action?

Answer: He behaved well; he always does, he is a good soldier in camp also.

Judge Advocate: Has he been on duty since he has been a prisoner?

Answer: Yes, sir, and fought well at the battle of Gettysburg, Pa.

The defense then called George Shadduck of Company C.

Prisoner: What time did I return to my regiment after the charge made on the 2nd of May 1863?

Answer: He returned about dark, on the night of the 3rd.

James then called Mathias Greenwalt of Company C.

Prisoner: At what time did I report to my regiment aft the charge made the night of the 2nd of May?

Answer: I do not know whether he reported himself or not, but I saw him at the regiment on the night of the 3rd of May.

James then submitted the following statement to the court:

I got separated from my regiment in the charge on the night of 2nd of May, it was very dark, and I got into the 12th Army Corps; in the morning, at daybreak, I was with a large number of men, from different regiments (some from our brigade), put into the rifle pits on the left of the Chancellor House, and obliged to remain there till ordered to fall back, when, finding it a good opportunity to get to my regiment [did so].
James was found guilty and sentenced to forfeit one month’s pay. The officers of the court, however, signed a letter to the commanding general recommending that the sentence be remitted (which it was) due to his previous good character.

In any case, James reenlisted on December 24, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Lowell, Kent County, returned home (to Michigan or perhaps Connecticut) on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864, and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February. He was transferred to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864.

James was reportedly shot and killed by a rebel sharpshooter near Petersburg, Virginia on June 17, 1864. According to the treasurer of the Michigan Soldiers’ Relief Association, James, “while laboring on the breastworks, about fifty feet from brigade headquarters, fell, shot through the left breast by a rebel sharpshooter. He expired within two minutes, without uttering a word. He has been buried under a locust on the bank of a small stream, forty rods north of a road leading east of Petersburg, and a mile or two from that city. I understand he was a gallant soldier and much esteemed in his regiment.”

Originally buried on Henry Bryan’s property near Meade Station, Virginia, James was eventually reburied in City Point National Cemetery: section E, grave 2554.

No pension seems to be available.

Samuel Anderson - updated 4/5/2015

Samuel Anderson was born around 1846 in Tallmadge, Ottawa County, Michigan.

By 1860 Samuel was attending school and living with a wealthy miller named Thomas Woodbury and his family in Lamont, Tallmadge Township.

Samuel stood 5’5” tall with brown hair, brown eyes and with a dark complexion, and was an 18-year-old farmer living in either Lamont, Ottawa County or in Muskegon County when he enlisted on February 3, 1864, at the age of 18 in Company E, in Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Muskegon and was mustered in on February 4. Samuel joined the Regiment on February 10 and was listed as missing in action on May 12 at Spotsylvania, Virginia, and it seems that Samuel had in fact been taken prisoner. In any case, he was transferred as a prisoner-of-war to Company E, 5th Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the 3rd and 5th Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was reported as a prisoner through November of 1864.

There is no further record.

Sometime in the late 1860s the War Department was asked by persons unknown to investigate Samuel’s military history, and, on February 10, 1868, the War Department placed a notation in his service record stating that their “Investigation fails to elicit any further information relative to this soldier.”

There seems to be no pension available.

Charles B. Anderson

Charles B. Anderson was born 1840 in Rochester, Monroe County, New York, possibly the son of James (b. 1796) and Eliza B. (b. 1805).

New Jersey native James married New York-born Eliza, and they eventually settled in New York where they resided for some years. Sometime after Charles was born the family settled in western Michigan and by 1850 Charles was attending school with his older sister Nancy and they were living with their family on a farm in Otisco, Ionia County. Charles was still attending school and living with his family in Otisco in 1860.

He stood 5’10” tall, with black eyes, sandy hair and a light complexion, and was 21 years old and working as a teacher possibly living in Ionia County when he enlisted as Fourth Sergeant in Company K on May 13, 1861. In September of 1862 he was reportedly “commanding the company”, and the following month was transferred to the non-commissioned staff as Commissary Sergeant. He was absent sick in a hospital in Washington, DC in November of 1863. Although he was listed as hospitalized through February of 1864, he was well enough to reenlist on December 21, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia. He was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864 and if so he probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February.

At some point Charles was detached from the company to the commissary department and he was transferred as Commissary Sergeant to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was still listed on detached service, probably with the commissary department, in May and June. He was mustered out of service on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

In 1870 James Anderson was still living in Otisco, and by 1880 Eliza was living as a widow with her daughter Nancy in Otisco. (Nancy is also reported to be buried in Otisco cemetery.)

According to SUVCW Graves’ Registration Project Charles B. is buried in Ionia County, but this cannot be presently confirmed.

George Ames

George Ames was born 1838 in Seneca County, New York.

George eventually left New York and was possibly living in Ottawa County, Michigan when he married 18-year-old New York native Elizabeth Olmsted (b. 1843) on February 7, 1861, at Polkton, Ottawa County; they had at least two children: Delia L. (b. December 10, 1861) and Frederick I. (b. March 29, 1863). (Elizabeth was the sister of Lewis Olmstead who would also join the Third Michigan.) They were living in Greenfield, Wayne County in December of 1861, but had moved back to Ottawa County and were living in Wright by March of 1863 when their son Frederick was born.

George stood 5’8” with blue eyes, light hair and with light complexion, and was a 26-year-old farmer probably living in Tallmadge, Ottawa County when he enlisted on January 14, 1864, in Company E for 3 years at Grand Rapids, crediting Ada, Kent County; he was mustered on the same day. (His brother-in-law Lewis Olmstead would also enlist in Company E the following month.)

He was not sent out to the Regiment until February 10, 1864, and was transferred to Company E, Fifth Michigan Infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. George was reported as missing in action on October 27, 1864, following the engagement at Boydton Plank road, Virginia, and in fact had been taken prisoner on October 27. He died of scurvy on March 23, 1865, in either Libby prison, Richmond, Virginia, or in West’s Building Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland.

George was possibly buried in Richmond (if he did in fact die there), or in Baltimore, but in any event it appears that his remains were returned to Ottawa County and that he was buried in Marne cemetery. In fact, according to Van Eyck’s Ottawa County in the Civil War, as well as Ottawa County cemetery records, there is a stone memorial for “George Ames” in Marne (formerly Berlin) cemetery, Ottawa County, and the inscription “reads that George died while a prisoner at Libby prison, d. March 23, 1865.” (Also buried in Marne is one Hiram Ames, b. c. 1838.)

In May of 1865 Elizabeth was living in Ottawa County and in Berlin, Ottawa County, in October of 1865 when she applied for and received a widow’s pension (no. 62280); and in 1867 Elizabeth was listed as guardian when she applied for and received a minors’ pension (no. 105308). Elizabeth remarried in 1866 to one Calvin Martin. By 1870 Elizabeth and Calvin and Freddie Ames were living in Wright, Ottawa County; that same year Lillian was living with the Eli Sheldon family in Berlin, Ottawa County. Also living with the Sheldon family was Elizabeth’s brother Lewis Olmstead and his wife.