England

William Wright

William Wright was born on March 14, 1839, in Suffolk, England, probably the son of John (1813-1876) and Sarah (Barnaby, 1812-1898).

In 1853 William’s parents left England and immigrated to the United States, landing in New York city. They moved west and first settled in Ohio, locating in Lorain County where they remained for about 3 years. In 1856 the family moved to Michigan, settling in Gratiot County, and cleared some 40 acres of land in North Shade Township. The family subsequently added another 240 acres, selling off 128 acres. In 1860 there was a 20-year-old laborer named William Wright, born in England, working for the Briggs family in Pine River, Gratiot County. According to Patricia Hamp, who has researched the Civil War veterans from Gratiot County, he is listed as being from Gratiot County at the time of his enlistment.

William stood 5’4” with gray eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was 20 years old and possibly still living in Gratiot or in Ionia County when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861 -- he was possibly related to John Wright and/or Matthew Wright. (Company D was composed in large part of men who came from western Ionia County and Eaton County.) George Miller of Company A and a tentmate in the winter of 1861-62, said of Wright that he was “nicknamed ‘lightning’ by the boys from his long slim appearance and awkward motions.”

William was shot in the left leg on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, and hospitalized in the general hospital at Fortress Monroe, Virginia. By mid-September he was in Fairfax Seminary Hospital in Alexandria reported to be “doing well” and he was in a hospital in Washington, DC, as of late October and reported still hospitalized in Washington at the end of December. . Indeed, he remained hospitalized until he was discharged on January 14, 1863, at Camp Banks, Virginia, for “loss of power of left leg from gunshot wound in inguinal region.”

After his discharge from the army, William returned to Michigan. He listed Hubbardston, Ionia County as his mailing address on his discharge paper, but was livingin North Shade, Gratiot County in April of 1863 when he applied for a pension. By 1870 he was back living with his parents on their farm in North Shade.

In 1871 he was married to Michigan native Libbie C. (1847-1893) and they had at least three children: Edd J. (b. 1872), Ora L. (b. 1874 and Ray (d. 1878).

He eventually settled in Maple Rapids, Clinton County where he was living by 1883 when he was drawing $6.00 per month for a wounded left ilium (pension no 22,408, dated January of 1864). And indeed, he lived in Maple Rapids for many years, and probably for most of the rest of his life. He was living in Maple Rapids in June of 1906 when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association.

William was a member of the Masonic order, Lodge no. 145, in Maple Rapids, of the Order of Workmen and of the GAR. He was also a Republican.

By 1880 William was working as a farmer and living with his wife and children in North Shade, Gratiot County. He was possibly living in Gratiot County when he married his second wife, Michigan native Salinda Jones Cressinger (b. 1844), on March 12, 1895, in Maple Rapids. He was living in North Shade, Gratiot County in 1894.

William was probably living in or near Maple Rapids, when he died of cancer of the stomach on January 26, 1910, and was buried in Payne cemetery, just across the County line in Gratiot County.

In 1910 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 819763). She was drawing $90 per month in 1920 when she died in Maple Rapids.

Matthew Wright - updated 8/30/2016

Matthew Wright was born in 1836 in Lancashire, England, the son of Thomas and Fanny (Jarvis).

By 1860 Matthew was a farm laborer living with and/or working for Silas Hedges in Tallmadge, Ottawa County (Charles Randall who would also enlist in Company I worked for Jeremiah Hedges)

Matthew stood 5’4” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was 25 years old and still living in Tallmadge when he enlisted in Company I on May 13, 1861 (and was possibly related to John Wright and/or William Wright), and was reported missing in action on July 1, 1862, presumably at White Oak, Swamp, Virginia. He was soon afterwards returned to the regiment and allegedly deserted on August 28 or 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run. It is not known whatever became of this charge, although he was present for duty when he was wounded on May 3, 1863, at Chancellorsville, Virginia.

Matthew reenlisted on December 24, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Algoma, Kent County, was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough, perhaps in Michigan, in January of 1864 and probably returned to the regiment on or about the first of February. He was transferred to Company I, 5th Michigan Infantry upon consolidation of the 3rd and 5th Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was taken prisoner on October 27, 1864, probably at Boydton Plank road, near Petersburg, Virginia. There is no mention of his being paroled although curiously he was reported AWOL in March of 1865, then as absent sick in April, and mustered out with the regiment on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

It is not known if Matthew ever returned to Michigan. He was living in Wisconsin in 1888 when he applied for and received a pension (no. 536123). He was probably still living in Wisconsin when he married New York native Mrs. Lois L. Rogers Haskins on February 14, 1896, in Monroe or Wonewoc, Juneau County, Wisconsin.

