Dayton NaCem

Albert Wustrow

Albert Wustrow was born in 1829 in Berlin, Germany.

Albert immigrated to America and settled in western Michigan sometime before war broke out.

He stood 5’8” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was a 32-year-old tinsmith probably living in Grand Rapids, Kent County when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861, crediting Grand Rapids. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.)

He reenlisted as Corporal on December 24, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Grand Rapids’ Fifth Ward, but listing his residence as Muskegon, nd was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864 and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February.

He was transferred as a Corporal to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864 and was reported absent sick in July. He was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After his discharge from the army Albert eventually returned to western Michigan. He was possibly the same “Albert Wustrow” who, in September of 1869, was beaten and robbed in Grand Rapids.

At a late hour on Sunday night last [wrote the Democrat on September 21] Albert Wustrow, a good and peaceable citizen, was attacked and brutally beaten by a couple of ‘roughs’ when in front of Mr. Kappenberger’s restaurant, where he boarded on Canal Street. He was struck by one of the villains a severe blow with iron knuckles, which cut a deep gash about two inches in length, from one of his eyes down his cheek. He bled frightfully, and was thought by Drs. DeCamp and Bienneman to be in a very dangerous condition yesterday morning. His symptoms were better last evening. After committing the crime, the men fled as rapidly as possible but the alarm being given they were followed, and one of them arrested and lodged in jail that night, and the other man was arrested yesterday morning and placed in the ‘lock up’. Officer Henry DeVries assisted by Officer Frank Heriman, Jacob DeVries and Mr. Bradley of the Bronson House are entitled to much credit for having followed the chaps until they were secured. The names of the men who have been arrested are given as John Coats and John Donnelly. They were taken before Justice Sinclair yesterday on the charge of drunk and disorderly, and on examination being found guilty, they were committed to the County jail in default of the payment of $9.25 each, fine and costs. We understand that an information has also been filed against the respondents, Coats and Donnelly, for assault with intent to kill.

Albert was living in Grand Rapids in 1874 and was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association. He listed his residence as Grand Rapids and occupation as tinker when he entered the Central Branch National Military Home at Dayton, Ohio, on January 20, 1877. He was still living in the Home in 1880.

Albert died, probably at the Home in Dayton, on either November 12, 1881 or December 12, 1882, and was buried in the Home cemetery in Dayton: section C row 7, grave 13.

Elijah Warner

Elijah Warner was born in 1840 in New York.

Elijah left New York and had settled in western Michigan by the time war had broken out.

He stood 6’1” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was a 21-year-old teamster possibly living in Kent County when he enlisted in Company F on May 13, 1861. He was reported working in the Brigade bakery in May of 1863, and “absent in the hands of civil authorities” in August, apparently under arrest, possibly in New York City.

Third Corps, at 10:25 a.m. on August 7, charged with “misbehavior before the enemy.” Specifically, it was alleged by Captain Thomas Tate of the Third Michgian “that he . . . did while his Regiment was supporting a battery on the 3rd day of May 1863 [at Chancellorsville, Virginia] in the face of the enemy, disgracefully run away and remained absent until the evening of May 4th 1863.” Elijah pled not guilty.

The prosecution then called Sergeant James Van Dusen of Company F.

Judge Advocate: State what you know in reference to his running away from his regiment at the time specified.

Answer: We were laying in line of battle b y Brigade, supporting batteries. I saw the accused when we halted to lay down. I did not see him after we did lay down. We were ordered to make a charge and when we made the charge I am confident he was not there. The next time I saw him was about the middle of the next day. When he returned and reported to his regiment.

Judge Advocate: Is he a regularly enlisted and mustered man?

Answer: Yes sir.

Judge Advocate: Was your regiment engaged with the enemy during his absence?

Answer: Not after that charge.

Judge Advocate: Were you engaged with the enemy while the accused was with his company?

Answer: I do not think we were. . . .

Judge Advocate: How did he behave in the charge of Saturday night?

Answer: He behaved well as far as I know.

Court: Was the regiment in the same place when he returned as it was when he left?

Answer: No sir.

Court: Was the regiment under fire when he returned?

Answer: No, all was quiet at the time he returned.

Judge Advocate: Was the regiment under fire of artillery during the time he was absent?

Answer: yes sir, it was under heavy artillery fire.

Court: Have you ever known him to misbehave himself before the enemy?

