Bennett

Jonas M. Bennett update 10/18/2016

Jonas M. or Joseph Bennett was born on February 23, 1844, in Grand Rapids, Kent County, Michigan, the son of Cyrus (b. 1809 in Massachusetts) and Dianna (Larnes, b. 1813 in New York).

Cyrus married Deanna Larnes in Washtenaw County, Michigan in 1834 and by 1839 had settled in Kent County; he was still living in Grand Rapids in 1840. By 1850 Cyrus was working as a carpenter and the family was still living in Grand Rapids where Jonas was attending school with three of his older siblings, including a brother George who would also join the 3rd Michigan. Jonas was living in Grand Rapids when he reportedly fell from a building in 1855 and dislocated his elbow.

Jonas eventually moved to Muskegon, Muskegon County probably to work in the growing lumber industry there and by 1860 he was working as a day laborer residing at the Chubb boarding house in Muskegon; he was also listed as living with his family, including his brother George, in Brooks, Newaygo County, where his father worked as a carpenter. Also living with Cyrus and his family was Jonas’ brother-in-law Charles Mills, and his wife Laura (Bennett) and their son Frederick.

Jonas stood 5’7” with blue eyes, black hair and a fair complexion, and was 18 years old and probably still living in Muskegon when he enlisted with his parents’ consent in Company H on April 5, 1861, along with his older brother George W.; his brother-in-law Charles enlisted in Company E. Jonas was quite probably related to George A. Bennett, who also enlisted in Company H. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers”, was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.)

Jonas was discharged on July 31, 1861, probably at Hunter’s Farm, Virginia, near Alexandria, for a deformed right elbow, injured some six years prior to enlistment. Jonas recalled in 1904 that in the spring of 1855 he fell from a building in Grand Rapids and dislocated his elbow. (In the winter of 1867, he jumped out of a burning building in Newaygo, Newaygo County, and broke his ankle.)

He returned home to Muskegon where he reentered the service under the name of “Joseph W. Bennett,” as Sergeant in Company C, 26th Michigan infantry on August 5, 1862, for 3 years, crediting Muskegon, and was mustered on September 15, 1862, at Jackson, Jackson County. (Jonas claimed in 1904 that he changed his name so he would be allowed to go back into the army, believing he would not be accepted because he had been previously discharged for a disability.)

The 26th infantry was organized at Jackson between September 10 and December 12, 1862, and mustered into service on December 12. The regiment left Michigan for Washington on December 13 and was on provost duty at Alexandria, Virginia until April 20, 1863. It was moved to Fort Richmond, New York City harbor on July 14 where it remained until mid-October when it rejoined the army of the Potomac. It participated in the Mine Run campaign of November -December and various actions around the Rapidan River in February of 1864. It is unclear if, however, Jonas (or Joseph) e

ver left Michigan with the 26th infantry. He was transferred to the Veterans Reserve Corps (VRC).

It is possible that Jonas was transferred to the VRC while still in Michigan. In any case, he had returned to Michigan, possibly as a consequence of being transferred to the VRC and was on detached service from February of 1864 through April at the draft rendezvous in Grand Rapids (Camp Lee). When the Grand Rapids draft depot was closed down in the summer of 1864, he was sent to the draft rendezvous at Jackson in July where he remained until he was mustered out on May 31, 1865. After the war Jonas remained in western Michigan and by 1867 was living in Newaygo, Newaygo County when he broke his ankle jumping from a building to escape a fire. For a time lived in Greenville, Montcalm County.

He was possibly still living in Grand Rapids when he became a member of the Old 3rd Michigan Infantry Association sometime around 1872 (shortly after the Association was organized). He married Julia Tubbs in Grand Rapids, in 1866, and they had one child; they were divorced in 1879.

In 1870 he was operating a saloon and living with his wife in Muskegon’s 2nd Ward, Muskegon County. He married his second wife, one Julia or Juliette Cervier (or Cenvier), in Denver in 1886; they had one child, Leila Grace (b. 1888).

Jonas eventually moved to Leadville, Colorado and engaged in mining. He was living at the rear of 133 W. 9th in Leadville from 1888 to 1890. By the late 1890s he was living in Cripple Creek and Victor, El Paso County, Colorado when he applied for and received pension no. 1,100,153, dated 1897, drawing $6.00 per month by mid-1905. He lived for a time in Texas and Montana, and by 1903-4 he was living in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (possibly with George W.).

