Canada

James Henry Van Dusen - update 8/21/2016

James Henry Van Dusen was born on January 26, 1838, in Scotland, Brant County, Ontario, Canada, the son of Abram (or Abraham or Abner, b. 1811) and Louisa (Malcolm, 1816-1853).

New York native Abram married Canadian-born Louisa in 1837 in Scotland, Ontario, Canada, where they resided for many years. Sometime after 1849 Abram brought his family to Michigan and by 1850 he was working as a physician and James was attending school with his younger brother Charles (who would also join the Third Michigan) and younger sister Cecilia in Detroit, Wayne County. Abram eventually settled his family on the western side of the state and by 1853 when Louisa died they were living in Grand Haven, Ottawa County. In about 1855 Abram remarried New York native Laura Robinson (b. 1813), and by 1860 he was practicing medicine in Grand Haven, Ottawa County. (He married his third wife Lucinda Newwell in about 1861 in Michigan.)

James stood 5’8” with brown eyes, black hair and a fair complexion and was a 23-year-old farm laborer probably living in Muskegon or Spring Lake, Ottawa County when he enlisted in Company A, joining his brother Charles, on November 12, 1861, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered on December 23 at Detroit. James was reported as a clerk at (presumably Brigade) headquarters from August of 1862 through September, and indeed, according to his pension application declaration of 1905, he “was detailed in General Berry’s Brigade headquarters as clerk at Yorktown,” Virginia (which would have been in the spring of 1862).

By the end of June of 1862 he was sick in a hospital in Bottom’s Bridge, Virginia, suffering from”fever, ague and debility. He was absent sick in November, and allegedly deserted on November 12, 1862, at Alexandria, Virginia, although he claimed in later years that he had in fact been discharged, presumably for disability, at Alexandria, Virginia sometime in October of 1862.

It is not known if James returned to Michigan after his discharge from the army.

He did however return to Brant County, Ontario, Canada, where he married Brant native Kate Malcolm (1846-1910) on April 7, 1863, in Brantford, and they had at least eight children: Charles H. (b. 1865), Alfred M. (b. 1867), Jennie L. 9b. 1869), Louis (b. 1870), Will W. (b. 1872), Stella (b. 1878), Mysta (b. 1879) and James M. (1881).

They settled in Scotland, Ontario where he worked as a druggist for many years. By 1906 he was still living in Scotland, but by 1912 he was reportedly living in Barrington, Massachusetts.

In 1905 his application for pension (no. 1,330,971) was rejected, reasons unknown, but possibly because the charge of desertion was never removed.

James was probably a widower when he died on February 12, 1918, probably in Brant and was buried in Scotland cemetery in Brant.

Simeon D. Woodard - update 9/11/2016

Simeon D. Woodard was born in 1843 in Canada, the son of Vermonter Dexter (1812-1895) and Artemissia (Dutcher, 1812-1898).

Simeon’s parents were married in 1829 and by 1851 the family was living in Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada. Sometime between 1855 and 1859 the family left Canada and by 1860 Simeon and his family had settled in Leoni, Jackson County.

Simeon stood 5’9” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was an 18-year-old farmer possibly living in Jackson County when he enlisted in Company B on May 13, 1861.

He was missing in action on July 2, 1863, at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and returned to the regiment on September 19 at Baltimore, Maryland.

Simeon was killed in action on November 30, 1863, at Mine Run, Virginia, although Dan Crotty of Company F wrote some years after the war that Woodard's’ death was the result of his own “carelessness.” It was at Mine Run, wrote Crotty in 1876, “that we lost one of our best soldiers by his own carelessness, Simeon Woodard. When about to relieve a man on the picket line, he commenced to walk out to the post upright. We caution him to creep out, like the other men, but he don't heed our admonitions, so he takes the consequences. He had only moved a few rods when he dropped his gun and put back to the reserve. Sitting down, he drops off a corpse. We soon learn that he received his death wound through the bowels.”

Simeon was buried in Fredericksburg National Cemetery: grave 3691 (old 178).

His parents eventually settled in New Haven, Gratiot County, where they were both living along with a number of their children in 1870 and 1880. In 1886 his mother, was living in Michigan when she applied for and received a pension (no. 336,264).

George Schermerhorn

George Schermerhorn was born in 1839 in Ontario, Canada, the son of Daniel (1804-1887) and Ann (Wall, 1810-1891).

His father was born in New York and married New Brunswick native Ann sometime before 1829, presumably in Canada where they were living by 1829. The family moved to Michigan from Canada sometime between 1846 and 1850 when George was attending school with his siblings and living with his family on a farm in Walker, Kent County. In 1860 George was still working as a farmer and still living with his family in Walker, where his father owned and operated a substantial farm.

George stood 5’11’ with brown eyes, sandy hair and a light complexion and was a 22-year-old farmer living with his family in Walker when he enlisted in Company B on May 13, 1861. He was absent sick at Alexandria, Virginia from October of 1862 until he was discharged on December 28, 1862, at the Third Corps hospital, near Fort Lyon, Virginia, suffering from consumption and chronic diarrhea.

George eventually returned to Walker. He married his first wife Canadian-born Elizabeth Ann Edison (b. 1832) on December 26, 1866, in Grand Rapids, and by 1870 he and Elizabeth were living with her parents on their farm in Walker. He continued farming until about 1872 when he moved into Grand Rapids where he worked for many years as a carpenter and builder.

He was living in Grand Rapids in 1879 when he married his second wife Michigan native Dana Smith Rounds (b. 1843) on January 27, 1879. By 1880 he was working as a carpenter and living with his wife on Canal street in Grand Rapids’ Second Ward; next door was the office of Dr. Walter Morrison who had also served in the Third Michigan as a hospital steward.

In 1878 he applied for and eventually received a pension (no. 324387)

George was still living in Grand Rapids when he was admitted to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 250) on March 10, 1886. He was discharged from the Home on May 15, 1886 as a consequence of “local aid discontinued,” and was residing in Paris, Kent County in 1890; by the following year had returned to Grand Rapids. He was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association (and served as its president in 1890), as well as Grand Army of the Republic Custer post no. 5 in Grand Rapids.

George died of “rheumatism of the heart” at 12:00 (noon?) on December 26, 1891, at his home, 840 Hall street (corner Hall and Salem), in Grand Rapids. According to the Democrat,

Since the war the deceased has suffered ill health almost continuously as a result of disease contracted in the service. For the past 10 years he has suffered acute pain at times, arising from a diseased condition of the bowels. This difficulty of late has been very frequent and excruciating agony has accompanied its recurrence. On Thursday night last the patient had to succumb to his malady and go to bed. His condition steadily grew worse from that time to the moment of his death and the event came as a release from suffering too intense for human endurance. In his lifetime deceased was an active, energetic man. He was congenial in his relations to his fellow men and respected and beloved by a wide circle of friends and acquaintances. He was an honored member of Custer post and during the year ending with Dec. 16 last was president of the Old 3rd Inf. association. He attended the reunion of his Regiment on the date mentioned. The day before Christmas he was down town for the last time.

