Johnson

Warren M. Johnson

Warren M. Johnson, also known as “Johnstone,” born 1836 in Canada.

Warren immigrated to the United States. He was married to Michigan native Ann (b. 1840), probably in Michigan, and they had at least one child: a daughter Delno (b. 1860). By 1860 Warren was living with his wife and child in Otsego, Allegan County.

He was 25 years old and probably still living in Allegan County when he enlisted as First Corporal in Company F on May 13, 1861. He was probably taken prisoner sometime between June 30 and July 1, 1862, possibly near Malvern Hill, Virginia. According to the Detroit Free Press, in mid-July Johnson was among a group of Michigan soldiers who were reported to be “at the hospital on the York River, held by the rebels.” The Free Press quoted the New York Herald report “that the joy of the poor wounded soldiers at their anticipated release was very great, but when they were informed that they must return to the hospital again and be held there as prisoners, their grief was indescribable, especially among those who were sick. The scene was heartrending.”

By late August Warren was at Camp Parole, Annapolis, Maryland, and was admitted to the hospital in Annapolis where he was reported in July as a clerk and listed as a private, an indication that he was probably reduced to the ranks at some point perhaps as a consequence of his “missing in action” since July 1. Indeed, he was eventually dropped from the rolls on December 20, 1862 by authority of War Department General Order no. 92 (1862), for being AWOL.

There is no further record and no pension seems to be available.

In 1870 there was one Warren Johnson, age 38, born in Quebec, working as a farmer and living with is wife Ohio native Julia (b. 1845), and their two children: Harvey (b. 1860) and Elizabeth (b. 1865), in Otsego, Allegan County.

There was a civil war veteran named Warren Johnson living in Kalamazoo’s First ward, Kalamazoo County, in 1894.

Richard P. Johnson - update 8/29/2016

Richard P. Johnson was born in 1838 in New York, the son of Andrew (d. 1842) and Catherine A. (Penny).

Richard’s parents were married in December of 1834 in New York City. The family left New York State and eventually settling in western Michigan. By 1850 Richard was living with the Michael Cromiger or Croniger family in Cascade, Kent County and attending school with one of the Cromiger children (although curiously his place of birth is listed as unknown). By 1860 Richard was working as a farm laborer and living at the Western Exchange Hotel in Cascade, which was operated by Daniel Cromiger (who had lived next door to Michael Cromiger in 1850). Shortly before the war broke out Richard joined the Valley City Guard, a prewar Grand Rapids’ militia company many of whose members would form the nucleus for Company A.

Richard was 23 years old when he enlisted in Company A on May 13, 1861.

He was killed in action on May 3, 1863, at Chancellorsville, Virginia, reportedly by an exploding shell, and was buried in Fredericksburg National Cemetery: grave no. 2965 (or old 2).

In June of 1863 his mother was living in Willoughby, Lake County, Ohio when she applied for and received a pension (no. 16873).


Oscar Johnson

Oscar Johnson was born on February 7, 1839, in Michigan.

By 1860 Oscar was working as a switchman on the railroad and living with A. B. Durfee in Linden, Genesee County, Michigan.

He was 23 years old and possibly working in Muskegon, Muskegon County when he enlisted in Company H on April 28, 1861. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.) He was wounded on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, and by late June he was reported in the hospital at White House Landing, Virginia, suffering from fever. He apparently recovered and was transferred to Battery F, Third United States artillery on January 29, 1863, at Camp Pitcher, Virginia. He was mustered out on May 13, 1864, at Chancellorsville, Virginia.

Following his discharge from the army Oscar eventually returned to Genesee County and settled in Flint where he probably lived the rest of his life.

He was married to Michigan native Elizabeth (1833-1907). Elizabeth may have been married before (if so her name was probably Shepherd), and probably had two children from her previous marriage: a son (b. 1854) and a daughter (b. 1862).

By 1880 Oscar was working in a paper mill and reportedly married but was boarding with the David West (?) family in Flint. He was residing at 316 Stone Street in December of 1888 when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, and in the First Ward in 1890 and in 1894 when he was suffering from chronic diarrhea, piles, and “sore eyes.” He was still living on Stone Street in Flint in 1907 when his wife died, and he was in Flint in 1911.

Oscar was a member of Grand Army of the Republic Crapo Post No. 145 in Flint, a Protestant and he received a pension (no. 273608), dated May of 1880.

Oscar was a widower when he died of heart disease at his home on Witherbee Street in Flint on June 13 or 15, 1911.