Jonas died on October 21, 1905, possibly in Oklahoma City and may be buried there.

William W. Bennett

William W. Bennett was born August 14, 1839, in Washington County, New York, the son of Morris (b. 1812) and Mary (Winnie, b. 1808).

New York natives Morris and Mary were married presumably in New York where they resided for many years. The family moved from New York to Michigan sometime after 1854 and by 1860 William was living with his family and working as a farm laborer in Wyoming, Kent County.

William W. stood 5’8” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was 21 years old and probably living in Wyoming when he enlisted in Company B on May 13, 1861. (Company B was made up largely of men from the Grand Rapids area, many of whom had served in various local militia units before the war, in particular the Grand Rapids Artillery, under Captain Baker Borden, who would also command Company B.) He may have been related to James D. Bennett, who lived on the west side of the Grand River and who also enlisted in Company B. Also, James had served in the GRA before the war.

William was present for duty from January of 1862 through June of 1863, and awarded the Kearny Cross for his service during the battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia on May 3, 1863.

William was treated for a headache on May 16 and 17, 1863, and returned to duty. He was quite possibly a Corporal when, while en route to New York City with the regiment, he was struck down with dysentery and was admitted to Grace Church (Second Division General) hospital in Alexandria, Virginia, on August 16, 1863, suffering from chronic diarrhea.

He apparently remained hospitalized until, after being examined by a Medical Board, he was transferred to an unassigned (possibly the Second Batallion) detachment of the Veterans’ Reserve Corps with chronic diarrhea on March 4, 1864. (The VRC was made up of men who while ambulatory were generally incapable of performing regular military tasks due to having suffered debilitating wounds and/or diseases and were assigned to garrison the many supply depots, draft rendezvous, camps, forts, prisons, etc. scattered throughout the northern cities, thus freeing able-bodied men for regular military duty.) He later claimed that he was discharged on June 9, 1864 (which would have coincided with the end of his term of service of three years), at Washington, DC.

In any case, William was apparently been discharged from the army for dysentery, eventually returned to his home in Grand Rapids where he reentered the service in Company A, Tenth Michigan cavalry on February 11, 1865, for one year, crediting Walker and was mustered on February 15.

He joined the Regiment on March 16 at Knoxville, Tennessee, and possibly participated in Stoneman’s expedition into east Tennessee, southwestern Virginia and west North Carolina from March 21-April 25; the regiment was on duty at Lenoir and Sweetwater, Tennessee from about May until August and in west Tennessee until November. William was mustered out with the regiment on November 11, 1865, at Memphis,Tennessee.

After the war William returned to Michigan. His parents had settled in Alpine Township, Kent County sometime before 1870 and by 1880 William had returned to his family and was working as a laborer and living with his parents in Alpine. William was living in Alpine in 1890 and in 1907 and at RFD no. 7, Box 33, Grand Rapids in 1909 and in Alpine in 1912.

William apparently never married.

He was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association. In 1891 he applied for and received pension no. 881,777, drawing $30.00 per month by 1917.

William was living at RFD No. 1, Comstock Park, just outside of Grand Rapids when he died of arteriosclerosis on August 15, 1917, in Alpine and was buried in Pine Grove cemetery, Alpine Township.

William Bennett

William Bennett was born 1833 in England.

William eventually immigrated to the United States, settling in western Michigan.

He stood 5’10” with gray eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion and was a 37-year-old farmer possibly living in Ronald, Ionia County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company E on January 27, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered the same day, crediting Ronald. (Company E was composed in large part by men from Clinton and Ingham counties, as well as parts of Ionia County.)

He joined the Regiment on February 10, and was present for duty through April. He was reportedly wounded in the back of the neck by a shell fragment during action at the North Anna River, Virginia, on or about May 27, 1864. In any case, he was apparently serving with the regiment and was transferred to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was reported absent sick from June 12, 1864, and then again through October and indeed through the spring of 1865.