The funeral was held at the residence on Thursday morning at 10:00 a.m., arranged by Colonel Edwin S. Pierce (formerly of the Old Third). He was buried in Oak Hill cemetery: section D lot 44

At the annual reunion of the association held in December of 1892, the following resolution was read and entered into the records: “Whereas - Shortly after our last reunion, our honored and beloved President Geo Schermerhorn, was by the Supreme ruler called from our midst to join the army of patriots above, Resolved -- that we we deeply regret, that he who we so much loved,. should be taken from us, while yet in the prime of life, and that we extend to his bereaved wife and family our sincere sympathy. That we feel that his wife and all his relatives, as well as ourselves, may feel proud that they have been connected with so good a man, soldier and citizen. That we feel an assurance of the eternal bliss of Geo Schermerhorn, that we cordially invite his wife to consider herself an honorary member of the” association. She did.

In 1892 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 336978).

Robert Musgrove - updated 1/14/2017

Robert Musgrove was born on January 19, 1845, in Canada, the son of Irish-born James (1812-1873) and English-born Charlotte Brunson (1813-1861).

By 1839 the family was possibly living in Albright, New York (or they may not have left Ireland until after 1845). By 1843 when their daughter Charlotte was born they were probably in Ohio, were almost certainly in Ontario Canada in 1850 when Melissa was born. By 1851 they were living in Mersea, Ontario, Canada. and wee in Canada in 1853 and 1856 when their children Betsey and William were born. James eventually settled in Ionia County, Michigan and by 1860 Robert was living with his family in Odessa, Ionia County.

Robert stood 5’11” with black eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion and was a 19-year-old farmer probably living in Otisco, Ionia County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company E on February 9, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Otisco, and was mustered the same day. He joined the Regiment on March 29, was absent sick from June 1, and was probably still absent sick with chronic diarrhea when he was transferred to Company E, 5th Michigan Infantry upon consolidation of the 3rd and 5th Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. Robert entered Chester hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on June 30, and was discharged on July 17 at Philadelphia from Company A, 20th Veterans Reserve Corps (VRC).

Robert returned to Michigan after his discharge.

He married Michigan native Mary J. (1843-1880) and they had at least child, a son (b. 1872).

By 1870 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife in South Cass, Odessa Township, Ionia County. His brother or cousin (?) James Musgrove (b. 1840 in New York), was living nearby with his family. By 1880 Robert was working as a farmer and listed as a widower (his wife Mary had died of a fever on May 2, 1880) and living in Odessa; also living with him was a 20-year-old Ohio-born laborer named Umer Shocky.

In 1881 Robert married his second wife, Michigan native Lycia Allen (1858-1923), and they had at least three children: Ruby (b. 1883), Robert W. (b. 1889), Leland Clare. (b. 1897) and William (b. 1904). (It appears that Lycia or Lucy as she was also known might have been married previously to Franklin Gilbert in 1875 in Berlin, Ionia County. Oddly enough in 1880 she was listed as Lycia Allen, married and working as a servant for the Harris family in Saranac, Ionia County.)

Robert was living in Bonanza, Ionia County in 1888 and in Lake Odessa in 1900 along with his wife Lucy and three children. By 1889 he was in Lake Odessa, Ionia County where he still living in 1894. He was living in Lake Odessa in 1889, 1890, 1894, from 1906-11. Indeed he probably lived nearly all of his life in Odessa.

In 1910 Robert was living alone in Lake Odessa but listed himself as married and that he had been married for 29 years. In fact, it appears that he and Lucy separated, probably sometime after William was born and by 1910 Lucy and her two sons were living in Keene, Ionia County. By 1920 Lucy was listed as the head of the household living in Ruby, Elko County, Nevada, along with her sons Leland and William.

Sometime after 1910 Robert married his third wife Martha Belle Unger (1856-1945). She had been married twice before: to Alvin Meyers in 1882 and she was a widow when she married John King in 1890. It appears that Belle and John King were divorced but that remains unconfirmed. It also remains unconfirmed what the status was at the time of the third marriage between Robert and Lucy; she was still using his last name in 1920.

By 1920 Robert was living with his wife Belle in Lake Odessa. He was still living in Lake Odessa in 1922-23 and in 1930 when he was worth about $1800.

In 1877 Robert applied for and received a pension (no. 414642). He was one of the six surviving members of the Old 3rd Michigan Infantry Association who attended the final reunion of the association held in Grand Rapids in June of 1927.

Robert died of “myocardial senility” on February 21, 1932, in Lake Odessa and was buried in Lakeside cemetery, Lake Odessa: section 2, lot no. 98, next to his first wife Mary.

Thomas Griffin

Thomas Griffin was born 1834 in Canada.

Thomas came to the United States from Canada sometime before the war broke out, eventually settling in western Michigan.

He stood 5’11” with blue eyes, black hair and a light complexion, and was a 27-year-old lumberman probably living in Muskegon County when he enlisted in Company H on May 13, 1861. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.) On July 1, 1862, he was admitted to one of the hospitals in Alexandria, suffering from consumption, and was discharged on August 18, 1862, at Fairfax Seminary hospital, Virginia, on account of “advanced” consumption, in the “last stage.” According to his discharge paper he had been “off duty 4 1/2 months.”

It seems that Thomas never left Virginia, however. He died of consumption, on either August 24, 1862, or March 19, 1864, at Alexandria, Virginia, and was buried at Alexandria National Cemetery: section A, grave no. 904-9.

No pension record seems to be available.

John Foulks

John Foulks, also known as “Folks,” was born November 6, 1841, in Brant, Ontario, Canada, son of William F. (1816-1889) and Jane (Renwick, b. 1819).

John’s father emigrated from England to America around 1832, settling in Ontario, Canada. He met New York native Jane Renwick and they were married on March 17, 1841, in Ontario, and they eventually settled in Brant, Ontario. Around 1856 William moved his family to Ionia County, Michigan, settling in Keene Township. In 1860 John was attending school with five of his siblings and living on the family farm in Keene. (John’s mother was probably related to the several Renwick families who also lived in Keene before the war; two of whom served in the Third Michigan.)

William was a member of the Democratic party, “and in local affairs was in favor of all progressive movements. In every relation in life he made his mark as an upright and successful man. He was a man of integrity and principle, and he believed in treating others as he desired himself to be treated.” When he died he “left a fine estate of one hundred and twenty acres, the result of a life of labor and industry. He was a man of extensive general information, well known for his liberality to all good and charitable enterprises and an obliging neighbor. He had a keen sense of honor and his integrity was never questioned.”

John stood 6’1” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion, and was a 21-year-old farmer possibly living in Keene, Ionia County when he enlisted in Company D on February 12, 1862, at Saranac, Ionia County for 3 years, crediting Ionia County, and was mustered the same day; he was probably related to the Renwick brothers who also enlisted in Company D. (Company D was composed in large part of men who came from western Ionia County and Eaton County.)

John apparently spent little time with the Regiment, however. He was absent sick from August through December of 1862, and absent sick in Alexandria, Virginia from October of 1863 through December. He was sick in Washington, DC, from January of 1864 through May, and was still absent sick when he was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was discharged at the expiration of his term of service at Detroit on either February 9 or 14, 1865.

After his discharge from the army John returned to Keene where he worked for many years as a farmer. His parents were living on a farm next door to the Renwicks in Keene in 1870; they were still living in Keene in 1880. By 1880 John was working as a barber, listed himself as single and living at the Young Hotel in Lowell, Kent County. John was living in Keene in 1890.

