Hooker cemetery

Stiles A. Watkins

Stiles A. Watkins was born on January 15, 1843, in Pomfret, Windsor County, Vermont, the son of Ransel (b. 12812) and Hannah (Hunt, b. 1816).

Vermont-native Ransel married Connecticut-born Hannah and they eventually settled in Vermont, although according to government records Silas’ parents were both born in Vermont and presumably married there.

In any case, Silas left Vermont, probably with his family and moved west, eventually settling in Michigan.

In 1850 there was one Lyman Watkins (b. 1818 in New York or Vermont) working as a carpenter with some $1000 worth of real estate and living with his wife New York native Sylvina (b. 1823) in Allegan village. In 1860 Lyman was listed as a wealthy druggist and living with his wife Sylvina in Allegan, Allegan County, and next door to Lyman lived Edward Wheelock who would join the Third Michigan in 1861.

Sometime between 1850 and 1860 Stiles’ father died and his mother married a wealthy farmer named William S. Hooker, presumably in Michigan and probably in Allegan County. (In 1850 Hooker, then living on a large farm in Allegan County, was married to Vermont native Mary (b. 1821) and they had one child, an infant girl Marcia.)

Stiles was probably the same ‘Silas A.” Watkins who was working as a farm laborer and living with William S. Hooker and his family in Leighton, Allegan County in 1860.

Silas stood 5’6’ with blue eyes, light hair and a fair complexion and was a 19-year-old farm laborer possibly living in Leighton, Allegan County when he enlisted in Company F on August 14, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered the same day at Detroit. He joined the Regiment on September 8 at Fairfax Seminary, Virginia, and was wounded by a gunshot on May 3, 1863, at Chancellorsville, Virginia.

He was subsequently hospitalized and probably still absent wounded when he was transferred to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, where he was reported as transferred to the Veterans’ Reserve Corps as of September 16, 1863. (The VRC was made up of men who while ambulatory were generally incapable of performing regular military tasks due to having suffered debilitating wounds and/or diseases and were assigned to garrison the many supply depots, draft rendezvous, camps, forts, prisons, etc. scattered throughout the northern sities, thus freeing able-bodied men for regular military duty.)

Stiles was mustered out on July 19, 1865, from Company B, First VRC in Elmira, New York.

Stiles eventually returned to Michigan.

Stiles was married to New York native Delvina L. Cross (1841-1916), and they had at least six children: Alonzo (1868-1916), Emma (b. 1870), Ellen (b. 1873), Alexander (b. 1876), Cornelia (b. 1878) and Thomas C. (b. 1883).

By 1870 Stiles or Styles was working as a farmer (he owned $2000 worth of real estate) and living with his wife and two children in Leighton, Allegan County, and they were still living on a farm in Leighton in 1880. He was living in Corning, Allegan County in 1888, and residing in Wayland or Leighton, Allegan County in 1890 and in Leighton, Allegan County in 1894. He was working as a a farmer and living with Delvina and three sons in Leighton in 1900. Near by lived Vermont-born Francis R. (b. 1845) and his family. Stiles was working as a a farmer and living with Delvina in Leighton in 1910; next door lived his son “Alle” and his family.

In 1878 he applied for and received a pension (no. 158229), for service in Compny F, Twenty-third Michigan infantry. This was most likely a typographical error and the reference should be to the Third Michigan infantry.

Stiles probably died a widower on July 21, 1923, in Wayland, and was buried in Hooker cemetery, Allegan County.

Simond Cramer Stanton UPDATE 13 July 2018

Simond Cramer Stanton was born in 1831 in Michigan, the son of David Stanton and Elizabeth Jennings (b. 1799). 

Between 1828 and 1836 the family moved to Michigan and by 1850 Simond (listed as “Cramer” or “Craman”) was living with his mother in Tallmadge, Ottawa County; living with them was Simond’s younger brother John who would also join the 3rd Michigan. 

Simond (or Simon) married New York native Ellen (b. 1830), and they had at least four children: Ruben (b. 1853), Frank E. (b. 1857), George W. (b. 1859) and John (b. 1862). They were living in Michigan in 1853 and by 1860 Simon was working as a day laborer and living with his wife and three children in Hastings, Barry County. By the summer of 1863 he was listed as single (“Craman”) and working as a laborer in Hastings.

Simond stood 5’8” with blue eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion and was 30 years old and working as a well digger possibly in Maple Grove, Barry County when he enlisted in Company E on February 8, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Maple Grove, and was mustered the same day. (John Stanton, who may have been his younger brother, joined Company G in late 1861.) He joined the Regiment on March 27, was transferred (as was John) to Company E, 5th Michigan Infantry upon consolidation of the 3rd and 5th Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was reported as a teamster (so was John Stanton) at headquarters in May of 1865. He was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana. 