Answer: No sir I have not.

Prisoner: What was my conduct before the enemy at Gettysburg and Wapping Heights?

Answer: It was very good, he behaved himself very well.

Court: Do you know whether the accused disgracefully ran away at the time specified.

Answer: I do not.

The witness was dismissed and Sergeant Harvey Briggs of Company F was then called by the prosecution.

Judge Advocate: Do you know, of your own knowledge, that the accused ran away from his Regiment when supporting a battery on the 3rd of May?

Answer: I know that he did run away.

Judge Advocate: state what you know in reference to his running away.

Answer: I know that he asked the Captain’s permission to leave the ranks to get some water. I do not think the Captain gave him permission, for I heard the Captain say that he could not let any man leave the ranks, but that some of the men would give him some water. In about ten minutes from that time I saw him get up and leave the Company, and was going back towards the rear. I spoke to him and told him not to leave the ranks but he made no reply. I think he must have heard me, for he was rising up and picking his gun up at the time I spoke. The next time I saw him was in the afternoon of the next day.

Judge Advocate: Have you seen the accused receive pay of the U.S. Goverment?

Answer: Yes I have.

Court: Was the Regiment under a heavey fire at the time the accused left the ranks?

Answer: Yes. We were under a heavy artillery fire.

Prisoner: What has been my conduct in battle at Gettysburg and Wapping Heights?

Answer: His conduct was noticed as being remarkably good at both engagements. I noticed it myself, he behaved well.

The witness was dismissed and Captain Thomas Tate commanding Company F was then called as a witness for the defense.

Prisoner: What has been my conduct at the battle of Gettsburg, Wapping Heights and since?

Answer: His conduct since the battle of Chancellorsville and in both the engagements named has been unexceptionable.

The witness was then dismissed. Elijah then submitted the following statement to the Court:

I had [had] no water since the afternoon of the day before. The men in the company had so little that they could not spare me any. When we halted and lay down, I asked the Captain to let me get some, and he replied he would pretty soon, or some such answer. We lay there some 15 minutes, and I was suffering for a drink of water, and supposing I should have time to get some from a creek not more than a half dozen rods, I went to get some, and the Regiment was gone when I returned. I was not gone more than 10 or 15 minutes. I looked for them, and could not find them, but later in the forenoon I found a squad of the Regiment (which I joined) with the Adjutant. And remained with them till we went to the river and stacked arms. (The Adjutant is now in Michigan.) I then went to the creek close by, washed my feet and stockings, and I looked nearly all night for my Regiment, and in the forenoon of the next day found it, and joined my company.

Elijah was found guilty to both the charge and specification and sentenced to forfeit two month’s pay and to do fatigue duty with a log and chain. However, on August 8 Major General David Birney, commanding the First division, ordered that “The accused having shown that since the alleged & proven misbehavior that he has endeavored to regain his character as a good soldier by gallantry at Gettysburg, the sentence is remitted and the accused be returned to duty.”

He was reported a deserter on September 19 in New York City, and returned to the Regiment on October 11, 1863.

Elijah reenlisted on December 24, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Bowne, Kent County, was presumably absent on 30 days’ veteran’s furlough in January of 1864 but apparently failed to return to the Regiment and was reported AWOL in February. He soon rejoined the Regiment and was transferred to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

Elijah may have returned to Michigan (or he may have been living in Dayton, Ohio) when he was admitted to the Central Branch National Military Home in Dayton, Ohio, on September 13, 1871.

No pension seems to be available.

Elijah died on November 22, 1871, at the Home in Dayton, and was buried in Dayton National Cemetery: section A, row 11, grave 41.

Peter Wagner

Peter Wagner was born in 1844 in Nassau, Germany, the son of Christian (b. 1814) and Margarethe (b. 1824).

Prussian-born Christian and Margarethe were married in Germany and left Europe and immigrated to the United States sometime between 1844 and 1859 when they were living in Michigan. Peter’s family eventually settled in Detroit, Wayne County and by 1860 they were both living in Detroit, Seventh Ward. That same year there was one “Peter Wagoner,” age 17, a farm laborer living with and/or working for for the Slick family in Alpine, Kent County, on the western side of the state.

In any case, Peter was 17 years old and residing in Allegan County when he enlisted in Company C on May 15, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.) He was discharged for disability (cause unknown, but quite possibly consumption) on October 21, 1861.