According to a local report, Oscar “was found dead on the floor of his home on Witherbee Street late yesterday afternoon by his stepdaughter, Mrs. George Foote. Johnson was one of the committeemen in charge of the dedication of the Genesee ‘hall of fame’, and Mrs. Foote noticed his absence from the parade. That evening she tried to call him by telephone and again this morning, but without success. Johnson lived alone, and thinking he might be sick, Mr. and Mrs. Foote went to the house yesterday afternoon and found the shades down and the house locked up. They managed to unlock a door and on entering found the aged man’s body upon the floor where he had evidently fallen from an attack of heart disease, his head striking on the base of a coal stove.”

His funeral was held on June 18 at the Masonic Temple (in Flint presumably), and the services were conducted by Rev. E. Randall. Oscar was buried in Avondale cemetery in Flint.

Norman Luther Johnson

Norman Luther Johnson was born in 1838 in Oakland County, Michigan.

In 1850 one Norman Johnson, age 11, and his younger sister (both born in Michigan) were attending school and living with the Joseph Sage family in Farmington, Oakland County.
Norman was married to Michigan native Lydia Lovejoy (b. 1836) on October 20, 1855, in Perry, Shiawassee County, and they had at least four children: Alice, Annie, Wellington and Oscar. (Lydia too had been born in Oakland County.)

Norman stood 5’9” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion, and was 23 years old and possibly living and/or working in Locke, Ingham County when he enlisted in Company G on May 13, 1861. (He may have been related to Amasy Johnson and/or George Johnson both of whom enlisted in Company G.) Norman was badly wounded in the right hand on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, after which he was hospitalized, probably in Judiciary Square hospital in Washington, DC. He was discharged on June 29, 1862, at Upton’s Hill, Virginia for a wound of the right hand “the ball passing . . . backwards between the heads of the metacarpal bones of the index and middle fingers, shattering them to an alarming extent -- he is now unable to use this fingers in the least.”

After he was discharged from the army Norman returned to Michigan and in 1862 he applied for and received a pension (no. 10161).

He was living in Michigan when he reentered the service in Company M, Tenth Michigan cavalry on August 20, 1863, at Locke for 3 years, crediting Locke, and was mustered on October 2 at Grand Rapids where the regiment was organized between September 18 and November 18, 1863, when it was mustered into service. It left Michigan for Lexington, Kentucky on December 1, 1863, and participated in numerous operations, mostly in Kentucky and Tennessee throughout the winter of 1863-64. Most of its primary area of operations would eventually be in the vicinity of Strawberry Plains, Tennessee. (He is listed in both Third infantry and Tenth cavalry Regimental histories. )

Norman was taken sick on January 6, 1864, and subsequently hospitalized at Camp Nelson, Kentucky. He was reportedly wounded by a bayonet in the left eye on May 14, 1864, causing the loss of vision in that eye. He was admitted to a hospital in Louisville, Kentucky, on July 7, 1864, suffering from chronic dysentery and remained hospitalized until his discharge on October 18, 1864, at Brown hospital in Louisville, Kentucky, for “aphonia” (loss of voice) and “also loss of sight of left eye occasioned by a bayonet wound.”

He gave Locke as his mailing address on his discharge from the Tenth cavalry, but by 1867 he was working as a farmer in Conway, Livingston County – although he also listed his address as Locke, Ingham County.

Apparently he and Lydia separated – in fact it appears Norman left her and his children and he apparently married a widow named Eliza A. Goff on December 10, 1870 in Reading, Michigan. (Eliza, who had several children from her first marriage, had been living in Fremont, Indiana when married before meeting Norman.) It wasn’t until 1875, however that he and Lydia were divorced, which took place in Howell, Livingston County, she having charged Norman with desertion and neglect. Norman and Eliza eventually settled in Fremont, Indiana where they lived for many years.

It is not known if Norman returned to Michigan after the war.

While on a trip in search of work, Norman died on December 20, 1883 in Chicago.

In 1891 in Indiana his widow Eliza applied for and was granted a widow’s pension (no. 674378).

Joseph P. Johnson

Joseph P. Johnson was born in 1834.

Joseph was a 27-year-old teamster possibly living in Muskegon County, Michigan, when he enlisted as wagoner in Company H on May 13, 1861. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.) By early July of 1862 he was reported as a patient “at the hospital on the York River, held by the rebels.” The Detroit Free Press quoted a New York Herald report “that the joy of the poor wounded soldiers at their anticipated release was very great, but when they were informed that they must return to the hospital again and be held there as prisoners, their grief was indescribable, especially among those who were sick. The scene was heartrending.”