Matthew died of heart disease on February 6, 1899, possibly in Wisconsin.

In 1900 his widow Lois was residing in Juneau County, Wisconsin, when she applied for a pension (no. 741808), but the certificate was never granted.

Charles Wilkinson

Charles Wilkinson was born in 1822 in England.

Charles left England and came to the United States. He married English-born Isabell (b. 1829), possibly in England; in any case they had at least one child, a daughter Charlotte (b. 1850).

By 1850 he had settled his family on a farm in Crockery, Ottawa County, Michigan. By 1860 Charles was farming and living with his wife in Coopersville, Polkton Township, Ottawa County. Their daughter Charlotte is not listed as living with them but one Henry Hudson (b. 1857 in Michigan) is listed with the family.

He was a 40-year-old farmer, probably living in Coopersville or Polkton, Ottawa County when he enlisted in Company I on August 12, 1862, at Grand Rapids, crediting Polkton, Ottawa County. (Company I was made up largely of men from Ottawa County, particularly from the eastern side of the County.) Charles joined the Regiment on September 8 at Upton’s Hill, Virginia. He was missing in action May 2, 1863, at Chancellorsville, Virginia, and returned to the Regiment on October 3 when he was reported as driving an ambulance -- interestingly in November he was also reported as an exchanged prisoner-of-war at Camp Convalescent near Alexandria, Virginia. It appears he may have been taken prisoner on May 2 and exchanged on or about November 15.

In any case, he was absent sick from December of 1863 until he was transferred to Company C, Twenty-second Veterans’ Reserve Corps January 15, 1864, at Washington, DC. (The VRC was made up of men who while ambulatory were generally incapable of performing regular military tasks due to having suffered debilitating wounds and/or diseases and were assigned to garrison the many supply depots, draft rendezvous, camps, forts, prisons, etc. scattered throughout the northern sities, thus freeing able-bodied men for regular military duty.) It appears that Charles died shortly after being transferred to the VRC.

In December (?) of 1864 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 48207). (In 1870 one Henry Hudson, age 13 and born in Michigan was a farm laborer living with and/or working for the Collins Barnes family in Polkton.)

John J. Stribbling

John J. Stribbling was born on March 15, 1842 in England, probably the son of William (1818-1899) and Mary Ann (b. 1818).

Sometime between 1841 and 1849 William and his family immigrated to the United States and by 1850 John was living with his family in Royalton, Niagara County, New York, where his father was working as a laborer. The family eventually settled in Michigan. Widower or divorced, William apparently remarried to one Alvira (1816-1898).

John stood 5’10” with blue eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion and was a 19-year-old farmer possibly living in Delta, Eaton County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company G on August 27, 1862, at Detroit or Lansing for 3 years, crediting Delta, and was mustered the same day at Detroit. He joined the Regiment on September 8 at Upton's Hill, Virginia, and was wounded slightly on July 2 or 3, 1863, at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. He was transferred to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was discharged “by order” on either May 31 or June 2, 1865, near Washington, DC.

John returned to Michigan, probably to Delta, after his discharge from the army.

He married to New York native Adell (b. 1847) and they had at least two children: George (b. 1868), Eugene (b. 1870) and an unnamed infant which died the day it was born in 1871.

By 1870 John was working as a farmer (he owned some $2000 worth of real estate) and was living with his wife and two children in Delta, Delta Township, Eaton County. John’s parents lived near by with the family of Joseph Woolf.

John was struck by lightning and killed in Delta, Eaton County, on July 15, 1872, and was buried in Delta center cemetery.

His widow was living in Delta in 1890. She eventually remarried a Mr. Randolph. In 1917 Adella applied for and received a widow’s pension (no. 871175).

Edward Stevens - updated 2/23/2017

Edward Stevens was born November 26, 1847, in Chipstead, Surrey, England, the son of James Stevens (1820-1902) and Caroline Smith (b. 1824).