Apparently John was married at one time since he noted himself as a widower upon admission to the Michigan Soldier's Home. He was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association and he received pension no. 934,709.

He was admitted as a widower to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 2292) on November 26, 1894, and worked as a barber, presumably at the Home.

John died of paralysis of the lower extremities on March 10, 1905, at the Home, and was buried in the Home cemetery: block 4 row 17 grave 29.

Aaron F. Farr - updated 16 August 2016

Aaron F. Farr was born around 1832, in Niagara, Ontario, Canada, probably the son of Canadians John (1805) and Mary (1804).

In 1851 Aaron was working as a sawyer, probably for his father who was a lumberman, and living with his family in Houghton, Norfolk County, Ontario. He eventually left Canada and moved to western Michigan. By 1860 he was probably working as a mill laborer and living with the Adams family in Tallmadge, Ottawa County.

Aaron stood 5’6” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion, and was 25 years old and possibly living in Tallmadge, Ottawa County when he enlisted in Company B on May 13, 1861. He was present for duty from January of 1862 through April, and absent sick at the hospital in Yorktown, Virginia on April 1, 1862 suffering from “piles” (hemorrhoids). He was eventually treated at Judiciary Square hospital in Washington, DC, and reported absent sick in the hospital at the corner of 6th and D Streets and in the 8th Street hospital in Washington, DC, from June 3, 1862, through July and August. According to one source, he was wounded at the Battle of Fair Oaks, Virginia, on May 31, 1862, and put aboard the Elm City at White House Landing, Virginia, and transferred to the hospital in Washington, DC, where he arrived on June 5 or 6.

Aaron was dropped from the company rolls on September 21, 1862, in compliance with G.O. no. 92 (regarding deserters), for having allegedly deserted on September 21, 1862, at Upton’s Hill, Virginia. Although he was probably in the hospital in September, his military service record notes that the “charge of desertion not to be removed and [that he be given] no honorable discharge.” Apparently there was no record of his having been absent sick or wounded at the time he was reported as a deserter. Of course, he may have deserted from the hospital, although there is no record confirming one way or the other.

After his discharge from the army Aaron probably returned to Ontario, Canada.

In June of 1888 he was apparently back in Michigan living in Waters, Otsego County when he applied for a pension (application no. 660,904). His application was rejected, however, “on the grounds that the claimant deserted and never returned to his command and for the reason that an application for removal of charge of desertion and for an honorable discharge in the case has been denied.”

Two months later, in August of 1888, Aaron was back in Houghton, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada, suffering, he claimed in a letter to the pension commissioner, from piles so bad that he had had to quit work as a laborer and leave Otsego.

Aaron died of kidney and bladder disease on September 15, 1889 in Norfolk, Ontario, Canada.

Charles Eddy - updated 2/28/09

Charles Eddy was born March 11, 1840 in Scotland, Ontario, Canada, the son of Constant (1817-1892) and Ann (Emmons, 1817-1859).

Charles’s parents were both born in Canada and married around 1837, probably in Scotland, Ontario where they were both born. They resided in Scotland for the remainder of their lives. Charles immigrated to the United States and by 1860 he was working as a farm laborer for Winfield Fuller, a farmer in Grattan, Kent County, Michigan, and probably living with (and/or working for another Grattan farmer by the name of Uriah Emmons, who was also from Ontario, Canada.

Charles stood 5’5” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion, and was 21 years old and possibly living in Grand Rapids or Grattan when he enlisted in Company K on May 13, 1861, probably with Dave Emmons, having worked for Emmons’ father in Grattan. He was treated for typhoid fever during the latter two weeks of August of 1861.

Charles was a cattle guard in January of 1863, and was treated for gonorrhea September 24, 25 and 29, 1863. He reenlisted on December 24, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Cannon, Kent County. He was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864 and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February.

He was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and wounded by a gunshot in the left shoulder on October 27, 1864 at Boydton Plank road, near Petersburg, Virginia. He was probably hospitalized and reported absent sick from December of 1864 until he was discharged on May 31, 1865, at Detroit.

After his discharge from the army Charles returned to Grattan. He was probably living in Grattan when he married Michigan native Clara A. Close (1847-1930) on October 16, 1865; they had at least four (and probably five) children: Connor or Converse (b. 1869), Laura, Lilla and Harold.

By 1868-69, he was living in Grand Rapids working as a shoemaker for Small & Moseby and boarding on the east side of Waterloo between Louis and Ferry Streets, but was listed as a dry goods merchant living with his wife and son in Grattan, Kent County in 1870.

Charles was still in Grattan in 1879 and was operating a general store in Grattan in 1880 and living with his wife and two children, but by 1884 he was probably working in the Eddy & Huntley general store in Petoskey, Michigan. By 1892 and 1894 he was back in Grattan, and was apparently living in Belding’s First ward, Ionia County in 1894 and in Belding in 1911. He and Clara were living in Belding in 1920; also living with them was a niece, Kitty Lester.

Charles was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, as well as a member of Grand Army of the Republic Dan Root Post No. 126 in Belding, and he received pension no. 58,085, drawing $2.66 per month in 1883 for a wounded left shoulder, and $72 per month by 1925.

Charles died of malnutrition resulting from senility died on September 1, 1925, probably in or near Belding, and was buried in River Ridge cemetery, Otisco, Ionia County: section 2, lot no. 1.

His widow applied for and received a pension (no. 966585).

Isaac Duvernay

Isaac Duvernay, also known as “Dirwiney”, “Deriveney”, “Derweeney” or “Derverney”, born 1833 along the Chippewa river, in Canada or Wisconsin, the son of Pierre (1790-1862) and Mi-ne-de-mo-e-yah (also known as Julia or Julie, between 1797 and 1799).

French Canadian Pierre married “Julia”, who was born in the Lake Superior area of Wisconsin (possibly Lac du Flambeau), on July 30, 1830 in Mackinac City, Michigan. It appears that Pierre was a trapper working the rivers in upper Wisconsin and Canada, particularly the Chippewa River where a number of their children were born.

In any case About 1834 or 1835 Pierre settled his family in Grand Haven, Ottawa County, Michigan, and was closely identified with the Presbyterian church in Grand Haven, serving as its first ruling elder. One source rported that “In 1835 the Duvernays built their home on Lot 55 on the south side of Franklin [30 Franklin], midway between Harbor and First Streets, where in 1837 Pierre sold Indian blankets, fabric, salt, whitefish, cranberries, and maple syrup products.” In 1837 he operated a small store at the foot of Franklin Street in Grand Haven, selling “Indian blankets, blue broadcloth and calicos; also barrels of salt whitefish and siskowit, mococks of maple sugar and cranberries.” Pierre was still living in Grand Haven in 1840 and in fact would live the rest of his life in the Grand Haven area.

In 1850 Isaac was working as a laborer and living with his family in Grand Haven where his father worked as a trader. By 1860 Pierre (listed as “Peter” in the census records) was working as an “indian trader” and living with his family in Grand Haven. Pierre died in 1862 in Grand Haven.