Joseph was soon reported to have been released at Richmond, Virginia, on parole, and he arrived at Old Point, Virginia, near Fortress Monroe, on the John Tucker, on the afternoon of July 11. By late August he was at Camp Parole, Annapolis, Maryland, and on December 19, 1862, he returned from missing in action status to the Regiment at Camp Pitcher, Virginia.

In fact, however, Joseph had been detached as a wagoner and from January of 1863 through June was serving with the Brigade wagon train, probably as a teamster. In July he was with the supply train, in October was reported on detached service since October 29, and was on detached service as a teamster from November of 1863 through January of 1864, absent sick in February, returned to Brigade headquarters in March, was on duty with the Brigade wagon and ambulance trains in April, and in May was in the Brigade train. He was mustered out of service on June 20, 1864.

He may have been the same Joseph P. Johnson who had served as a teamster for the U.S. Army during the war, and who by 1919 (?) was living in Missouri, drawing a pension (no. 1223749).

According to the SUVCW, however, he died in 1888, presumably in Kent County and was buried in Courtland cemetery.

John Johnson

John Johnson was born in 1824 in Bingham, Somerset County, Maine.

John left Maine and moved westward, eventually settling in western Michigan by early 1864.

He stood 5’6” with dark eyes, hair and a dark complexion and was a 40-year-old laborer possibly living in Muskegon, Muskegon County when he enlisted in Company F on February 1, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Muskegon, and was mustered the same day. (He was possibly related to the brothers Eli and Ira Johnson both of whom also enlisted in Company F.) John joined the Regiment on February 27 at Camp Bullock, Virginia, was severely wounded in the left side and arm on May 12, at Spotsylvania, Virginia, and subsequently absent sick in the hospital. He apparently returned to the Regiment and was probably wounded again on June 1, 1864, near Cold Harbor, Virginia. In any case, he was still absent wounded when he was transferred to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and remained absent until he was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

According to one source John died on November 28, 1918, presumably in Kent County, and was buried in Brooklawn cemetery, in Grand Rapids.

Ira G. Johnson

Ira G. Johnson was born on May 19, 1846 in Ohio, the son of David M. (1817-1892) and Chloe (Munson, 1817-1885).

David took his family and left Ohio and by 1857 had settled in Michigan. By 1860 Ira was attending school and living with his family in Casnovia, Muskegon County.

Ira stood 5’9” with blue eyes, dark hair and a light complexion, and was a 17-year-old farmer possibly working in Tyrone, Kent County when he enlisted in Company F on February 8, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Tyrone, and was mustered the same day. (His older brother Eli had joined Company F in 1861, and they were both possibly related to John Johnson who also enlisted in Company F.) Ira joined the Regiment on March 27, was wounded on May 12, at Spotsylvania, Virginia, and subsequently hospitalized. He was still absent wounded in the hospital when he was transferred to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and he remained absent wounded through January of 1865. He was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

Following his discharge from the army Ira returned to western Michigan and settled for a time in Casnovia.

He was married to New York native Eunice A. (b. 1855), and they had at least one child: Harriet (b. 1876).

By 1880 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife and daughter in Tyrone, Kent County. 1885 he was living in Sparta, Kent County and in 1888 and 1890 he was residing in Casnovia, Tyrone Township, Kent County. In 1920 he was living with his older sister Rachel Squires in Casnovia. (Another sister Mary and her daughter lived nearby.)

Ira was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic Bonner Post No. 306 in Casnovia, as well as the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association. In 1864 he applied for and received a pension (no. 444712).

Ira died on July 9, 1921, in Kent City, Michigan, and was buried in South Casnovia cemetery: block O, lot 80, grave N 1.

In 1921 his widow applied for a pension (no. 1179557) but the certificate was never granted.

Gordon F. Johnson

Gordon F. Johnson was born in 1822 in Bennington, Vermont.

Gordon left Vermont and moved westward, eventually settling in northern Michigan sometime before 1864.

He stood 5’6” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was a 42-year-old farmer possibly living in Benzonia, Benzie County when he enlisted in Company E on March 7, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Benzonia, and was mustered the same day. Before leaving to join the Regiment, however, Johnson was mugged and robbed in Grand Rapids.

