Andersonville

Martin M. Swart

Martin M. Swart was born in 1841, probably in New York.

In 1850 Martin was probably living with the Thomas Bell family in Gorham, Ontario County, New York where Martin attended school; a 10-year-old boy named Charles Swart lived nearby with the William Robson family. In any case, Martin eventually left New York and settled in western Michigan by the time the war broke out. (In 1860 there was one Abram Swart living in Orangeville, Barry County.)

He was 20 years old and possibly living in Barry County when he enlisted in Company E on May 13, 1861. (He may have been related to Robert Swart who also enlisted in Company E.) Martin was reported sick in the hospital from July of 1862 through October, on detached service in November and December, serving with the Brigade wagon train in January of 1863 and with the ambulance train from February through July. He was in the Division provost guard from September through December of 1863, on detached service in January of 1864, and at Brigade headquarters in February and at Division headquarters in March.

Martin was taken prisoner at Gaines’s Mill, Virginia on either June 1 or June 2, 1864, confined at Richmond June 3, and sent to Andersonville on June 8. He was admitted to the prison hospital on September 22 where he died on October 18 or 19, 1864, of scorbutus (scurvy). He was buried in Andersonville National Cemetery: grave 11,138.

No pension seems to be available.

Corydon Orcutt Jr. - updated 3/22/2015

Based on a review of pension records: 

Corydon Orcutt Jr. was born in 1832 or 1833 in Genesee County, New York, the son of Corydon Sr. (b. 1807 in New York) and Jemina Johnson (b. 1810 in Connecticut).

Corydon Sr. and Jemina eventually left New York and moved to Michigan sometime between 1848 and 1850 by which time they were living in Plainfield, Kent County where Corydon Sr. and Jr. both worked as laborers.

Corydon Jr. married New Yorker Catharine Levy (b. 1835) in West Sparta, Livinston County, New York, on November 18, 1853, and they had at least three children: Sarah Elizabeth (b. 1854), Samuel (b. 1861) and Mary (b. 1863).

Corydon may have been living in New York around 1855 when their first child was born but by 1856 Corydon had returned to Michigan. By 1860 Corydon Jr. was working as a shingle-maker and living with his wife and three children in Solon, Kent County; his neighbors on both sides were also shingle-makers. One of these was John Olim who was living with Leonard Parrish, and Leonard would also join the 3rd Michigan.

Corydon stood 5’6” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was a 32-year-old farmer possibly living in Kent County when he enlisted in Company F on January 30, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Cato, Montcalm County, and was mustered the same day. He joined the Regiment on March 27, was taken prisoner on June 2, 1864 at Gaines’ Mills, Virginia (near Spotsylvania), and was first confined in one of the prisons in Richmond, Virginia on June 3 and then sent to Andersonville prison on June 8. He was transferred as missing in action and a prisoner-of-war to Company F, 5th Michigan Infantry upon consolidation of the 3rd and 5th Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864.

On August 16 Corydon was admitted to the prison hospital at Andersonville where he died the same day of enteritis. He was buried in Andersonville National Cemetery: grave 5846.

In 1865 Catharine applied for and received a widow’s pension (no. 66033). The following year she remarried to Arnold Roberts of Livingston County, New York. In 1868 an application by Arnold Roberts was filed in Livingston County, New York, on behalf of Corydon’s three minor children (no. 146991).

Mathias Greenwald

Mathias Greenwald, also known as “Greenwalt,” was born in 1835.

Mathias was 26 years old and had probably just recently moved from Cook County, Illinois to Grand Rapids, Michigan, where he enlisted in Company F on May 13, 1861, and transferred to Company C on June 9 or 10, 1861. He was present for duty from January of 1862 until he was taken prisoner on November 30, 1863, at Mine Run, Virginia.

He was subsequently confined at Andersonville prison, where he died of disease on August 13, 1864, and was interred in the Andersonville National Cemetery: grave 5557.

In 1865 his mother applied for and received a pension (no. 108184).