In fact, William was admitted to Lincoln General Hospital in Washington, DC, on June 15, and was treated for a contusion of the lumbar region, reportedly as a result of being wounded on June 1 at Cold Harbor, Virginia. He was transferred on July 28, to the general hospital in York, Pennsylvania, where he arrived the following day. He stated at the time that “he was injured by a tree falling upon him before Petersburg, Va., the beginning of June”. However, the examining physician noted that William “pretends to be unable to maintain the erect position, [yet there is] no evidence of any injury.” William was subsqeuently furloughed from the hospital on November 1, readmitted on November 22, and then returned to duty on November 28.

He was listed as present at the end of April of 1865, and was mustered out July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war William returned to Michigan and lived for for two or three years in Lowell, Kent County and may have spent some time in Gratiot County as well.

In the early 1880s, possibly around 1883, he moved west, eventually settling in Shelton, Buffalo County, Nebraska, where he worked as a farmer and laborer. By 1885 he was living in Shelton, Nebraska.

He was living in Shelton in 1886 when he applied for a pension (claim no. 564,777) but the certificate was never granted.

William was living in Grand Island (possibly at the State Soldier’s Home), Hall County, Nebraska, when he married his second wife, Mrs. Catharine Hare (b. 1835, widow of Sylvester Hare) on June 2, 1888, in Grand Island.

On July 21, 1891, William was admitted to the Nebraska Hospital for the Insane in Lincoln. On November 30, 1891, George Spencer, a Justice of the peace in Grand island wrote to the pension bureau responding to their inquiry about William Bennett’s pension application. “Sometime ago Mr. Bennett became so feeble that he was wholly past all work & became a public charge & was supported a few days at our Co. poor house & then admitted to our Soldiers Home [in Grand Island]. He became violently insane & was sent to” Lincoln, Nebraska “and is still there with no prospect of recovery. He has a wife something over 50 years of age.”

Indeed, William remained a patient in Lincoln until he died of consumption on February 20, 1892, and was reportedly buried at Grand Island.

His widow applied for a pension (no. 545278), but the certificate was never granted.

James D. Bennett

James D. Bennett was born March 4, 1841, in Michigan, the son of John Delivan (1811-1887) and Mary Ann (Borden, 1811-1866).

New Yorkers John D. and Mary were presumably married in New York where they were living by 1832 when their oldest son Joseph was born. John brought his family to Michigan and had settled in Lodi, Washtenaw County by 1838 when his son William was born and was probably living in Salem Township, Washtenaw County by 1840. By 1850 James was attending school with four of his older siblings, including his brother William and they were all living on the family farm in Lodi. John D. eventually moved his family to the western side of the state, settling in Grand Rapids, Kent County.

In December of 1859 James was living in Grand Rapids when he joined the Grand Rapids Artillery, a Grand Rapids militia company made up mostly of men from the west side of the Grand River and commanded by Captain Baker Borden, who would become the first captain of Company B, Third Michigan infantry. (Baker was probably related to James’ mother Mary. In fact, Baker first settled his family in Lodi, Washtenaw County in the late 1830s before moving to the western side of the state.) In addition, James’ older brother William B. may have been the same “William D. Bennett” who joined the Grand Rapids Artillery on June 16, 1860. (In turn, this may have been the same "William W. Bennett" who also served in the GRA and subsequently in Company B, Third Michigan Infantry.)

In 1859-60 James’ father was manufacturing vinegar on the west side of Turner Street between Second and Third Streets on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids, and in 1860 James was living with his family in Grand Rapids’ Fourth Ward and possibly working as a tinsmith. Next door lived Elisha O. Stevens who would also join the Third Michigan.

James was 21 years old and still living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted as Fourth Sergeant in Company B on May 13, 1861. James was promoted to Second Lieutenant, commissioned on October 27, 1862, replacing Lieutenant George Remington.

He was probably present for duty with the regiment from the time it arrived in Washington in June of 1861 until May of 1863 when he was court-martialled shortly after the battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia.

At 10:00 a.m. on May 25, 1863, James was court martialled at Second Brigade headquarters, First Division, Third Corps, near Falmouth, Virginia, for being AWOL during the battle of Chancellorsville, on May 2, 3 & 4 of 1863.