Peter’s sister Margaretta would marry Andrew Kirschman, another member of Company C, in 1864.

Peter returned to Michigan and was probably living in Byron, Kent County when he reentered the service on December 30, 1861, as a private, for three years, in Company F, Fourteenth Michigan infantry and was mustered in on January 7, 1862.

He was mustered out of the service with the regiment on July 18, 1865 in Louisville, Kentucky.

After the regiment was disbanded in Detroit on July 29 Peter probably returned to his home in western Michigan. (There was one Peter Wagner, age 29, who enlisted in Company I, reorganized Third Michigan infantry, on February 20, 1865, at Grand Rapids, for one year, and was mustered the same day. He was discharged at the expiration of his term of service on February 16, 1866, at San Antonio, Texas.)

In 1878 he applied for a pension (no. 248277), but the certificate was never granted.

Peter may have been living in Detroit in 1880 (there was a 36-year-old Prussian-born baker named Peter Wagner living with his brother John B. Wagner in Detroit in 1880). He was probably living in Georgetown, Ottawa County when he was admitted to the Central Branch National Military Home in Dayton, Ohio, sometime before late 1883. (The Michigan Soldiers’ Home was not opened in Grand Rapids until 1885.)

He may very likely have been suffering from consumption and in fact he died from phythisis pulmonaria (consumption) at Dayton on December 25, 1883. Peter was buried that same day in Dayton National Cemetery: section D, row 14, grave 21. His father was living in Grand Rapids when Peter died.

William R. Stall

William R. Stall was born in 1843 in Wayne County, New York, possibly the son of John W. (1801-1890) and Hannah (b. 1799).

William’s parents were both born in New York and presumably married there. By 1850 William was attending school with his younger brother Myron and living with his family in Sodus, Wayne County, New York, where his father worked as a common laborer. William left New York and eventually settled in Michigan. He may have been living in Cooper, Kalamazoo County or Courtland, Kent County, in 1860.

In any case, he stood 5’5” with blue eyes, auburn hair and a light complexion and was probably living in Lansing in the early Spring of 1861 when he became a member of the Lansing company called the “Williams’ Rifles,” whose members would serve as the nucleus of Company G. He was 18 years old and probably living in Lansing or Ingham County when he enlisted in Company G on May 10, 1861. By June of 1862 he was reported sick in the Regimental hospital.

William eventually recovered, and returned to duty. He reenlisted on December 24, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Lansing First Ward, was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864 and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February. He was reported at Division headquarters from February of 1864 through April, on detached service in May, and still on detached service at headquarters when he was transferred as a Sergeant to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He remained on detached service at headquarters through October, was absent with leave in February of 1865, and mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

William eventually returned to Michigan after the war.

He married New York native Susan or Susannah B. (b 1842), and they had at least five children: George W. (b. 1867), Fred J. (b. 1869, Nelson (b. 1869), Wilson (b. 1870) and Irwin (b. 1879).

By 1870 he was working in a saw mill in Hubbardton, Lebanon Township, Clinton County. (His brother Myron may have lived briefly in Cheboygan, Michigan, in about 1870 before moving on to Iowa.) By 1880 William was working as a farmer and living with his wife and children in Wheatfield, Ingham County; two houses away lived the family of Myron Pollock, who may have been related to William Pollock who had also served from Wheatfield in Company G of the Old Third during the war.

By 1886 William was living in Waukon, Iowa, in 1888 in Carlisle, Arkansas (when he testified in the pension application of John Cutler) and in Vernon, Texas in 1890. He eventually settled in Newport News, Virginia, where he was living when he was admitted to the Central Branch, National Military Home in Dayton, Ohio. His wife also moved to Dayton and by 1906 was living on Gettysburg Avenue in Dayton.

In 1885 he applied for and received a pension (no. 414875).

William died of cancer of the stomach on September 1, 1906, and was buried in the Dayton National Cemetery: section P, row 23, grave no. 40.

Shortly after William died Susannah applied for and received a widow’s pension (no. 627444).

Alfred Henry Slocum update 10/18/2016

Alfred Henry Slocum was born on July 15, 1842, in Middlebury, Shiawassee County, Michigan, the son of New York natives John (b. 1821) and Lydia Bugbee (b. 1817).