This city [wrote the Grand Rapids Eagle on March 12] is attaining, just now, an unenviable reputation for crime and criminals. Another outrageous robbery was committed at an early hour last evening [Friday], the circumstances of which as we have learned them are substantially as follows: A few days since, a well dressed and apparently intelligent man calling himself Thomas Averhill, applied to W. Barker’s Boarding Saloon for board, paying his fare one week in advance. He claimed to be a carpenter and joiner, in pursuit of labor, but passed most of his time in the saloon until a day or two since, when he left, returning yesterday afternoon in a buggy with a man named Gordon Johnson, in soldier’s clothes, who said that he was a member of the Third Michigan Infantry. The two men drank repeatedly, and took supper together, Johnson becoming considerably intoxicated in the meantime, and exhibiting his money -- some two hundred dollars of which he was known to have in his possession. In the evening, at 9 o’clock, Averhill invited Johnson to go with him to the Irish American Saloon in the Bronson House, and they left together, nothing more being heard or seen of the men together. Within about twenty minutes from the time these men left, Johnson returned alone to Barker’s Saloon, somewhat bruised and covered with mud and water, and said that he had been robbed -- that this man Averhill induced him to go on to a back street or alley, where he did not know, and getting him where he wished, knocked him down and robbed him of all his money, some two hundred dollars.

This is Johnson’s story which is probably true, as he had money when he left and had none when he returned, and as the man Averhill has not since been seen, hereabouts, although Officer Peak, and others were immediately put upon his track.

We should think that some men, especially those having money, would learn, after a while, the fact that if they must get drunk that it is not safe to do so with much money in their pockets, and particularly so when their companions in drunkenness are strangers.

Gordon eventually joined the Regiment April 4 at Brandy Station, Virginia, and reportedly hospitalized on May 28. He was still absent sick when he was transferred to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and remained absent sick through October of 1864. In January of 1865 he was absent on furlough, probably from the hospital, and in February was still absent, presumably on furlough. He was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

He eventually returned to Michigan.

Gordon was married to one Harriet E.

In September of 1865 Gordon was probably living in Manistee County when he sued Harriet for divorce on the grounds of desertion, and the divorce was granted in his favor. He was subsequently married to Michigan native Parnelia (b. 1843) and/or Nellie.

By 1870 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife Parnelia in Joyfield, Benzie County.

In 1876 Gordon applied for and received a pension (no. 156576).

He died of chronic diarrhea on August 25, 1893, in Joyfield, Benzie County, and was buried in Joyfield Township cemetery.

His widow was living in Honor, Benzie County in 1897 when she applied for and received a pension (no. 372313).

George Johnson

George Johnson was born in 1841 in New York.

George left New York and moved westward, eventually settling in Michigan where by 1860 he was a teamster working for and/or living with Samuel Ronkin, a grocer in Lansing’s First Ward.

By the time the war broke out he had joined the “Williams’ Rifles,” the Lansing militia company whose members would serve as the nucleus of Company G. He was 20 years old and residing in Ingham County, probably Lansing, when he enlisted on July 4 or 8, 1861, in Company G, and was mustered the same day. (He was possibly related to Amasy Johnson and/or Norman Johnson, both of whom enlisted in Company G.) By the end of the month, however, George was reported to be a patient in the City Hospital in Washington with a fever, and in fact was in Columbian College hospital in Washington suffering from “intermittent fever.”

In early September he was reported convalescing in Columbian College Hospital, along with another member of Company G, although, on September 11, the Republican reported that he was in the general hospital in Annapolis, Maryland, suffering from fever.

George was alleged to have deserted on October 4, 1862, at Upton’s Hill, Virginia. In fact, he may have deserted as early as Sunday, September 28. “There was a man,” wrote Edgar Clark of Company G on October 5, who “deserted this company a week ago today. His name was George Johnson, brother of Sam Parker’s wife of the lower town. I do not know what they will do with him if they ever catch him. I think he is too smart to ever be caught.”

There is no further record, and no pension seems to be available.

Eli D. Johnson

Eli D. Johnson was born on September 17, 1843, in Spencer (?), Lucas County, Ohio, the son of David M. (1817-1892) and Chloe (Munson, 1817-1885).

Ohio native David married New York-born Chloe and they settled in Ohio. He took his family and left Ohio and by 1857 had settled in Michigan. By 1860 Eli was working as a farm hand and attending school and living with his family in Casnovia, Muskegon County.