Isaac stood 5’9” with black eyes, black hair and a dark complexion and was a 29-year-old sailor possibly living in Grand Haven, Ottawa County when he enlisted in Company I on February 22, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Ottawa County, and was mustered on February 27 at Detroit. (Company I was made up largely of men from Ottawa County, particularly from the eastern side of the County.)

He joined the Regiment on August 27 at Upton’s Hill, Virginia, and was transferred to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. Isaac was a Corporal when he was wounded severely and taken prisoner at Boydton Plank road, near Petersburg, Virginia, on October 27, 1864. He was subsequently confined in prison at Salisbury, North Carolina where he apparently died of chronic diarrhea on February 16, 1865.

According to the U.S. Quartermaster General’s “Roll of Honor”, he was buried in an unknown grave in Salisbury, no. 914.

In about 1866 his mother applied for and received a pension (no 83550). His mother was buried in Lake Forest cemetery in Grand Haven.

John F. Crysler - updated 11/25/08

John F. Crysler was born in 1842 in Ontario, Canada, the son of Jeremiah (1811-1887) and Rhoda Matilda (Ford, 1820)

Ontario, Canadian natives Jeremiah and Rhoda were married on April 20, 1841, in Ontario, Canada and resided there for many years. Sometime between 1843 and 1844 (or possibly as late as 1852) they left Canada and eventually settled in Michigan. By 1860 John was attending school with five of his younger siblings and living on the family farm in Sparta, Kent County. (Nearby lived Levi Tanner who would also enlist in the Third Michigan.)

John was a 20-year-old farmer probably living in Sparta, Kent County when he enlisted with his father’s consent in Company K on August 9, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and joined the Regiment on September 8 at Upton’s Hill, Virginia. He died of typhoid fever on May 31 or June 1, 1863, and, according to George Bailey, of Company F who had been temporarily assigned as Regimental hospital steward, he died in the Regimental hospital at Falmouth, Virginia. (He may have been buried initially on the Bullard Farm in Stafford County, Virginia.) John was eventually interred in Fredericksburg National Cemetery: grave no. 5021 (old 127).

His parents soon left Michigan and by 1870 had settled in Marine Mills, Washington County, Minnesota. By 1880 they had moved to Big Bend, Republic County, Kansas where Jeremiah died in 1887. (He is buried in Rose Mound Cemetery in Big Bend.) In 1888 John’s mother Rhoda mother was living in Nebraska when she applied for and received a pension (no. 248,775). Sometime between 1900 and 1910 Rhode went to live with her daughter Florence Vickers, in Billings, Montana. She died in Billings in 1914 and her body was sent to White Bear Lake, Ramsey County, Minnesota and buried at Saint John’s cemetery in White Bear Lake. (Apparently her daughter Hester or Esther had settled there with her husband William Freeman.)

Lyman Noble. Crandall - update 1/28/2017

Lyman Noble Crandall was born June 21, 1841, in Ontario, Canada, the son of New York natives John Crandall and Jerusha Maria Noble (b. 1814).

John and Jerusha were married on August 7, 1831. By 1851 Lyman was living with his family in Bayham, Elgin County, Ontario. Lyman left Canada, probably in the late 1850s, and moved to America. By 1860 he was a farm laborer living with and/or working for William Calles in Hinton, Mecosta County.

Lyman was 19 years old and probably residing in Newaygo County when he enlisted with the consent of the Justice of the Peace in Company K on May 13, 1861; his brother Perry Crandall, enlisted in Company H. On July 13, 1862, Lyman wrote to his friend George Nellis in the 10th Michigan caval

ry, from Harrison’s Landing, Virginia. “Well we have had some hard times since we left Yorktown. We have had one fight at Fair Oaks and then when we started on this retreat for we had Seven Days fighting. Our Regiment covered the retreat with a very little loss. Well it is of no use for me to try to tell the fortunes of the battle for I cannot. Well you must excuse my short letter for it is time to blow out the light for the taps has been beaten and the lights must now darken for that is orders. Perry [of Company H and probably his brother] is well and he sends his respects to you and the rest of the family.”

Lyman was a guard at Corps headquarters from May of 1863 through July, in August was reported to be “driving cattle” and in September he was on detached service at Third Corps headquarters, probably with the Brigade Commissary, where he remained until he deserted from Third Corps headquarters perhaps in October of 1863, or while “in the field” on December 23, 1863. There is no further record.

Lyman returned to his home in Canada.

He was probably living in Bayham, Ontario when he married Canadian (Quebec) native Mary J. Turner (b. 1845), on April 17, 1864, in Tilsonburg, Ontario. Sometime before 1861, and they had at least four children: Mary (b. 1861), Milton (b. 1865) and Franklin (b. 1868) and Robert D. (b. 1875).

Sometime after 1868 Lyman moved his family to Michigan (his first three children were all born in Canada). By 1870 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife and three children in Vassar, Fremont Township, Tuscola County. He was working as a farmer and living with his family in Fremont in 1880. (His brother Perry and his family were also living in Vassar in 1880.)

No pension seems to be available. (Probably as a consequence of the charge of desertion.)

Lyman died in 1886, presumably in Tuscola County, and was buried in Fremont Township cemetery, Mayville, Tuscola County.

His widow was residing in Fremont, Tuscola County in 1890. She remarried to Ephraim Deamud in 1896.

William S. Corlis

William S. Corlis, also known as “Corliss” or “Joseph Coffee,” was born around 1838 in Dumfries, Ontario, Canada.

William left Canada and moved to the United States sometime before 1860 when he was working as a farm laborer for one John Koum (?) and his family in Vergennes, Kent County. (Next door lived George Woodruff who would also enlist in Company A, Third Michigan, in February of 1862.)

William stood 5’10’ with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion, and was a 24-year-old farmer possibly living in Kent County when he enlisted in Company A on February 28, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered the same day. In April of 1863 he was reported as a nurse in the Regimental hospital, and was slightly wounded in early May of 1864. He was transferred as a Corporal to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and mustered out as a Sergeant on March 5, 1865, at Petersburg, Virginia.

William eventually returned to Michigan, and by 1888 was living in Marine City, St. Clair County.

He was married to Malinda J.

William was living in Illinois in 1891 when he applied for and received a pension (no. 650405). (In 1910 there was one William S. Corlis, born around 1834, living in Sidney, Champaign County, Illinois.)

William died on September 23, 1912 (?), possibly in Illinois and is presumably buried there.

His widow was living in Illinois in 1912 (?) when she applied for and received a pension (no. 716,961 ).

Gilbert Cooley

Gilbert Cooley was born around 1837 in Ontario, Canada.

Gilbert left Canada and eventually settled in the United States. He may have been the same Canadian-born Gilbert Cooley, age 24, who was working as a farm laborer for a wealthy lumberman named William Smith in Emmet, St. Clair County in 1860. In any case, by the time the war broke out Gilbert was probably working as a lumberman in Grand Haven, Ottawa County.

Gilbert stood 5’10” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion, and was 25 years old when he enlisted in Company I on August 22, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Ottawa, Ottawa County, and was mustered on August 27 at Detroit. (Company I was made up largely of men from Ottawa County, particularly from the eastern side of the County.) He joined the Regiment on September 27 at Upton’s Hill, Virginia. He was reported missing in action on May 2, 1863, at Chancellorsville, Virginia, and in fact he was taken prisoner on May 2 or 3 and paroled on May 14 at City Point, Virginia. He was sent to Camp Parole, Maryland on May 16, then on to Detroit and from Detroit Barracks to Camp Chase, Ohio on June 5 where he reported on June 6, 1863.