John was living in Middlebury, Shiawassee County in 1840 and married Lydia Bugbee in Shiawassee County in 1841.By 1850 Alfred was attending school and living with his family and younger brother Addison in Thornapple, Barry County. By 1860 Alfred was still living with his family – his father was working as Justice of the Peace – in Thornapple.

Alfred stood 5’11” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was a 19-year-old blacksmith probably living in Barry County when he enlisted in Company K on January 17, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered the same day. He eventually joined the regiment in Virginia. In February of 1862 Alfred contracted dysentery while in winter quarters at Camp Michigan, Virginia. On March 21, 1862, he was admitted to the “Mansion House” General Hospital in Alexandria, Virginia, suffering from acute dysentery and general debility. He was discharged on June 20, 1862, at the general hospital in Alexandria, Virginia for “general debility resulting from an acute attack of scorbutus.”

Alfred returned to Barry County and resumed (or began) his trade of blacksmithing. (His father John was living in Irving, Barry County in 1870.)

By the fall of 1882 Alfred was a resident of the National Military Home (central branch) in Dayton, Montgomery County, Ohio, when he applied for pension no. 462,571. According to the Home medical authorities, Alfred was suffering from an anal fistula. “Both buttocks,” it was reported in November, “are now . . . hardened and inflamed around the anus. There are four fistulous openings that are discharging very freely, and produce much pain for which he has been taking opiates. These have checked his diarrhea. . . . He is in a deplorable condition from his fistulae in anus. It has undermined his general health. He is feeble and emaciated and confined to bed most of the time.”

Alfred died on March 12, 1883, in Dayton, presumably of chronic dysentery. He was buried in the Home cemetery, section D, row 9, grave 11.

William Edward Richter

William Edward Richter was born in 1826 in Weimar, Germany.

William immigrated to America and settled in western Michigan sometime before the war broke out.

William stood 5’9” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion, and was a 35-year-old workman possibly living in Kent County when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.) He was discharged for consumption on July 31, 1861, at Arlington Heights, Virginia

William returned to Michigan where he reentered the service (probably on October 10, 1861 and probably in Grand Rapids) in B Battery, First Michigan Light Artillery, listing his residence as Mt. Clemons, Macomb County. He was most likely mustered in Grand Rapids where the battery was originally organized between September 10 and December 14, 1861. The battery left Michigan on December 17 for St. Louis, Missouri, and during the battle of Shiloh in early April was overwhelmed and captured except for Lang’s section, which was attached to Mann’s Battery “C,” First Missouri Artillery. It was subsequently reorganized at Detroit in December of 1862. The battery left for Columbus, Kentucky on Christmas day, and remained in Columbus until it was moved to Corinth, Mississippi January 4-9, 1863. It remained in Corinth until early March when it was moved to Bethel, Tennessee and remained on duty there until early June. Edward was discharged for disability as a Corporal on June 21, 1863, at Detroit.

According to the burial records at the Dayton National Cemetery, William reentered the service in October of 1861 in the “Second Wisconsin Battery” and was discharged in March of 1863.

In December of 1863 (?) he applied for and received a pension (no. 110122).

At some point after his discharge William apparently returned to Michigan. By 1870 he was probably working as a sailor and living with the Louis Liscke family in Detroit’s Third Ward. He may have been living in Detroit in the fall of 1872 when he was admitted to the “Michigan Soldiers’ Home” at Harper hospital in Detroit, awaiting transportation to the Central Branch National Military Home in Dayton, Ohio. In fact he was admitted to Dayton on November 14, 1872.

William died of asthma on December 7, 1872, at Dayton, and was buried in Dayton National Cemetery: section A, row 11, grave no. 61.

Samuel Aldrich

Samuel Aldrich was born in 1820 or 1826 in Uxbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

He reportedly served in the Mexican war, and if so it was quite likely while he was still residing in Massachusetts.

Samuel married his first wife, Irish-born Eliza Sherwood (b. 1816) in 1852, and they eventually settled in Michigan. By 1860 Samuel was working as a shingle-maker and living with Eliza (who was working as a tailoress) in Norton, Muskegon County.

He stood between 6’5” and 6’7” tall, with blue eyes, gray hair and a fair complexion, and was probably 40 years old and living and working as a sawyer and shingle maker in Norton when he enlisted on April 29, 1861, as Sixth Corporal in F company, crediting Spring Lake, Ottawa County. (Curiously Samuel did not join either the Muskegon-based Company H or the Ottawa County-based Company I.)