James and Caroline were married on April 21, 1844, in Hampton Wick, Middlesex, England. Edward emigrated to the United States, probably with Richard Stapleton and Margaret Stevens, and numerous older siblings, arriving in New York City aboard the ship America on January 18, 1854. Edward eventually made his way west, settling in Barry County, Michigan. In 1850 there was a 43-year-old Edward Stevens living in Leroy, Calhoun County, Michigan, and one Edward Stevens living in China, St. Clair County.

Edward stood 5’2” with black eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion and was an 18-year-old farmer possibly living in Rutland, Barry County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company E on February 8, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Rutland, and was mustered the same day. He joined the Regiment on March 23, was on detached service in May, and probably still on detached service when he was transferred to Company E, 5th Michigan Infantry upon consolidation of the 3rd and 5th Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was absent sick from September through November, and mustered out presumably on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war Edward returned to Michigan, probably to Barry County.

He married Michigan native Harriet Maria Wilkins (1851-1927) on August 13, 1867, and they had at least 10 children: Robert (b. 1868), Albert (b. 1869), Mary Emma (b. 1870), George E. (1872-1945), Caroline (1874-1956), Jennie (b. 1875), Ormond S. (1878-1899), Kitty (1880-1903), Edith May (1884-1967, Mrs. Lucas), and Merle Jean (1887-1957).

By 1870 Edward was working as a farm laborer and living with his wife and son in Hope, Barry County. He eventually moved to the northern part of the state was living in Chase, Lake County in 1890 and 1894. He probably spent the rest of his life in Lake County. He was working as a blacksmith and living with his wife Harriet and daughter Merle in Chase, Lake County in 1900. By 1910 Edward was working as a farmer and living with his wife Harriet, their daughter Merle and granddaughter Merle Wyman in Chase. He and Harriet were still living in Chase in 1920. By 1930 Edward was a widower living in Chase; his daughter Edith, a cook in a clubhouse, was also living with him.

In 1887 he applied for and received a pension (no. 1112104).

Edward was a widower when he died of a heart attack on September 11, 1934, in Chase, Lake County and was buried in Chase Township Cemetery.

 Many thanks to Kirby Stevens for pointing me to Edward's listing on Familysearch.org!

Samuel A. Greenwood

Samuel A. Greenwood was born 1830 in London, England.

Samuel immigrated to America and eventually settled in Michigan.

He was married to Irish-born Mary A. (1839-1867), and they had at least two children: Susan (b. 1857) and Joseph (b. 1860).

They settled in Michigan sometime before 1857 and by 1860 Samuel was working as a farm laborer and living with his wife and two children in Greenwood (near Brockway), St. Clair County. (Neither Samuel or Mary could read or write.)

Samuel stood 5’10” with blue eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion, and was 40 or 33 years old and probably working in Sparta, Kent County when he enlisted in Company C on August 9, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered the same day. He joined the Regiment on September 10 at Camp Bullock, Virginia, was hospitalized on February 11, 1863, and reported absent sick in the hospital from June until he was transferred to Company C, Ninth Regiment, Veterans’ Reserve Corps, on either September 30, 1863, or November 11, 1863, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

After his discharge from the army Samuel eventually returned to Michigan, probably to his family in St. Clair County (Mary died in Port Huron, St. Clair County in 1867).

Samuel eventually moved to the western side of the state and was probably living in Kent County when he married his second (?) wife Lucinda or Nancy (b. 1836), on October 22, 1868 in Algoma.

He apparently had two more children: Lottie (1868-69) and Samuel (d. 1868). He was possibly living in Algoma, Kent County, in 1868 when his son Samuel died and in 1869 when his daughter died.

In any case, Samuel was living in Algoma when he married his third (?) wife Pennsylvania native Mary “Polly” Helsel (nee Misner, b. 1828 on June 8, 1870 in Algoma.

By 1870 Samuel was working as a farm laborer and living with his new wife Polly and two sons, Joseph and Richard (b. 1867), as well as three of Polly’s children by her former marriage in Algoma, Kent County. By 1880 Samuel was working as a laborer and living with his wife, and three daughters, two of Mary’s who he had apparently adopted and Eliza Ann (b. 1871, Mrs. Stevens), in Cedar Springs, Kent County

In 1879 he applied for and received a pension (no. 242,466).

Samuel was living in Solon, Kent County in 1890, and in Cedar Springs in 1894 and probably when he joined the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association in 1899.

Edward Grayson

Edward Grayson was born 1830 in Preston, Lancastershire, England.

Edward left England and immigrated to America, eventually moving to Ohio.