Gilbert had been promoted to Corporal by the time he returned (officially) to the Regiment on October 31 1863, and was on detached service driving an ambulance, and in November he was reported as an exchanged prisoner recuperating at the convalescent camp in Alexandria, Virginia, where he remained absent sick from December through January, 1864. It is quite possible that he reenlisted on January 1, 1864; if so he was probably absent on veteran’s furlough in January or February of 1864 and probably returned to the Regiment sometime in February or early March.

Gilbert was taken prisoner on June 2, 1864, at Gaines’ Mills, Virginia, confined at Richmond on June 3, and sent to Andersonville, Georgia on June. He was transferred as missing in action since May 31, 1864, to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and admitted to the Andersonville prison hospital on October 8 where he died of dysentery on October 11, 1864. He was buried in Andersonville National Cemetery: grave no. 10,644.

No pension seems to be available.

Robert Connor

Robert Connor was born 1836 in Hinsform, Quebec, Canada.

Robert eventually moved to the United States, and had settled in western Michigan by 1860 when he was working as a laborer and residing at Samuel Matery’s hotel in Brooks, Newaygo County.

Robert stood 5’11” with blue eyes, dark hair and a fair complexion, and was 25 years old and living in Newaygo or Muskegon County when he enlisted in the “Muskegon Rangers” -- which would soon become Company H -- on April 28, 1861, in Muskegon. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers”, was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.) He was reported sick in the hospital from October of 1862 until he was discharged on November 18, 1862, from the Third Corps hospital near Fort Lyon, Virginia, for a fracture of the arm, which had occurred prior to enlistment.

No pension seems to be available.

James Cavanaugh

James Cavanaugh was born November 27, 1832, on Grand Menan Island in the Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick, Canada, the son of William (b. 1807) and Nancy (Starr).

In 1826 William moved from Tyrone, Ireland to St. Johns, New Brunswick, followed shortly afterward by his wife Nancy. In 1837, when James was five years old, the family moved to New York City, “where in early childhood he attended the common schools and received his primary education.” He was apprenticed at the age of 13 years to a morocco leather manufacturer, and he worked at that trade until 1851 or 1852, during which time he acquired “the details of a trade in which he became an acknowledged expert and a craftsman of more than ordinary skill. He perfected a system for the tanning and dressing of lambskins and the manufacturing of white kid gloves, and brought both art and science to bear upon the complicated business.”

James moved to Detroit, Michigan, in 1851 or 1852, “and on account of his health abandoned his former occupation and engaged in business as a carpenter and ship-joiner.”

He married Michigan native Annie L. Nolan (b. 1833) in 1856, and they had at least eight children: Mary V. (b. 1858; Mrs. J. E. Dooly), Mrs. Elizabeth “Lizzie J.” Genter (b. 1860), William S. (b. 1862), James (b. 1864), Katie (b. 1867, Mrs. Kate Gray or Talley), Charles (b. 1869), Frank, Frederick L. (d. 1903), and Lewis.

James continued to work as a carpenter in the Detroit area until 1857, when he and his wife to Grand Rapids. Upon arriving in Grand Rapids James resumed his trade of carpentry, and in 1859-60 he was working as a carpenter and residing at the southeast corner of Fourth and Broadway in Grand Rapids (west side), By 1860 he was a carpenter living with his wife and one child in Grand Rapids' Fourth Ward; he may also have served as city marshal in 1860.

Sometime during 1860 he joined the Valley City Guard, a local militia company in Grand Rapids, which would serve as the nucleus of Company A, the first company to be organized in the Third Michigan regiment in April of 1861. In fact, James was quite possibly promoted to Third Sergeant of the VCG sometime in early 1861.

In any case, he stood 5’8” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was 28 years old and probably working as a carpenter in Grand Rapids when he enlisted as Second Sergeant in Company A. on May 13, 1861. (Company A was made up largely of men from Grand Rapids, and many of whom had served in various local militia units before the war, specifically the Valley City Guards, or VCG, under the command of Captain Samuel Judd, who would also command Company A.)

According to George Miller of Company A, Cavanaugh was Orderly Sergeant by November of 1861 and had gone home to Michigan, along with Captain Charles Lyon of Company K, in order to recruit for the Regiment over the winter.

James soon returned to the Regiment, however, and, George Miller wrote on January 27, 1862, “Our worthy friend Cavanaugh returned (from recruiting in Michigan) to camp before yesterday.” While Cavanaugh had been in Michigan, Miller added rather cryptically, he had seen George’s father who asked how things were in the Regiment. Cavanaugh “told him a big lie. He said he did not want him to know the worst, but he was joking, I guess.” Soon after his return to the Regiment Cavanaugh resigned his commission and was discharged for an “oblique inguinal hernia on the left side occasioned since enlistment” on January 31, 1862 at Camp Michigan, Virginia.

James returned to Michigan where he reentered the service as Captain in Company B, Twenty-first Michigan infantry at the organization of that unit on July 16, 1862, at Detroit for 3 years. The regiment was organized at Ionia and Grand Rapids and mustered into service on September 9., and left Michigan for Louisville, Kentucky, on September 12. James was serving with the Regiment during the battle of Perryville, Kentucky on October 8, 1862, and he also claimed in later years to have been with the Regiment at the battle of Stone’s River (Murfreesboro), Tennessee. In any event, by the end of November he had been promoted to Brigade Inspector, and was on duty attending a general court martial at Nashville, Tennessee, from November of 1862 through February of 1863. He resigned on account of disability on March 26, 1863.

After his discharge from the army James returned to his home in Grand Rapids sometime in early April, and was appointed Assistant Provost Marshal of Grand Rapids in 1863 (having served briefly as city marshal just before the war). By 1865-66 he was working in the sash-and-blind industry at 53 Ionia Street but soon afterwards moved to Muskegon, Muskegon County where he lived out the remainder of his life. Upon arriving in Muskegon James joined in partnership with Patrick Ducey and D. Kelly to manufacture sashes, doors and blinds in the Muskegon area, and in 1869 he was instrumental in organizing the Muskegon fire department and remained as head of the department until 1880.

In 1875 James was appointed superintendent of the Muskegon water works and remained in that position until 1882, when he became involved in the saw-milling industry. In 1878 he sold his interest in sash-and-blind business and became variously employed, working at one time for the Monroe Manufacturing Company of Muskegon. By 1880 James was working as the Superintendent of Water works and living with his wife and children in Muskegon’s Second Ward.

In May of 1883 he joined the Grand Army of the Republic Phil Kearny Post No. 7 in Muskegon, and at one time served as post commander; and in 1888 he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association.

By 1894 he was residing in the Fifth Ward in 1894. “Mr. and Mrs. Cavanaugh,” noted one source, “are devout members of the Catholic Church and are liberal givers in behalf of religious work and benevolent enterprise. The pleasant home is upon Terrace Street and is a most attractive residence, of modern design and handsomely furnished.” James was also a Democrat.