Simond returned to Michigan after the war, possibly to Ottawa County. 

He married Ohio native Maranda V. (1847-1924), and they had at least three children: Eve (1873-1945, Mrs. Corning), Guy (1878-1903), and “Freddie” (d. 1866). 

By 1870 Simon was working in a sawmill and living with his wife and son John in Spring Lake, Ottawa County. By 1881 he was living in Pierson, Montcalm County, as was his brother John. In 1880 Simon along with his wife and two children were living in Leighton, Allegan County. The following year Simon was reported as living in Wood Lake (location unknown today), and in Leighton, Allegan County in 1894. He was a member of the Old 3rd Michigan Infantry Association.

In 1880 he applied for and received a pension (no. 745951). 

Simond was probably living at home when he died of diabetes on March 14, 1895, in Leighton, Allegan County, and was buried in Hooker cemetery. 

In April of 1895 his widow, Maranda, was living in Michigan when she applied for and received a pension (no. 415779). By 1900 Maranda was living in the women’s annex, Michigan Soldier’s Home in Grand Rapids. By 1910 she was renting a house at 123 W. Leonard Street in Grand Rapids’ 6th Ward.

Charles W. Furber

Charles W. Furber, also known as “Ferber,” was born 1842 in Ohio, the son of Charles (b. 1808) and Mary (b. 1817).

Charles (elder) left England and immigrated to the United States where he met Ohio native Mary. They were married sometime before 1840 when they were living in Pennsylvania. By 1844 they had moved to Ohio where they resided for some years. Charles and Mary took their family and moved to Michigan from Ohio sometime between 1848 and 1850 when Charles (younger) was attending school with his siblings and living with his family in Leighton, Allegan County where his father was a farmer. By 1860 Charles was a farm laborer living in Leighton on the family farm.

He was 19 years old and probably living in the vicinity of Hastings, Barry County when he enlisted in the Hastings Rifle Company in April of 1861. The company was disbanded shortly after it arrived in Grand Rapids and its members distributed to other companies of the Third Michigan infantry then forming at Cantonment Anderson just south of the city. Charles eventually enlisted with his guardian’s or parents’ consent in Company K on May 13, 1861. He was wounded, probably only slightly, on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, but he was nonetheless sent to Carver Hospital in Washington, DC, and then to a hospital at Fort McHenry, Baltimore, Maryland. In October he was reported absent sick in a general hospital where he remained through May of 1863.

It is possible that he returned to duty and was either wounded on May 3, 1863, at Chancellorsville, Virginia, or became ill sometime in May or early June; it is also possible that he never returned to duty but simply transferred to another hospital.

In any case, on June 7, 1863, he was reported in a general hospital in Alexandria, Virginia where he remained through December. But according to Andrew Kilpatrick, also of Company E, Charles was present for duty with the regiment when he was nearly killed in a diving accident while the men were swimming in Hegemon Creek. According to official records, however, he remained hospitalized, as a Corporal, until he was mustered out on June 20, 1864, at Detroit.

It seems quite likely that Charles was so seriously injured in his diving into a submerged tree stump in the River that he never recovered.

In 1865 Charles applied for and received a pension (no. 51797). He apparently returned to his family home in Allegan County where he died on October 5, 1865, presumably from wounds or sickness contracted while in the army, and was buried at Hooker cemetery in Leighton. (However there seems to be no marker for him or his family.)

His parents were still living in Leighton, Allegan County in 1870 and 1880.

Allegan county cemeteries

On Friday I spent several hours touring a handful of Allegan county cemeteries looking for men of the Third Michigan Infantry, and the trip was largely successful.

In Wayland I visited Hill cemetery, located east of town on 4th st. just south off of 135th ave. I also visited Elmwood cemetery, just south of town off of 10th st. (A45). The cemetery is split into two halves divided by the highway, with the older graves found generally on the west side of the road.

I retraced my steps back through Wayland and headed east again on 135th ave. but when I reached 4st st. I turned left or north and drove a couple of miles north to Hooker cemetery in Leighton township.

I then meandered my way to Allegan, the county seat, where I stopped by the enormous Oakwood cemetery. Unfortunately no one available to help me find the three guys I was looking for there and since there were no division markers I moved on to Taylor cemetery in Ganges township. Taylor is located on 68th st., also known as Blue Star Highway, just south of rte 89.