He stood 5’9” with gray eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion, and was 33 years old and possibly living in Ravenna, Portage County, Ohio when he became a substitute for Mahlon E. Bailey, drafted on February 17 for 9 months at Lenox, Macomb County, Michigan. Grayson then enlisted in Unassigned on March 15, 1863, at Lenox for 3 years, crediting Macomb County, and was sent to the Regiment on March 26.

There is no further record.

However, it seems that in 1860 there was one Edward Grayson, born 1830 in England, living in Chicago’s Eighth Ward, married to a woman named Esther, born 1835 in England. He was probably the same Edward Grayson who was a resident of Chicago when he enlisted as a Private on February 23, 1864, in Company K, Twenty-second Illinois infantry and was mustered the following day. Again, there is no further record.

No pension seems to be available.

In 1890 there was one Edward Grayson living in Mount Pleasant, Beaufort County, South Carolina; no civil war service is recorded.

George Ellis

George Ellis was born 1839 in England.

George left England in the late 1850s and immigrated to the United States, eventually settling in central Michigan. By 1860 George was working as a day laborer and living at the Butterfield Hotel in Lansing’s First Ward. In early 1861 he was probably still residing in Lansing when he was reported as a member of the Lansing militia company called the “Williams’ Rifles”, whose members would serve as the nucleus of Company G.

George was 22 years old and still living in Lansing when he enlisted as Third Sergeant in Company G on May 10, 1861; he may have been related to Eugene Ellis. By June of 1862 George was Orderly Sergeant for the company, and he was shot in the hip on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run. On September 2 Homer Thayer of Company G wrote that Ellis had been wounded in the hip and Thayer thought it “probably mortal.”

In fact, George died as a result of his wounds on September 2, at Washington, DC, and was buried on September 3 in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldier's Home National cemetery), section C no. 3255 (see photo G-640).

No pension seems to be available.

William Courser

William Courser was born in July 26, 1836, either in England or in New Brunswick, Canada, the son of John and Abigail (Kitchen).

After immigrating to the United States, William eventually settled in Michigan and by 1860 was a mill worker living at the Lyman Mason or Charles Hubbard mill boarding house in Muskegon, Muskegon County.

He was 24 years old and still living in Muskegon County when he enlisted in Company H on May 13, 1861. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers”, was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.) William was reported as a wagoner from July of 1862 through December, in January of 1863 he was a teamster with the Brigade wagon train through May of 1864, and was mustered out of service on June 20, 1864.

After his discharge from the army William probably returned to Michigan where he married Mrs. Marilla Porter Williams (d. 1928) on April 13, 1865.

He lived in Ludington, Mason County for some years after the war, working as a laborer; indeed he was living in the Fourth Ward in 1890 and in Ludington in 1900. He was admitted to the Michigan Soldiers Home (no. 3793) around 1902 and living at the Home in June of 1905 when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association.

In 1883 he applied for and received pension (no. 796,892), drawing $30.00 per month in 1912.

Although no record exists of his having been discharged from the Home and then subsequently readmitted, he was living in Muskegon in 1910 -- implying a discharge from the Home.

William died of organic heart disease at 10:00 p.m. on November 7, 1913, in the Home hospital. Funeral services were conducted at the Home by the Home Chaplain, Rev. J. K. Stark at 2:00 p.m. on November 10. He was interred in the Home cemetery: section 6 row 8 grave no. 10.

His widow died in 1928 at the Michigan Soldiers’ Home and is buried on the same lot with William.

Richard Cottrell - updated 5/13/2019

(Thanks to Gail Gordon for sending the findagrave link to Richard’s grave marker in Lowell, MA)

Richard Cottrell was born on January 3, 1840 in Birmingham, England, the son of Abraham and Ann.

Richard was living with his widowed mother in Birmingham in 1850. He left England and immigrated to the United States in 1858 eventually settling in Michigan. By 1860 he was working for and/or living with George Lathrop, a nurseryman in Lansing’s 1st Ward. (He later claimed that in 1860 he was living with the attorney William Chapman in Lansing’s 2nd Ward but he does not appear on the census list for the Chapman family.)

Shortly after war broke out Richard became a member of the Lansing militia company called the “Williams’ Rifles,” whose members would serve as the nucleus of Company G.