Specifically, he was charged with, first, “Conduct prejudicial to good order and military discipline” in that he “did leave his company and Regiment on the night of the 2nd day day of May, while said company and Regiment were engaged with the enemy [at Chancellorsville] and did not return until the morning of the 4th day of May 1863.” Second, he was charged with being “Absent without leave,” that he “did leave his company and Regiment without the consent or knowledge of his company commander (First Lieutenant Alfred Pew) or Regimental commander (Colonel Byron R. Pierce), and did remain absent about two days. All this while the Regiment was engaged with the enemy at or near Chancellorsville, Va., on or about the 2nd, 3rd & 4th days of May 1863.”

Brigadier General J. H. Ward presided over the court which consisted of Colonels Samuel Hayman of the Thirty-seventh New York, Thomas Egan of the Fortieth New York, A. S. Leidy (?) of the Ninety-ninth Pennsylvania, Peter Sides of the Fifty-seventh Pennsylvania, Byron Pierce of the Third Michigan and Lieutenant Col. E. Burt of the Third Maine; Major W. C. Taylor of the Twentieth (?) Indiana was the Judge Advocate. The accused was asked if he had any objection to any member of the court and replied no. First Lieutenant Alfred Pew, First Sergeant William Coughtry and Sergeant David Northrup (all of Company B) were called as witnesses for the prosecution. Bennett pled guilty to both charges and specifications, was found guilty on both and sentenced to “forfeit all pay and allowances that are or may become due him and that he be cashiered.”

On June 7, while the regiment was at Belle Plain, Virginia, David Northrup of Company B wrote to a former Company B soldier, Fred Stow discussing this incident.

You mention the report of the arrest of James [Bennett] and Almon Borden. It is too true. Their sentence is as you hear. Capt. Borden dismissed with pay [and] James cashiered, dismissed without pay. It is the opinion of all that it is unjustly hard on James. It ought to be reversed the two. Borden ought to go without pay. The charge against James was deserting his company before the enemy. He went in with us the night of the charge and was not seen till Monday morning. We all supposed him killed or taken prisoners. But Monday morning he made his appearance. He is with Al[mon Borden] in Washington at present. I do not know what they intend to do. Now do not tell anyone that I have written anything about it. It must be a severe blow to his father. I presume he will take it hard. James has been anxious, very, to get out of the service but I think at too great a sacrifice. I am very sorry and do not know hardly how to express my thoughts. I should rather have sacrificed my life than to have to have such a thing to think of. I would not let this be public even to his friends if they do not know it. You will see it in the Herald of June second or third. I do not remember which. I have not got through but must close for the want of more room.

Interestingly, on October 31, 1864, the War Department informed Michigan Governor Austin Blair that the sentence of Bennett’s court martial “is hereby removed, and he can be recommissioned an officer of Volunteers”, presumably to serve in the colored troops. And in fact James served as First Lieutenant in Company C, Thirteenth United States Colored Heavy Artillery. The Thirteenth had been organized at Camp Nelson, Kentucky on June 23, 1864 and was attached to the District of Kentucky (Dept. of Ohio) until February of 1865 and then to the Dept. of Kentucky until November. It was in garrison duty at Camp Nelson, Smithland, Lexington and a variety of other points in Kentucky. The regiment was mustered out of service on November 18, 1865.

After the war James eventually returned to his home in western Michigan and by 1865-66 was working as a clerk and living at 34 Fourth Street on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids, next door to one J. H. Bennett.

No pension seems to be available.

James apparently never married and was probably working as a tinsmith when he died of consumption in Grand Rapids on November 24, 1867. His funeral service was held at the West Side Presbyterian Church (where the funeral of Francis Barlow of Company I had been held in 1864), and he was buried in Greenwood cemetery: section C lot 1. (David Northrup would also die of consumption in Grand Rapids in 1876 and he too was buried in Greenwood cemetery after a funeral at the Presbyterian Church on the West Side.)

James’ headstone describes Bennett as “A sacrifice in the slaveholder rebellion.”

His father John remarried one Emma, who died in 1878.

Jackson J. Bennett

Jackson J. Bennett was born 1828 in Ellery, Chautauqua County, New York.

Jackson left New York and was probably living in Pennsylvania when he married his first wife, Abigail Rue in Rome, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, on October 21, 1849, they had one son, Omer or Osmer (b. 1856).