James died a widower, of “La Grippe” (influenza) in Muskegon on February 18, 1907, and was buried in St. Mary’s cemetery in Muskegon.

John G. Byrns

John G. Byrns was born 1843 in Canada, the son of David (b. 1801) and Charlotte (b. 1817).

Both of his parents were Canadian natives and were probably married in Canada sometime before 1841. The family lived in Canada for some years before immigrating to the United States, eventually settling in Michigan sometime between 1853 and 1857. By 1860 John was probably attending school with his siblings and living with his family in Grand Rapids’ Third Ward, Kent County, where his father worked as a shoemaker and shoe dealer.

John was 18 years old and probably still living in Kent County when he enlisted with his parents’ consent in Company A on May 13, 1861. Although he was reported to have deserted sometime around June 1, 1862 at Washington, DC, he was also reported on furlough in July of 1862, and in fact, he had returned home to Grand Rapids where he married Mary Smith on June 28, 1862.

The remaining details of Byrns’ service remain unclear. Colonel Stephen Champlin, who was commanding the Third Regiment in the summer of 1862, was himself home in Michigan on furlough after being wounded at Fair Oaks, Virginia, on May 31, 1862, and notified Michigan Adjutant General John Robertson in Detroit that “A young man named Byrnes . . . is showing a certificate recommending him to a commission with my name attached.” He informed the Adjutant General that “If he should show such to Gov. [Austin] Blair [of Michigan], please assure the gov. that the same is a forgery.”

Sergeant Charles Wright of Company A, discussed Byrns’ character at some length in a letter he wrote home in early 1863.

I have heard [Wright wrote home on February 23] of the arrest and confinement of one John Byrns in your city [Grand Rapids]. He was formerly of my company and after the battle of Fair Oaks (in which he was not a participant) he deserted and has never been heard from until now. He always was set down by the boys as a coward and we all know he is a thief. The day before the battle of Fair Oaks he was detailed to go to the rear and across the Chickahominy and guard our knapsacks which had been previously sent back in anticipation of a battle. He robbed some of the knapsacks of clothing and found other articles which were afterwards found with him. So he pretended to be wounded after the battle, and got passage to Washington. There he waited upon Cap. Geo. Judd, and in a few days forged a furlough and deserted. Now if it is so they have got him locked up in jail at Grand Rapids, I hope he may be sent here to be punished; such a mean . . . coward deserves punishment at the hands of his own officers and men. I know all the boys would like to see his head shaved and the letter D branded upon him, for even that would a light punishment, for such a coward as he.

There is, however, no public record of Byrns’s trial or confinement in Grand Rapids, nor is there any further record of his military service or postwar life, and no pension seems to be available.

There was one John Byrns, a resident of Chicago, who enlisted as a Sergeant on July 25, 1862 in Company A, Seventy-second Illinois infantry, and subsequently deserted on December 31, 1862. He was at one point reduced to the ranks as a Private. There was also a“John Byrns”, who enlisted as a Private on March 26, 1863, in Unassigned, Twelfth Pennsylvania cavalry. Again, there is no further record.

In any case, there are no further details on his family nor do we know of what became of his wife Mary.

Isaac Burbank

Isaac Burbank was born 1828 in Canada.

Both of Isaac’s parents were born in Canada.

Isaac left Canada and immigrated to the United States. By 1850 he had settled in Crockery, Ottawa County, Michigan where he worked as a carpenter and lived with the family of Dr. Charles Kibbey in Crockery. Also living with the Kibbey family that year was 12-year-old New York native Madora McMann and her two younger siblings.

Isaac married 13-year-old Madora McMann (1838-1911) on Christmas Day, 1851, in Crockery, Ottawa County; they had at least seven children: twins Annie and Willie, Charles (1853-1869), Mary (b. 1857), possibly another son Freddie, and a son Richard (b. 1861).

By 1860 Isaac was working as a carpenter and living with his wife and children in Crockery Township, Ottawa County. (Next door lived Thomas Somerset and his family; Thomas would also join the Third Michigan.)

Isaac was 29 years old and possibly living in Kent County or Crockery when he enlisted in Company F on May 13, 1861. In July of 1861 he reportedly injured his left thumb and was suffering from lung disease at Arlington Heights, Virginia. He was subsequently hospitalized for two months at Union hospital in Georgetown, and discharged for consumption on September 10, 1861, at Camp Arlington, Virginia.

Following his discharge from the army Isaac returned to Crockery where he reentered the service as Sergeant in Company F, Fourteenth Michigan infantry on December 7, 1861, for 3 years, crediting and listing Crockery as his place of residence, and was mustered the same day. The regiment was formally organized at Ypsilanti, Washtenaw County, and Detroit between January 7 and February 18, 1862, ands was mustered into service on February 13. It left Michigan for St. Louis, Missouri, on April 17 and then on to Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee. It subsequently participated in numerous actions and operations in northern Mississippi and northern Alabama. It marched to Nashville, Tennessee, September 1-6 and was on duty there until December 26; it participated in the siege of Nashville September 12-November 7 but by January 2 it was guarding supply trains near Murfreesboro, Tennessee. It remained there until March at it was at Brentwood guarding the rail line between Nashville and Franklin until early July.

For reasons unknown, Isaac was apparently reduced to the ranks, and he was reported as a Corporal and sick in Nashville, Tennessee on April 23, 1863. He was taken sick in July of 1863 suffering from fever and was sent to the regimental hospital where he remained about four weeks. After he recovered he was assigned on detail to cook for the officers but apparently continued to suffer from frequent attacks of illness sometimes lasting several days at a time.

The regiment was on duty at Nashville, Franklin and Columbia until May of 1864. In any case, Isaac reenlisted on January 4, 1864, at Franklin, Tennessee, and was mustered in as a reenlisted veteran on February 5 following his return from Michigan, where he had gone presumably on a veterans’ furlough. The Fourteenth participated in the Atlanta campaign from June to September of 1864, in the March to the Sea November 15-December 10 and the siege of Savannah December 10-21 and in the Campaign in the Carolinas January to April of 1865. It was also involved in the battle of Bentonville, North Carolina March 19-21, in the occupation of Goldsboro and Raleigh, North Carolina and the surrender of Johnston’s army. It subsequently marched to Washington April 29-May19 and participate d in the Grand Review on May 24, after which it was moved to Louisville, Kentucky on June 13. Isaac was mustered out with the regiment on July 18, 1865, at Louisville, Kentucky.

After the war Isaac returned to his home in Ottawa County. By 1870 he was working as a carpenter and he was living with his wife and two children in Spring Lake, Ottawa County, and he was still working as a carpenter and living with his wife and children in Spring Lake in 1880. In fact, Isaac and his wife lived in Spring Lake, Ottawa County where she ran a confectionery shop and restaurant on Main Street and he worked as a carpenter until he was injured in January of 1881. Apparently he had cut his thumb on a piece of glass and gangrene set in and he nearly lost his arm.

He was living in Muskegon the following year when he contracted a lung disease and was reported to be in an emaciated condition when he entered the Michigan Soldiers’ Home for the first time on January 25, 1886 (no. 197). In his admission to the Home in 1886 he stated that he was married but that his nearest relative was a son and son-in-law (the latter probably Loren Beerman), although he also reported one Madora Burbank as dependent upon his support but he did not describe the nature of the relationship.