Richard was 20 years old, stood 5’4” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and still living in Lansing when he enlisted with the consent of the Justice of the Peace in Company G on May 10, 1861. While the regiment was forming in Grand Rapids, Frank Siverd, also of Company G, wrote home to Lansing that by June 10 Richard had been with the company some time. “He likes camp life and has become quite a soldier.” Richard was reported a Corporal on February 27, 1863 and mustered out of service at Detroit on June 27, 1864.

Richard was probably in Massachusetts when he enlisted at Franklin, as a private in Company G, 2nd Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. He was discharged on June 26, 1865, at New Berne, North Carolina.

After the war Richard eventually returned to Lansing where he worked as a cooper for some years. By 1876, however, he had moved back east and was living in Lowell, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, when he became a citizen of the U.S.

Richard was probably living in Lowell where he married Canadian-born Harriet Matilda Earl (1853-1903) on April 4, 1881; they had at least one child, a son: James or John Samuel.

Richard was apparently living in Lansing in October of 1891 when he joined the Grand Army of the Republic Charles Foster Post No. 42 in Lansing; he was suspended from the post in December of 1898, possibly as a result of not paying his dues. That same year he and his wife and son were living in St. Jerusalem, Quebec, Canada.

Richard eventually returned to Massachusetts and by March of 1907 he was residing at 256 Lowell Street in Lawrence, Essex County, Massachusetts.

In 1910 he was apparently living alone in Lawrence’s 3rd Ward, Essex County, Massachusetts and still living in Lawrence in 1915. In 1920 he listed himself as a widower and was boarding with the Veacock family in Lawrence.

In 1891 he applied for and received pension no. 816114 for service in both units.

Richard was probably a widower when he died on October 3, 1921, in Lawrence and is buried in Edson Cemetery, Lowell, Massachusetts (his government stone notes only his service in the artillery).

Interestingly, in 1933, J. M. Couse, an attorney for Richard’s son, John Samuel Cottrell, wrote to the US Pension Bureau attempting to learn whether Richard had in fact been married previous to his marriage to Harriet. “There is a rumor,” wrote Couse on October 14, 1933, “that Richard Cottrell had been previously married and that a son was born of such previous marriage whose name is the same as that of my client, John Samuel Cottrell, and that this earlier son died while in the Naval Service of the United States in San Francisco. Thus far such earlier marriage is a rumor and no more, . . .” It remains a rumor to this day.

Henry Clay

Henry Clay was born February 22, 1849, in England.

Henry eventually emigrated from England and settled in the United States. In 1860 there was one Henry Clay, born in England in 1847, living with his father William D. (b. 1825), a farm laborer, in Antrim, Shiawassee County.

Henry stood 5’3” with gray eyes, light hair and a dark complexion, and was an 18-year-old laborer living in Campbell, Ionia County when he enlisted in Company I on February 2, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Campbell, and was mustered the same day. He joined the Regiment February 17 at Camp Bullock, Virginia, and was transferred to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864.

He was reported absent sick in July of 1864, and mustered out on July 5, 1865 at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

It is not known if Henry returned to Michigan. By 1870 he was working as a farmer and living in Lancaster County, Nebraska.

Henry married Missouri native Manda J. Dudley (b. 1850) and they had at least five children: James D. (adopted), George B. (b. 1877), William (b. 1879), Minnie C. and Josephine (b. 1881, Mrs. Charles Smothers). Manda had been married at least once before and had two sons from her previous marriage.

By 1877 Henry and Manda were living in Kansas and in Nebraska in 1879. By 1880 Henry was working as a laborer and living with his wife and children and two stepsons in Panama, Lancaster County, Nebraska. By the early 1880s Henry was probably still living in Nebraska (where his daughter had been born), but eventually settled in Missouri. By 1890 Henry was living in Blue, Jackson County, Missouri. He and Manda eventually divorced.

Sometime around 1916 Henry, who had worked as a laborer, went to live with his daughter Josephine and her husband Charles Smothers and their children in Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri, and he remained with them for at least 12 years.

In January of 1927 he married Laura Ward in Kansas City, Missouri; but they were together just a short time when the two separated.

Laura was living in Panama City, Nebraska in 1928, and in San Bernardino, California in 1929. In July of 1929 Henry sued Laura for divorce and the decree was entered into the record in Jackson County, Missouri. Nevertheless the Pension Bureau found in Laura’s favor when she sought to gain access to half of his pension and they accepted her argument that he had in fact deserted her in January of 1927.