Jackson and his wife may have been living in Spring Creek, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania in 1856 (when Omer was born). In any case, they probably moved from Erie County, Pennsylvania to Michigan in the late 1850s, and by 1860 Jackson was working as a laborer and living at the Pemberton boarding house in Muskegon, Muskegon County. (Also living at the same boarding house was Charles Althouse, who would enlist in Company H as well, and one William Jackson, who may have been the same William Jackson who would enlist in Company A.

(It should also be noted that in 1860 there was a 25-year-old domestic named Abby Bennett, living in Union, Erie County, Pennsylvania; also living in Erie County, in Franklin, were John, William and Margaret Rue, b. c. 1807, 1802, and 1806, respectively, all in New York.)

Jackson stood 5’8’ with blue eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion and was 33 years old and probably still working as a laborer in Norton, Muskegon County when he joined the Muskegon Rangers in April as Fifth Sergeant. The “Rangers” were a local militia company formed in Muskegon soon after the fall of Fort Sumter in April of 1861, and upon their arrival in Grand Rapids were reorganized into Company H of the Third Michigan infantry then forming at Cantonment Anderson in Grand Rapids. Jackson subsequently enlisted as Fifth Sergeant in Company H on May 13, 1861.

Jackson was reported sick in the regimental hospital sometime during the months of November and December of 1861 while the regiment was in winter quarters at Camp Michigan, Virginia, near Alexandria. He was discharged on March 4, 1862 at Camp Michigan for chronic spinitis, “the result of chronic inflammation of the lumbar vertebra of the spine and extending down the illiac . . . to the thighs disenabling [sic] him from walking or standing.” It was also reported that he had been “in poor health when he first joined the regt.”

Following his discharge Jackson returned to Michigan, and was residing in Grand Rapids in 1862 and 1864.

In 1862 Jackson applied for and received a pension (no. 45,204), dated March 1862, drawing $4.00 per month.

He was married a second time (apparently he had divorced Abigail), to Sarah Anne.

Jackson died on January 1 or 17, 1865, in Grand Rapids, possibly of kidney failure or of chronic diarrhea. Although no burial record is available, it is possible that he may have been one of the several “unknown” soldiers buried in either Greenwood or Oak Hill cemeteries.

His first wife, Abigail (“Abby”) remarried one Alex McGinty in 1867, and in 1868 she was living in Winnebago County, Wisconsin, seeking to gain a minor’s pension, as guardian, for Omer Bennett (minor’s pension application no. 164,967), Jackson’s son, but the certificate was never granted.

George W. Bennett update 10/18/2016

George W. Bennett was born on October 8, 1839, in Grand Rapids, Kent County, Michigan, the son of Cyrus (b. 1809 in Massachusetts) and Dianna (Larnes, b. 1813 in New York).

Cyrus married Deanna Larnes in Washtenaw County, Michigan in 1834 and by 1839 had settled in Kent County; he was still living in Grand Rapids in 1840. By 1850 Cyrus was working as a carpenter and the family was still living in Grand Rapids where George was attending school with three of his siblings, including a younger brother Jonas who would also join the 3rd Michigan. By 1860 Cyrus had moved his family to Brooks, Newaygo County where George and Jonas were both living with the family and where Cyrus continued to work as a carpenter. Also living with Cyrus and his family was George’s brother-in-law Charles Mills, and his wife Laura (Bennett) and their son Frederick.

George stood 5’8” with gray eyes, black hair and a fair complexion, and was a 22-year-old mechanic living in Muskegon County or Newaygo County when he enlisted as Second Corporal in Company H on May 13, 1861, along with his younger brother Jonas; his brother-in-law Charles enlisted in Company E. George W. was quite probably related to George A. Bennett, who enlisted at the same time as Second Sergeant of Company H. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.)

George W. reportedly deserted on November 26, 1861 (so did George A. Bennett) at a camp near Fort Lyon, Virginia and returned under President Lincoln’s proclamation of amnesty on April 7, 1863, at Camp Pitcher, Virginia (so did George A.). He was treated for boils from May 21 to 28, and returned to duty. He was diagnosed with syphilis and sent to a hospital on September 16, 1863, and he remained hospitalized until he was furloughed on January 16, 1864. He was apparently back in the hospital by the middle of March, suffering from gonorrhea, and he remained hospitalized, possibly at the regimental hospital, until he was mustered out on June 20, 1864, at Detroit.