Isaac was discharged from the Home at his own request on January 16, 1887, and readmitted on May 19, 1888, discharged on November 9, 1888, when he returned to his home in Muskegon. He was admitted to the Michigan Soldiers' Home a third time on April 22, 1889 and discharged June 27, 1892 and was reportedly suffering from “general debility since the war” and paralysis. He was admitted a fourth time on January 5, 1893 and discharged on January 16, 1897; and admitted a fifth time on June 28, 1897 and discharged for the last time on April 5, 1898. During this period he would return to his wife’s home in either Ottawa or Muskegon County.

Sometime in November of 1900 until the spring of 1902 the two of them occupied two separate but adjoining rooms in the Rice block in Muskegon, Muskegon County.

In late summer of 1903 Madora served notice to the pension bureau that Isaac had deserted and abandoned her in May of 1902.

According to testimony he moved his furniture out of the Rice block without telling her and moved elsewhere in the city. He also attempted to have her committed to the Northern Michigan Insane Asylum (evidence of which attempt was a matter of public record as was the censure which Isaac was given in court for attempting such a thing to a person who was in fact not insane.)

On October 7, 1903, just a few weeks before Isaac died, Madora was living at 7 Miller Street in Muskegon when she wrote to the pension bureau seeking to access a share of his pension money. “I have been sick,” she wrote, “ and not able to do much when he left me the last time & I was sick he was gone over a week. I can’t just remember. He left me so many times. He always found a home ready for him. When I was able to work I never complained nor asked him for help until for the last year it is abuse I get he is so miserly.” She went on to describe how he often stays elsewhere in his own room and does his own cooking and that since her son died and her daughter married “that left me no home. He never has taken care of me nor his 7 children” and that when their third child was born she had to go home to her mother’s house to be cared for. She also claimed that he left her on May 16, 1902 and subsequently “served papers on me to put me in the insane asylum as an indigent insane person”.

In early November of 1903 Loren Beerman, who was living on Jefferson Street in Muskegon, testified that

About 1882 [Isaac] came to [his] house and said that his wife had ordered him to leave; that he went to [Madora] personally to bring about a reconciliation, but that she was very emphatic in her statement that she would never allow him to live with her again, and he does not think she has ever cohabited with [Isaac since]; that she has never acted the part of a wife to him, but on the contrary she has done everything imaginable to make life miserable for him; that part of the time they have boarded in the same house but have not eaten at the same table nor slept in the same room; that [Isaac] is not responsible for this estrangement; that he knows of his own knowledge that for the last fifteen years [Isaac] has contributed steadily all he could to his wife’s support, and he is still doing so; that [Isaac] has paid him for her board and has been responsible for her bills; that [he] would be willing to live with her if she would permit him; that no one could possibly live with her in any place.

Isaac was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, and he received pension no. 419416 (dated September of 1883), drawing $12.00 per month when he was admitted to the Home in 1886 and increased to $30.00 as early as 1889.

Isaac died on December 13, 1903, of a stomach abscess at his daughter’s (Annie?) home in Muskegon, and the funeral was held at her home under the auspices of Grand Army of the Republic Kearny Post No. 7 (Muskegon). He was buried in Oakwood cemetery in Muskegon: range 13, block 15, lot 2.

In his obituary there is no mention of a widow.

Nevertheless, in December of 1903 his widow was granted a pension (no. 570852), drawing $12 per month. She died the following November but was not buried alongside Isaac. She was buried in Spring Lake in 1911 alongside five of her children.

William Bryce - updated 03/17/09

William Bryce was born May 10, 1835, in Warwick, Ontario, Canada, the son of James (d. 1871) and Elizabeth (d. 1902).

William’s parents were married on May 21, 1834, in Adelaide, Canada. Sometime after 1835 William’s family left Canada and came to the United States, and eventually settled in Brockaway, St. Clair County, Michigan. By 1860 William himself was working as a laborer for a wealthy lumberman named Wesley Armstrong in Hume, Huron County.

He stood 5’10” with gray eyes, brown hair and a light complexion, and was a 26-year-old laborer possibly living in Hume Township, Huron County when he enlisted in Company G on June 10, 1861, three days before the regiment left for Virginia. In March of 1862 the regiment left its winter quarters, along with the rest of the Army of the Potomac, and southward from near Alexandria, Virginia, eventually disembarking from the transports near Fortress Monroe, on the tip of the “Virginia Peninsula”. On March 26, William wrote home to his father

I received your letter and was glad to hear from you. We left Camp Mich[igan] the fourteenth of March to sail to Fortress Monroe. There has been boats running ever since from Washington to this place, from 12 to 15 a day. The number of men I don’t know; there must be over sixty thousand here now. There is six Mich[igan] regiments here. The 1[st], the 2[nd], the 3[rd] 4[th] 5[th and] 6[th besides Stockton’s Independent reg[iment]. They expect a heavy battle at Norfolk. That is over 12 or 15 miles from here. . . . The city of Hampton where we are encamped now the rebels evacuated last spring and burnt the city. . . . It lays at the head of Chesapeake bay and at the mouth of [the] James River. When we take up the line of march the whole army will march. It is the opinion the rebellion will soon be crushed. I know that if we had lost as many victories as they have that we would feel very uneasy. The men are all in good spirits. We lost a man since we came here. He is the first man that died out of our comp[any] since we came to Washington. He has [had] been delicate ever since he came here. He felt better coming on the boat than he had since he [had] been here. On the 20[th] he was taken sick and died the 23[rd] yesterday. He was buried in military style. I am well at present. We have not had any pay for three months. We don’t expect [any] till the next paid day. If I should die or be killed it would be worth your while to look after my pay. There would be between three or four month’s pay at the rate of 13 dollars per month besides the bounty money [of] one hundred dollars. Our colonel commanding [is] S. G. Champlin, a resident of Grand Rapids, the captain of our company name is R. Jeffords. I received a letter from Uncle Joseph yesterday. I have had two letters from home before this one that I have not answered, one from Jacob [his younger brother?] and one from you.

He was present for duty from January of 1862 through June, was wounded on August 29, 1862, at the battle of Second Bull Run, and was subsequently hospitalized. As of October 6 he was reported to have been recently discharged from Presbyterian Church hospital in Georgetown, and he returned to the Regiment on October 19; he may in fact have been absent on a furlough in November In any case, William was present for duty by December 23, 1863, when he reenlisted as a Corporal at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Brockaway, St. Clair County. (He actually signed the reenlistment papers on December 15 and was mustered on December 24.)

William was absent from December 30 on veterans’ furlough and present for duty from January of 1864 (presumably following his return from furlough) through April. He was transferred as a Corporal (some sources list Sergeant but this cannot be verified) to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He wounded slightly on June 15, 16 or 18, 1864, probably during an attempt to storm the defenses around Petersburg, Virginia. William was subsequently hospitalized on June 27 at Grant hospital, probably in New England, and eventually rejoined the Fifth Michigan.

On October 12, 1864, from the trenches in front of Petersburg, Virginia, William wrote to his parents urging his father to be a staunch supporter of Lincoln in the upcoming presidential election.