In 1874 he applied for and received a pension (no. 130619).

Henry was living in Kansas City, Missouri, where he died on January 31, 1933, and the funeral was held at the Rose and Henderson funeral home. Henry was buried in Panama Cemetery, Panama, Nebraska on February 2, 1933.

Frederick Brooks - updated 1/28/2017

Frederick Brooks was born on July 21, 1844, in London, England, the son of William Brooks and Louise Langly.

Frederick immigrated to the United States with his family, and by 1850 he was living with a large number of Brooks and Langlys in Shelby, Macomb County. He eventually settled in Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan, where he was living when the war broke out. He stood 5’7” with a light complexion, grey eyes and light hair and was a 16-year-old mechanic residing in Detroit, when he enlisted with the consent of his parents in Company G on May 8, 1861. (He may have been related to John Brooks who also came Wayne County but who enlisted in Company F.)

In August of 1862 Frederick was reported as a company washer-man, and from September through November of 1862 he was a company cook. On about June 20, 1863, Fred claimed later, he contracted rheumatism; he also suffered from hemorrhaging of the left lung and an injury to his right groin.

In July of 1863 Frederick was sent to the hospital (probably Patterson Park in Baltimore, Maryland), where he remained through November, and was transferred to the 71st Company, 2nd Battalion, Veterans Reserve Corps (VRC) on December 15, 1863, reportedly due to “hemorrhage of the lungs.” He may have been transferred to the VRC as early as September of 1863. Why he was transferred to the VRC remains a mystery, although apparently he suffered from some debilitating disease or perhaps the effects of being wounded, but the record is unclear on this point.

In any event, he was eventually discharged from the 71st company, 2nd Battalion, VRC, at Patterson Park hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, on June 9, 1864.

Fred never returned to Michigan and settled in Memphis, Tennessee soon after he left the army. For some years he worked on the railroad and also spent time as a steam boat captain.

He may have been working as a miller and living with the Arthur family in McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee in 1870. Fred was residing in Tennessee when he married his first wife, Mary J. Shelby (d. 1877), in Winchester, Tennessee, on September 20, 1870. They had at least three children: Louisa Shelby (1871-1872), Fred Shelby (b. 1873), William Edward (b. 1874) and John (b. 1879).

Fred married his second wife, Eliza Harsh, on June 19, 1878, in Rolling Fork, Mississippi, and they had at least one child, a son Frank J. (b. 1879). He and Eliza were divorced in Memphis, in November of 1900 (he was the defendant).

By 1880 Fred was working as a traveling agent for an oil works and living with his wife and children in Chelsea, Shelby County, Tennessee. By 1892 Fred was residing at 174 Fourth Street in Memphis. He was living with Eliza and his son Frank in Memphis 3rd Ward, Shelby County, Tennessee in 1900.

He married a third time to Laura Aycock, in August of 1907, in Memphis and that they left Tennessee in 1908. Fred claimed that in 1908 they moved to Texas, then Oklahoma, finally settling in Kansas. He noted that by 1908 he was living in Paoli, Garvin County, Oklahoma. By 1910 Fred was living alone and working as a commercial traveler in Memphis 3rd Ward.

Fred was back in Kansas, apparently living in Crawford County in the fall of 1913 when he sued Laura for divorce on the grounds of desertion and abandonment, and was granted a divorce from her on October 16, 1913.

Fred and Laura were divorced in October of 1913, in Crawford County, Kansas.

By April of 1915 Fred was residing in Frontenac, Crawford County, Kansas.

In 1880 he applied for and received pension no. 881557, drawing $25.00 per month by 1914, $30.00 per month by 1919 and $50.00 per month by 1923. He was a Protestant.

Fred was admitted to the National Military Northwestern branch National Military Home in Milwaukee, Wisconsin from Knoxville, Tennessee on October 28, 1917. He listed his nearest relative as a son, F. S. Brooks living 6237 Woodlawn Ave., in Chicago (this was probably Fred Shelby Brooks). He was admitted to the Danville Branch, National Military Home on December 4, 1919, transferred to the Mountain Branch, National Military Home on December 22, 1919, and living with his son Fred in Chicago in January of 1920. Fred was readmitted to the Danville Branch from the Mountain Branch Home on February 12, 1920 and discharged on May 4, 1920. He was subsequently admitted to the National Military Northwestern branch National Military Home in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on October 4, 1920 and discharged on August 16, 1921 and readmitted on October 1. Fred eventually moved in with his son Fred S., at his home at 2324 West. Street in Morgan Park, Illinois, near Chicago.