After his discharge from the army George returned to Michigan and may have spent a short time in Newaygo County in late 1864.

By 1865 he was living in Jackson, Jackson County, when he married Alice Burch (1844-1893) on December 20, 1864, in Jackson, and they had at least two children: Clarence (b. 1866) and Arthur (b. 1867).

In 1865 George moved to Muskegon, Muskegon County where he operated a restaurant on Western Avenue. In 1878 George quit the restaurant business in Muskegon and moved his family to Anthony, Kansas where he engaged in the hotel business, and by 1880 he was running a hotel in Anthony and living with his wife and children. By 1889 or 1893 he was living in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, where his sons operated the Bennett Investment co. He was apparently back in Anthony, Kansas, in 1898 when he applied for and received a pension (no. 775,092), drawing $21.50 per month by 1914. (His brother Jonas, who also served in the Old Third lived his last years in Oklahoma City as well; see his biographical sketch below.)

He joined the Old 3rd Michigan Infantry Association in 1872 and was probably a member of the Episcopal Church.

George was a widower and reportedly deaf in both ears when he died in Oklahoma City of lung disease on September 7, 1914; he was buried in Forest Park Cemetery, Anthony, Kansas.

George A. Bennett

George A. Bennett was born 1839 in New Haven, Connecticut.

George left Connecticut and moved westward, eventually settling in western Michigan.

He was 22 years old and probably living in Muskegon County when he enlisted as Second Sergeant in Company H on May 13, 1861, and was probably related to brothers George W. and Jonas Bennett who also enlisted in Company H. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers”, was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.)
George was reported as having deserted on November 26, 1861, as did George W. Bennett also of Company H. It is quite likely that George A. was related to brothers George W. Bennett, who enlisted at the same time as Second Corporal of Company H and Jonas Bennett who also enlisted in Company H.)

In any case, while he was away from the regiment -- presumably as a deserter -- George married Helen Dean (b. 1836) on March 30, 1863, in Freeport, Stephenson County, Illinois. George eventually returned to the regiment from desertion under President Lincoln’s proclamation of amnesty on April 7, 1863, at Camp Pitcher, Virginia (oddly enough so did George W. Bennett).

George died on August 8 or 10, 1863, of typhoid fever at Frederick, Maryland, and was buried on August 11 in “Area O Hospital cemetery” (now Mt. Olivet cemetery) in Frederick. His remains were reinterred in Antietam National Cemetery (grave no. 2557).

In 1864 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 23,479).

Helen remarried James D. Cheeseman (d. 1916) in 1866 in Muskegon, Muskegon County. She was residing in Muskegon in 1919.

Charles Bennett

Charles Bennett was born 1843 in Eaton County, Michigan, probably the son of Lyman (b. 1814) and Irene (b. 1815).

New York natives Lyman and Irene were married probably in New York where they resided for some years. They left New York sometime after 1839 and by 1840 Lyman had settled his family in Oneida, Eaton County, Michigan. By 1850 Charles was attending school with his older siblings and living on the family farm in Oneida. By 1860 Charles and his two sisters Sarah and Elizabeth were living with the Allard family in Eaton Rapids, Eaton County.

Charles was an 18-year-old farmer who stood 5’9” with brown eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion, probably living in Eaton County when he enlisted in Company B on May 13, 1861. He was discharged for consumption on July 29, 1861, at Arlington Heights, Virginia.

It appears that after being discharged Charles returned to Eaton County where he married New York native Lucinda Warren (1844-1912) in Eaton Rapids on March 23, 1862. They had at least three children: Emily (b. 1866), Burton (b. 1868) and Mary Jane (b. 1870).

Charles reentered the service in Company K, Seventh Michigan cavalry on March 26, 1864, at Eaton Rapids for 3 years, crediting Eaton County, and was mustered April 9 at Jackson, Jackson County. From September through November of 1864 he was on detached service, then reported AWOL from January of 1865 through April of 1865, and absent sick from May through September. According to a statement he made in March of 1868, on or about April 15, 1865, while serving with the Seventh Michigan cavalry near Point-of-Rocks, Maryland, he contracted hip disease. He was subsequently sent to Judiciary Square hospital in Washington, DC, until the middle of June when he was transferred to Douglas Hospital in Washington. He also claimed to have remained at Douglas Hospital until he was discharged.