Freeman Gilbert

Freeman Gilbert, also known as “Gilbert Freeman,” was born January 27, 1847, in Chester County, Pennsylvania, or Ohio, the son of Norton (1814-1903) and Mehitable (Whitman, 1817-1878).

New York native Norton married Massachusetts native Mehitable in 1839, near Cleveland, Ohio, where Norton owned property. In 1851 Norton moved his family to Byron, Kent County, Michigan, where they were still living in 1860.

Freeman stood 6’0” with gray eyes, dark hair and a light complexion, and was a 17-year-old farmer possibly living in Byron or perhaps in Oakfield, Kent County when he enlisted in Company K on January 23, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered the same day. He joined the Regiment on February 17 at Camp Bullock, Virginia, was captured on May 6, 1864, at the Wilderness, Virginia, and confined at Andersonville prison in Georgia. He was transferred as a prisoner-of-war to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864.

Norton was still living in Byron in 1870 and by 1890 he was probably living in Corinth, Kent County.

Freeman died of scorbutus on July 4, 1864, at Andersonville prison. He was reportedly buried in Andersonville National Cemetery: grave no. 2862; there is also a marker for him in Gilbert cemetery, Kent County; see photo G-182.

No pension seems to be available.

Norton and Mehitable were still living in Byron in 1870; by 1890 Norton was living in Corinth, Kent County.

James Fox

James Fox was born 1830 in Ireland.

James married Irish-born Catharine (b. 1831), sometime before 1851, possibly in Ireland and they had at least four children: Eliza (b. 1851), Lindley (b. 1853), Ferdinand (b. 1858) and Henry W. (b. 1860).

He and his wife left Ireland and immigrated to the United States (alone or together is unclear), eventually settling in Michigan before 1851. By 1860 James was a harness-maker living in Grand Rapids’ Third Ward with his wife and children.

James was 31 years old and living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company H on April 28, 1861. He was reported absent sick from August of 1862 through October and in November he was driving and ambulance. From December of 1862 through June of 1863 he worked as a saddler in the ambulance corps. He was taken prisoner on May 5, 1864, at the Wilderness, Virginia, and eventually sent to Andersonville prison.

Although he was reported discharged on June 20, 1864, at Detroit, in fact he died of disease at Andersonville on August 21, 1864, and was buried there: grave no. 6363.

In 1865 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 55555). She either died or remarried and in 1867 an application was filed on behalf of a minor child, and approved (no. 108770).

Gilbert Cooley

Gilbert Cooley was born around 1837 in Ontario, Canada.

Gilbert left Canada and eventually settled in the United States. He may have been the same Canadian-born Gilbert Cooley, age 24, who was working as a farm laborer for a wealthy lumberman named William Smith in Emmet, St. Clair County in 1860. In any case, by the time the war broke out Gilbert was probably working as a lumberman in Grand Haven, Ottawa County.

Gilbert stood 5’10” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion, and was 25 years old when he enlisted in Company I on August 22, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Ottawa, Ottawa County, and was mustered on August 27 at Detroit. (Company I was made up largely of men from Ottawa County, particularly from the eastern side of the County.) He joined the Regiment on September 27 at Upton’s Hill, Virginia. He was reported missing in action on May 2, 1863, at Chancellorsville, Virginia, and in fact he was taken prisoner on May 2 or 3 and paroled on May 14 at City Point, Virginia. He was sent to Camp Parole, Maryland on May 16, then on to Detroit and from Detroit Barracks to Camp Chase, Ohio on June 5 where he reported on June 6, 1863.

Gilbert had been promoted to Corporal by the time he returned (officially) to the Regiment on October 31 1863, and was on detached service driving an ambulance, and in November he was reported as an exchanged prisoner recuperating at the convalescent camp in Alexandria, Virginia, where he remained absent sick from December through January, 1864. It is quite possible that he reenlisted on January 1, 1864; if so he was probably absent on veteran’s furlough in January or February of 1864 and probably returned to the Regiment sometime in February or early March.