Frederick became seriously ill in late August of 1923. He was listed as a widower and retired coal dealer when he died of chronic nephritis and myocarditis at his son’s home in Morgan Park, while he was on leave from the National Military Home in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on September 2, 1923. Fred was reportedly buried in Mt. Hope cemetery in Chicago.

John Broad

John Broad was born around 1833 in England.

John eventually immigrated to the United States and by the late 1850s had settled in Michigan.
He was living in Lansing, Ingham County, when he married New York native Charlotte Sherman (nee Baldwin?, 1830-1907) on October 27, 1859, in Lansing (she had been married one before, probably to a Mr. Sherman and had one daughter by her previous marriage).

By 1860 John was working as a farmer and his wife was working as a dressmaker and they were living in the Lansing's Second Ward; John's stepdaughter Mary, also called Minnie, was living with them as well. (Also living with them in 1860 was a 50-year-old New York "tailoress" named Bethany Baldwin.)

Shortly after the war broke out John became a member of the Lansing militia company called the “Williams’ Rifles”, whose members would serve as the nucleus of Company G, Third Michigan infantry.

John was 28 years old and still living in Lansing when he enlisted in Company G on May 10, 1861. He was wounded severely in the left arm and face on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, and eventually admitted to the hospital on David’s Island in the East River, New York harbor. On July 14, from David’s Island he was sent home on furlough to recover from his wounds, and by late July he was back home in Lansing where he was interviewed by the editor of the Lansing State Republican. John explained that during the battle of Fair Oaks he was left behind

in charge of some commissary stores, while the Regiment was ‘double quicked’ to the point to meet the enemy. When the Regiment had arrived at the point of attack, and were about to open fire on the enemy, the commissary guard [John] having taken a musket belonging to a wounded soldier in the hospital hard by came up puffing and blowing in an awful way, and after pausing a moment to recover breath, cried out to the officer in command: “Lieutenant, did you think I could stay guarding two barrels of pork, while the boys were fighting? No sir! I could not do any such thing. I want to pitch in along with the rest.” “Fall in”, was the reply, and he did fall in and fight bravely. He fired six times, and as he was loading for the seventh round, he received a ball in his left arm shattering it terribly, and at the same moment a buck shot entered his cheek, passed across under his nose, and lodged in his right temple, where it remains. For a time he was deprived of his sight entirely, but has now so far recovered as to be able to see with his left eye, but not much with his right. His arm is doing well and he expects to report himself for duty on the 15th of August.

A Detroit newspaper which printed the same story added that “the ball still remains in his face, but he says he feels no pain from it, but merely a great weight in his cheek.” According to later testimony, John was shot “in the left arm . . . splintering the bone badly also buckshot or piece of shell struck under the left eye and passed through and lodged under the right eye causing partial blindness.”

Although John was reported absent sick from June through November in the New York hospital, he was still home in Lansing in August, possibly on furlough from David’s Island hospital in New York. On August 5, 1862, Lieutenant Joseph Mason, then commanding Company G and detached on recruiting service in Michigan, wrote to Colonel Smith in Detroit that he had “been round the different towns adjacent to Lansing and find that the feeling among the people is, that they will go when ‘obliged to’. I have found two of my company here who have been wounded at Fair Oaks. They are not in condition to return to their company, as their wounds are not yet healed. They are men who could exert considerable influence here were they detailed. The names are John Broad and William Clark.” Nevertheless, on August 11 John reported for duty at Detroit Barracks. According to one source, John was sent to a hospital in Detroit (probably Harper hospital), where he remained through October.

By the end of 1862 John had still not fully recovered from his wounds, but had nevertheless apparently returned to the Regiment. He was reported in the Regimental hospital from December of 1862 through September of 1863, although one wonders if he ever did in fact rejoin the regiment. He was reported on detached service in late April of 1863, serving with a supply train. (Interestingly, he was a recipient of Kearny Cross, supposedly for his participation in the battle of Chancellorsville, May 3, 1863.)

In any case, he was treated for congestive fever from February 12 until the 28th and returned to duty. He was then treated for syphilis from September 24 until the 27th, for gonorrheal orchitis from October 31 until November 18, for syphilis from November 23 until December 4 when he was apparently returned to duty. He was in the Regimental hospital in February when he was treated for influenza from the 28th until March 3, 1864, and returned to duty. He was mustered out on June 20, 1864, at Detroit.