And indeed, it is reported in one source that he was discharged for disability on August 10, 1865. Other records, however, note that on November 17, 1865, he was transferred to Company C, First Michigan cavalry -- along with the veterans and recruits from the Seventh Michigan cavalry. The First Michigan cavalry served was on duty in the District of Utah from November of 1865 until March of 1866. In any case, Charles was absent sick as of December 31, 1865, at Washington, DC, and subsequently mustered out with the First Michigan cavalry on March 10, 1866, at Salt Lake City, Utah.

After he left the army Charles returned to Eaton County, settling in Eaton Rapids where he remained until August of 1867 when he moved to Walton Township, in Eaton County, and he worked as a farmer for a number of years. He was still living in Walton in 1868, but by 1870 Charles and Lucinda moved their family back to a farm in Eaton Rapids, and were probably residing on Lake Street by 1874.

In 1865 Charles applied for and received pension no. 90715.

Charles died, presumably at his home on Lake Street in Eaton Rapids, on June 2, 1874, and was presumably buried in or near Eaton Rapids.

His widow applied for and received pension no. 169991. She was living as a widow in Dimendale, Eaton County, in 1880, along with two of her children. She eventually remarried in 1883 to one Henry Geissbrook (d. 1899), in Alaidon, Ingham County. Subsequently a pension was filed on behalf of at least one minor child and granted (no,. 203663). By 1901 Lucinda was living in Corunna, Shiawassee County.

Alonzo H. Bennett

Alonzo H. Bennett was born 1830 in Orleans County, New York, the son of Matthew (b. 1798).

In 1830 there was one Matthew Bennett living in Barre, Orleans County, New York. In any case, Matthew eventually took his family and left New York, settling in western Michigan. By 1850 Alonzo was attending school and working as a laborer and living in Hastings, Barry County, with his father who worked as a laborer and one Ester Bennett (b. 1828) and six-month-old Henry Bennett.

Alonzo married New York native Alma Sheldon (1837-1922), on February 6, 1853, at her family’s home in Hastings, and they had at least two children: Clarence (1855-1940) and Frank L. (b. 1857).

The relationship between Alonzo and Alma was a rough one, at least for her. Apparently Alonzo was a chronic alcoholic and on numerous occasions threatened his wife and children. According to a statement Alma made in 1864, not long after they were married, in the winter of 1855 he

turned her out of doors calling her all the vile names he could seemingly think of such as whore, and other terms by which he could most deeply injure and wound the feelings of [his wife], that at this time [she] was compelled to seek shelter and lodgings at the home of her mother who resided in the village of Hastings, that she at that time remained with her mother for several week and finally returned to the house of her husband upon his promising to treat her better in the future. . . . Some time after Alonzo came one evening in a state of intoxication and demanded of [his wife] five dollars in money, being the money he had given her before that time, he told [her] that if she did not give it to him he would take her life and seized [her] in a violent manner and treated her so cruelly and threatened her in such a manner that [she] was compelled to leave her house and again seek safety from him with her mother, at which time [she] remained some eight weeks, when . . . Alonzo by his promises and persuasion again induced her to return with him, but [she] had not been back with him three days before he again commenced his ill-treatment and abuse of [her] calling her a whore and seeking opportunities to do it in a public manner, and accusing [Alma] of being improperly with and having improper intercourse with different men, among whom he named his own brother Luther Bennett.

By 1860 Alonzo was working as a shoemaker and living with his wife and two children in Hastings; next door lived a plow maker named Washington Bellows who may have been the the same George W. Bellows who also served in the Old Third from Hastings.
Alonzo was 33 years old and residing in Hastings when he enlisted as a Private in Company F, Eighth Michigan infantry on August 30, 1861, and was mustered on September 23. He was discharged for disability on February 13, 1863, at Detroit.

Alonzo returned to his home in Michigan and resumed his previous bad habits. Finally in September of 1863 Alma took her children and left Alonzo for good. And in November she sued for divorce on the grounds that he was habitually and chronically drunk and neglected and abused his wife and children and was an adulterer. During the divorce hearing on January 13, 1864, according to one Mortimer Buck, who had known Alonzo for some fifteen or sixteen years, during the last three or four years or more Alonzo was seen “frequently and habitually intoxicated.”