I sit myself down to write you a few lines with pleasure. I am well and I hope these few lines find you the same. Father I wrote a letter the 27th I think and sent ten dollars in it. I will send some more for you to keep for me when I hear from that we have pretty good times here now. We have a good deal of picketing to do and some fatigue duty but that is better than fighting. We like better anyhow. There has been very heavy fighting on our right and left all quiet in front of Petersburg. Well father, I hope you are a Lincoln man . . . the soldiers want you all to be Lincoln men. I hope you all will and there is no doubt but this rebellion will be put down. The rebels is lost and there is no it if they can’t get a peace president they are gone up. Their only hope is in McClellan being our next president but we can’t see the point to elect him. We must reelect old Abe and everything will go on all right and the rebellion put down and the union restored as it should be. Curse the man that says the rebels can’t be whipped for they can and will be and that before six months I hope. I am sorry that John Erels and John Brown is drafted. I don’t like to see them leave their families.

William was wounded again and taken prisoner on October 27, 1864, while the Regiment was engaged at the Boydton Plank road near Petersburg, Virginia, and was confined in Libby prison, Richmond on October 28. From Richmond he was sent to Salisbury, North Carolina and paroled at N.E. Ferry, North Carolina, on March 1 or 2, 1865. He reported to Camp Parole at College Green Barracks, Maryland on March 13, and was sent to Camp Chase, Ohio on March 14. According to the war Department William was mustered out with the Fifth Michigan on July 5, 1865, near Jeffersonville, Indiana.

Apparently William returned to Michigan soon after his arrival at Camp Chase, probably arriving at the family home around March 16.

William died of dropsy on May 23, 1865, at his parent’s farm near Brockway center, St. Clair County, and was buried in McFadden cemetery, Brockway Township.

His father died in Brockway, St. Clair County, in 1871 and in 1885 William’s mother Elizabeth applied for and received a dependent mother’s pension (no. 237930), drawing $12.00 per month by 1902.

Hugh Boyd Jr.

Hugh Boyd Jr. was born February 23, 1840, in St. Andrews, New Brunswick, Canada, the son of Hugh Sr. (b. 1808) Ellen (b. 1810).

Hugh’s parents were probably married in Ireland. In any case sometime before 1840 they left Ireland and immigrated to America. By 1840 Hugh Sr. may have been living in Vermont. Hugh Sr. eventually took his family to Michigan and by 1850 they were living in the vicinity of Muskegon, near Lake Michigan, where Hugh Sr. worked as a laborer and Hugh Jr. attended school along with his siblings. By 1860 Hugh Jr. was working as a day laborer, probably with his brothers John and Alexander, and living with his mother in Muskegon, Muskegon County.

Hugh stood 5’6” with blue eyes, sandy hair and a light complexion and was 21 years old and probably still living in Muskegon when he joined the Muskegon Rangers in April as Third Corporal. The “Rangers” were a local militia company formed in Muskegon soon after the fall of Fort Sumter in April of 1861, and were reorganized into Company H of the Third Michigan infantry then forming at Cantonment Anderson in Grand Rapids. Hugh consequently enlisted as Third Corporal of Company H on May 13, 1861. He was reported as a deserter on November 26, 1861, along with George A. and George W. Bennett, also of Company H. Like the Bennetts, Hugh eventually returned to the regiment under the President’s proclamation of amnesty on April 7, 1863, at Camp Sickles, Maryland. He was mustered out on June 20, 1864, at Detroit.

After his discharge from the army Hugh returned to Muskegon and worked for many years as an engineer. On October 28, 1865, he married Victoria Campau (1844-1873) at the Congregational Church in Grand Haven, Ottawa County. (She was probably the sister of Adolph Campau who had served in Company B.) Victoria died in childbirth on February 28 or March 1, 1873; the child, a son Hugh, died three months later.

Hugh was admitted as a single man to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home on September 7, 1889 (no. 1085), and discharged at his own request on July 7, 1890.

Hugh was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association and in 1889 he applied for and received pension (no. 509,617), drawing $50 per month by 1922.

Hugh was admitted to the Northwestern Branch National Military Home in Milwaukee, Wisconsin: the first time on January 17, 1891, some six months after his discharge from the Michigan Home, and then discharged on August 2, 1899, or just 12 days before his readmission to the Michigan Home on August 14, 1899. He was again discharged at his request on June 12, 1900. It is possible that one of Hugh’s brothers was residing in Wisconsin and that Hugh had gone to stay with him. It is also possible that Hugh found the National Military Home more attractive than the state-run Michigan Soldiers’ Home.

In any event, Hugh apparently returned to Wisconsin following his discharge from the Michigan Home in 1900 since he was reported to be living at 745 47th Avenue in West Allis, Wisconsin from around 1900 to 1904, and by 1911 he was supposedly living in the Milwaukee National Home. In 1920 he was boarding with the Virginia Roepke family in Milwaukee.

In fact, it is quite likely that he remained in Wisconsin until he died a widower of apoplexy and myocarditis at the Milwaukee National Home on June 11, 1922. He was buried in Wood National Cemetery, Milwaukee: section 24, grave no. 3.

John Edwin Aldeson

John Edwin Aldeson also known as “Alderson,” was born on January 5, 1845, in London, Ontario, Canada or in New York.

At some point before 1864 John left his home in Canada and immigrated to the United States, eventually settling in western Michigan.

John stood 5’7” tall, with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was a 19-year-old farmer living in Berlin (Saranac), Ionia County, Michigan when he enlisted in Company D on January 29, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years. (Company D was composed in large part of men who came from western Ionia County and Eaton County.) John joined the regiment on April 28, 1864, at Brandy Station, Virginia, and was reportedly wounded soon afterwards. In later years John claimed that he had been hit by a rifle buttstock in his left side during an assault on enemy lines at Spotsylvania, Virginia on May 12, 1864. In any case, he remained with the regiment and was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan Infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war John returned to Michigan and was living in Ingham County when he married Emma Cole on December 27, 1875; they had at least three children: Katie (b. 1878), William and Leroy.

In 1883 he applied for and received pension no. 1,005,251, drawing $16.00 per month.

By 1880 John (listed as “Edwin J.”) was living with his wife and daughter Katie in Lansing, Ingham County, next door to the Cole family, probably Emma’s parents. Indeed, John probably resided in Lansing most of his life: he was living at 623 Lewis Street in 1890 and also when he was admitted to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 2556) in Grand Rapids on December 3, 1895. Upon admission to the Home he listed his occupation as sailor, and he may have been either divorced or a widower when he entered the Home, since he listed himself as a single man when he was first admitted to the Home.

In any case, John was discharged the first time on January 3, 1896, and readmitted on April 4, and discharged on June 8. He was readmitted on January 8, 1900, discharged April 15, readmitted on July 27, and discharged on September 10, 1900; admitted on July 14, 1905, discharged on October 12, admitted on August 4, 1906, and discharged on November 26, 1907; admitted on March 30, 1908, and discharged on October 4, 1910.

By 1908 John was back living in Lansing, Michigan at 623 Lewis Street, and was under the care of Mrs. Barbara Schelhammer. He remained in Lansing until his final admission to the Home on December 16, 1910.

John died of organic heart disease on March 22, 1913, at 2:00 p.m. at the Home, and was buried in the Home cemetery: section 5, row 15, grave 11.