After his discharge from the army John returned to his home in Lansing. “We were glad to welcome back to his home,” the editor of the Republican wrote on June 29, 1864, “that well tried and brave veteran, John Broad, of this city, Company G.”

Three years later, in 1867, Broad took a job as janitor in the State Capitol building in Lansing, a position he held for more than twenty years. By 1870 he was working as porter at the state capitol and living with his wife, his stepdaughter “Minnie” Sherman and Bethany Baldwin in Lansing’s First Ward. And by 1880 he was working as a constable and living in Lansing with Charlotte and his stepdaughter Mary. Indeed, he lived in Lansing the rest of his life. In 1910 he was living in Lansing’s Fifth Ward.

He was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association and the Grand Army of the Republic Foster Post No. 42 in Lansing until he was suspended on December 16, 1884, and dropped on April 1, 1885. Apparently he was reinstated in May of 1894, but again suspended in June of 1897 and dropped in June of 1898.

In 1864 he applied for and received pension no. 57,667, drawing $14.00 per month in 1883, and $40 per month by 1906 and 1915.

John was probably living with his step-daughter, Minnie Sherman at her home at 424 N. Cedar Street, in Lansing, when he was taken seriously ill on September 2, 1915. He never recovered and was a widower when he died of apoplexy at his step-daughter’s home on September 4, 1915.

He was buried as an indigent soldier on September 8 in Mt. Hope cemetery in Lansing: section G, lot no. 16, grave no. 8.

William Bennett

William Bennett was born 1833 in England.

William eventually immigrated to the United States, settling in western Michigan.

He stood 5’10” with gray eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion and was a 37-year-old farmer possibly living in Ronald, Ionia County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company E on January 27, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered the same day, crediting Ronald. (Company E was composed in large part by men from Clinton and Ingham counties, as well as parts of Ionia County.)

He joined the Regiment on February 10, and was present for duty through April. He was reportedly wounded in the back of the neck by a shell fragment during action at the North Anna River, Virginia, on or about May 27, 1864. In any case, he was apparently serving with the regiment and was transferred to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was reported absent sick from June 12, 1864, and then again through October and indeed through the spring of 1865.

In fact, William was admitted to Lincoln General Hospital in Washington, DC, on June 15, and was treated for a contusion of the lumbar region, reportedly as a result of being wounded on June 1 at Cold Harbor, Virginia. He was transferred on July 28, to the general hospital in York, Pennsylvania, where he arrived the following day. He stated at the time that “he was injured by a tree falling upon him before Petersburg, Va., the beginning of June”. However, the examining physician noted that William “pretends to be unable to maintain the erect position, [yet there is] no evidence of any injury.” William was subsqeuently furloughed from the hospital on November 1, readmitted on November 22, and then returned to duty on November 28.

He was listed as present at the end of April of 1865, and was mustered out July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war William returned to Michigan and lived for for two or three years in Lowell, Kent County and may have spent some time in Gratiot County as well.

In the early 1880s, possibly around 1883, he moved west, eventually settling in Shelton, Buffalo County, Nebraska, where he worked as a farmer and laborer. By 1885 he was living in Shelton, Nebraska.

He was living in Shelton in 1886 when he applied for a pension (claim no. 564,777) but the certificate was never granted.

William was living in Grand Island (possibly at the State Soldier’s Home), Hall County, Nebraska, when he married his second wife, Mrs. Catharine Hare (b. 1835, widow of Sylvester Hare) on June 2, 1888, in Grand Island.

On July 21, 1891, William was admitted to the Nebraska Hospital for the Insane in Lincoln. On November 30, 1891, George Spencer, a Justice of the peace in Grand island wrote to the pension bureau responding to their inquiry about William Bennett’s pension application. “Sometime ago Mr. Bennett became so feeble that he was wholly past all work & became a public charge & was supported a few days at our Co. poor house & then admitted to our Soldiers Home [in Grand Island]. He became violently insane & was sent to” Lincoln, Nebraska “and is still there with no prospect of recovery. He has a wife something over 50 years of age.”

Indeed, William remained a patient in Lincoln until he died of consumption on February 20, 1892, and was reportedly buried at Grand Island.

His widow applied for a pension (no. 545278), but the certificate was never granted.