Furthermore, he stated that Alonzo “during this time had pretended to live with his wife. Sometime in September last or thereabouts I was standing on the steps of Hadley’s mill in the village of Hastings” when he saw Alonzo

pass along the road going east and some ten or fifteen minutes afterwards I saw Mrs. Ellen Low passing up the road after him, This was sometime in the afternoon. Seeing the defendant pass, followed by Mrs. Low I had some suspicions and Mr. John Buckle with whom I was in company and myself concluded to follow them: we passed on up the road and saw her in conversation with the Bellevue mail carrier who was then coming in from Bellevue with the mail to Hastings. While she remained in conversation with him we stopped and were concealed from her sight about ten or twelve rods back. After she got through talking with the mail carrier she pass on east out of town and the mail carrier came into the village. She passed on out of the village and turned into the brush on the right hand side of the road on Mr. Renfield’s premises. I turned into the woods where she had turned off from the road and looked in the bushes on the south side of the road for them and in about five minutes I came right on them. When I first saw her she was on her feet and leaving somewhat hastily. I think they had discovered me. [Alonzo] was lying on the ground [and] on discovering me asked me what I would have. I replied “not anything.” I only wanted to satisfy myself. He said “what are you going to do about it?” I replied that I was satisfied and turned and left him lying on the ground. The place where I saw them was about ten rods from the road in the thick brush. I regard [Alonzo] as a disreputable character and a person not fit to have the care and custody of a family of children. I had heard stories about Mrs. Low that she was a bad character and she was in the habit of calling at my house. I wanted to satisfy myself if those stories were true, if she was a bad character and therefore I followed them having seen Bennett pass that way which was unusual for him and followed soon after by her.

In his sworn testimony Mr. Buckle affirmed Mr. Buck’s statement, adding that for some seven years Alonzo “has spent pretty much all his time lounging at groceries and saloons drinking liquor. He is a low disreputable character and I think is not a fit person to have the care of children.”

Alonzo and Alma were divorced on January 25, 1864 and Alma was awarded custody of their three children.

Alonzo was 34 years old and probably living in Maple Grove, Barry County when he enlisted in Company E on February 8, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Maple Grove, and was mustered the same day. (His father was living in Hastings in 1864.) Alonzo was admitted to Third Division hospital in Alexandria, Virginia on February 27, 1864, suffering from chronic alcoholism and returned to duty on May 2.

He was listed as missing in action on May 12, 1864, at Spotsylvania, Virginia, and in fact had been taken prisoner. He was transferred as a prisoner-of-war to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was eventually exchanged at either Savannah, Georgia or Charleston, South Carolina. By the end of the year he was at Annapolis, Maryland, where he was furloughed from Camp Parole, Maryland on January 16, 1865.

In February Alonzo was home in Hastings, and then reported to Detroit Barracks on March 3, and on March 29 was sent back to Camp Parole, Maryland where he was discharged on May 30, 1865, by general order no. 77.

It seems that Alonzo eventually returned to his home in Barry County. By 1870 he was working as a shoemaker for and/or living with a boot and shoe dealer named William Darling and his family in Hastings. Next door lived Edwin Mallory who had also served in the Old Third; in 1870 his son Clarence was working as a farm laborer for the Phillips family in Rutland, Barry County.

Alonzo died on April 4, 1875, presumably in Hastings and according to one source Alonzo is buried in Barry County.

By 1880 Clarence was working as a servant for the Seth Stone in Hastings and Frank was working as a laborer and living with the Ezra Fifield family in Hastings; no mention is noted in 1880 for either Alma or Alonzo. (Curiously, there is one Alma Bennett, 1838-1922, buried in Riverside cemetery in Hastings; Clarence too is buried in Riverside. Note that Evaline Fifeld was a witness at the wedding of Alma and Alonzo in 1864)

In 1890 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 376970). She was living at 800 Jefferson Street in Grand Ledge, Eaton County, in 1917. Alma was buried in Riverside cemetery, Hastings: 2-I west, NW 1/4-1; both sons are also buried in Riverside Cemetery as well.