Samuel was present for duty through February of 1862, and then absent sick in his quarters in March and April and also in May and June.

Apparently, on May 5, 1862, while “on the march from Yorktown to Williamsburg,” Virginia, Samuel was carrying “the Regimental colors and marching much of the way very rapidly on the double quick when near Williamsburg, being a large and very tall man, he could not endure the excessive fatigue became exhausted and Major Byron R. Pierce, commanding the Regiment, finding that” Samuel “could not keep up with his Regiment told him to fall out and give the colors to another which he did. About two days after this,” about May 8, “varicose veins made their appearance around, above and below his left ankle, also upon his left leg nearly to his hip.”

He was listed as absent sick in a general hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, from August 18 through the end of the year. And indeed, he was subsequently hospitalized at Patterson Park hospital in Baltimore during all or part of the months of August and September. In August of 1862, he was reported sick in the hospital, and was dropped from the company rolls on December 30, 1862 at Camp Pitcher, Virginia.

From Patterson Park he was transferred to West’s Building hospital in Baltimore, where he remained about three months. He was then sent to the Convalescent Camp, in Alexandria, Virginia where he remained until he was discharged on February 16, 1863, for varicose veins of both legs, although he claimed in later years that he had been shot with a poisoned bullet, which produced the varicose veins.

After he was discharged from the army, Samuel returned to Michigan and was probably living in Lenawee County when he married his second wife, Anna Odell (b. 1818) on November 23, 1863, in Ionia County. (It is unknown what became of Eliza.)

Samuel subsequently enlisted in the Second Veterans’ Reserve Corps on December 19, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Grand Rapids’ First Ward. (The VRC was made up of men who while ambulatory were generally incapable of performing regular military tasks due to having suffered debilitating wounds and/or diseases and were assigned to garrison the many supply depots, draft rendezvous, camps, forts, prisons, etc. scattered throughout the northern cities, thus freeing able-bodied men for regular military duty.) Samuel may have been assigned to the rendezvous camp in Jackson, Jackson County. In any case, he allegedly deserted from Company B, Second Regiment, VRC on either April 6 or July 6, 1865.

After the war Samuel lived in Grand Rapids where he woked as a laborer and at one time resided at 36 Waterloo Street. He was probably still living in Grand Rapids when he was admitted to the Central Branch, National Military Home, in Dayton, Ohio on April 1, 1867, and was eventually discharged from the NMH. He again returned to Michigan and was living on Ottawa Street, in Grand Rapids in 1870 when he applied for a pension (no. 113,746, drawing $6.00 per month in 1887). He claimed he was suffering from the effects of varicose veins dating back to May of 1862.

Samuel was working as a laborer and living in Montague, Muskegon County, Michigan when he married his third wife, the widow Sarah Griffin Sargent (d. 1903), on December 3, 20 or 30, 1872, in Oceana County, Michigan. (Sarah was the widow of Fernando Sargeant or Sergeant, who had served in the reorganized Third Michigan infantry.)

It seems that Samuel had neglected to divorce Anna, however, and had apparently abandoned her. In 1875 Sarah reportedly “filed a bill of complaint” against Samuel claiming that when they were married he had another wife, thus nullifying their marriage. She was also seeking divorce from Samuel on the grounds of cruelty. It is not known whether the divorce was granted or not.

Samuel was a member of Grand Army of the Republic Henry Post No. 3 in Montague, Muskegon County, and of Champlin Post No. 29 in Grand Rapids.

In 1880 Samuel was a resident of the NMH in Dayton, listing himself as married and his occupation as lumberman, and he was still in the National Home in Dayton in 1883.

In any case, Samuel was reportedly residing in Grand Rapids when he returned to the National Home in Dayton, Ohio where he died of pneumonia on January 22, 1888. (It is curious that he did not choose to go to the new Michigan Soldiers' Home in Grand Rapids.) He was buried in the Dayton National Cemetery in section G, row 8, grave 12.

In 1897 Sarah was living in Licking, Texas County, Missouri, but by 1901 she had returned to Michigan and was living in Muskegon; she applied for a pension (no. 658553) but the certificate was never granted. In fact it appears that she reapplied for a pension based on the service of her first husband, Fernando Sargent.