Gilbert was taken prisoner on June 2, 1864, at Gaines’ Mills, Virginia, confined at Richmond on June 3, and sent to Andersonville, Georgia on June. He was transferred as missing in action since May 31, 1864, to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and admitted to the Andersonville prison hospital on October 8 where he died of dysentery on October 11, 1864. He was buried in Andersonville National Cemetery: grave no. 10,644.

No pension seems to be available.

Anderson Brown

Anderson Brown was born 1844 in Ashtabula or Williamsfield, Ashtabula County, Ohio.

In 1840 there was one John G. Brown living in Williamsfield, Ashtabula County, Ohio. By 1850 there was an Anderson Brown attending school with four of his older siblings and living with his family in Island Creek, Jefferson County, Ohio, where his father worked as a laborer. Anderson eventually left Ohio, possibly with his family, and moved westward, settling in Michigan.

Anderson was an 18-year-old laborer possibly living in Coldwater, Branch County when he enlisted in Company G on September 27, 1862, at Coldwater for 3 years, crediting Coldwater. He joined the Regiment on October 9, 1862, at Upton’s Hill, Virginia. He was absent sick in June of 1863, but eventually returned to duty. Anderson was taken prisoner on January 4, 1864, while on picket duty near Eldora, Virginia. He was confined first at Richmond, Virginia -- possibly in Libby prison -- on January 8, and subsequently transferred to Andersonville prison at Americus, Georgia on March 10, 1864.

Anderson was admitted to the prison hospital on September 11, where he died of chronic diarrhea on September 15, 1864. He was buried in Andersonville National Cemetery: no. 8869.

There appears to be no pension available.

Francis Brinnick

Francis Brinnick, also known as “Brummick” or “Brunnick”, was born 1836 in Michigan.

In 1850 there was a 56-year-old shoemaker listed only as “Mr. Brinnick”, born in Ireland, living and working with another shoemaker named Thomas Perinton (?) in Jackson, Jackson County, Michigan; also living with him was his son (?) James J. Brinnick, born c. 1841 in Michigan and attending school in 1850. In any case, by 1860 Francis was living in Dallas, Clinton County with the Jacob Drake family. (Also living with the Drake family was one Jane Brinnick, age 20 also born in Michigan.)

Francis was 25 years old and still living in Clinton County when he enlisted on May 23, 1861, in Company C. He was taken prisoner on November 30, 1863, at Mine Run, Virginia, and confined first at Richmond on December 30 -- probably in Libby prison. He was subsequently sent to Andersonville, Georgia on March 18, 1864. According to prison medical records he was admitted for diarrhea to the prison hospital on March 13, 1864 and returned to the prison the following day. Francis recovered but was returned to the hospital on June 8 for diarrhea and scorbutus (scurvy).

He died of dysentery on July 1, 1864, and was buried in the National Cemetery at Andersonville: no. 3479.

There appears to be no pension available.

Jacob F. Bippley

Jacob F. Bippley, also known as “Bibbley” or “Bibblee”, was born 1833 in Medina, Ohio.

Jacob left Ohio and moved westward, eventually settling in western Michigan. By 1860 he was working a small farm in Sebawa, Ionia County, next door to his younger brother (?) John, also born in Ohio, and who was also working as a farm laborer.

Jacob stood 6’0” with blue eyes, light hair and a dark complexion and was a 29-year-old farmer probably living in Ionia County when he enlisted on March 3, 1862, in Company C at Saranac, Ionia County for 3 years, and was mustered March 13. He was absent sick in July of 1862 through August, probably at the U.S. General Hospital in Annapolis, Maryland. He eventually recovered and returned to the Regiment, and was reported missing in action on November 30, 1863, at Mine Run, Virginia. In fact he had been taken prisoner at Mine Run. He was initially confined at Richmond on December 30, and subsequently sent to Andersonville prison in Georgia on March 18, 1864.

Jacob died of chronic diarrhea at the Andersonville prison on July 12, 1864, and was buried in Andersonville National Cemetery: grave no. 3215.

No pension seems to be available.