He stood 5’7” with gray eyes, dark hair and a light complexion and was a 17-year-old farmer probably still living with his family in Casnovia when he enlisted in Company F on May 13, 1861. (His younger brother Ira would join Company F in 1864. Eli was possibly related to John Johnson who would also enlist in Company F in 1864 and who was also from Muskegon County.)

According to one report Eli was sick with typhoid fever in early September of 1861, and he was reported sick in his quarters in December of 1861, but he eventually recovered and returned to duty. He was again sick this time in the regimental hospital in late February of 1862 and an the hospital at fortress Monroe, Virginia, in April of 1862.

He returned to duty and was again absent sick in May of 1863, rejoined the Regiment and was wounded in the left thigh on July 2, 1863, probably in the Peach Orchard at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. He was subsequently hospitalized, possibly in Philadelphia. According to Eli, he was “struck by a piece of shell weighing about three ounces” which “entered the fleshy part of leg till it struck and fractured the bone and remained in his leg for twenty-four days when it was cut out by [Dr.] Z. E. Bliss.” Moreover, “at the same time he received a gunshot wound by rifle ball in left elbow just above the joint. He laid on the field till the 4th day of July 1863, when he was carried to field hospital, where he remained about ten days. From thence he was taken to West Building hospital [in Baltimore and] about ten days from thence he was taken to Camden Street hospital where he remained till he was discharged.”

Eli was discharged on January 18, 1864, at Baltimore, Maryland, for “the effects of a gun shot wound (shell) of the left thigh received at the battle of Gettysburg July 2nd, 1863, resulting in the permanent contraction of the muscles on the anterior aspect of the left thigh.” He was declared as “Unfit for Invalid Corps.”

Nevertheless, Eli returned to Casnovia following his discharge, and reentered the service in Company A, Tenth Michigan cavalry on February 20, 1865, at Grand Rapids for 1 year, and was mustered on February 24, crediting Casnovia. (In fact Eli is found in both the Third infantry and Tenth cavalry 1905 Regimental histories.) He joined the Regiment on March 16 at Knoxville, Tennessee, and was mustered out with the regiment on November 11, 1865, at Memphis.

After the war Eli returned to western Michigan and by 1870 he was living with his parents and siblings in Casnovia in 1870.

Eli was married to Harriet Munson; she died in May of 1872. He then married his second wife Irene or Irena M. Munson (b. 1855), on November 22, 1872, in Ogden, Lenawee County, Michigan and they had at least one child, a son Jacob D. (b. 1874).

By 1880 Eli was working as a farmer and living with his wife and son in Hart, Oceana County, and residing in Hart in 1883 when he was drawing $8.00 per month for a wounded left leg (pension no. 25,770, dated 1864), drawing $40 per month by 1909 and $72 per month by 1922.
He was still living in Hart in December of 1886 when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, and in 1888 and 1890, and in Tigris, Oceana County in 1898 and in Hart when he attended the Fiftieth Reunion of the battle of Gettysburg in 1913.

By 1906 he had moved to Pentwater, Oceana County where he lived until 1917.

By 1921 he was living at 21 Cleveland Street in Muskegon, Muskegon County and possibly at 25 Cleveland Street in 1922; he may also have returned briefly to Casnovia, Muskegon County.

Eli was a widower when he died of a cerebral hemorrhage, on April 24, 1922, presumably at his home in Muskegon. He was buried in Randall (Mt. Huftile) cemetery, Hart: lot no. 20.

Amasy Johnson

Amasy or Amasa Johnson was born in 1841 in McDonough (?) County, Illinois.

Amasy left Illinois and came to Michigan, probably around the time the war broke out.

In any case, he stood 5’8” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was a 20-year-old farmer living in Ingham County when he enlisted in Company G on May 10, 1861. (Company G, formerly the “Williams’ Rifles,” was made up predominantly of men from the Lansing area.) He was possibly related to George Johnson and/or Norman Johnson, both of whom also enlisted in Company G.

He was reported sick with fever in early September of 1861, but soon returned to the Regiment and while on picket duty near Munson’s Hill, Virginia, was wounded in the right leg on September 26, 1861, resulting in the amputation of the limb. Frank Siverd, also of Company G described in detail what happened to Johnson.

About 9 a.m., Friday [September 26], Corporal Shattuck, [Abram] Shear and Amsey C. Johnson, ventured beyond the lines, and incautiously leaving cover and appearing in an open lot, they were sighted by a rebel rifleman and Johnson became his victim. He was shot with a minie ball, in the right leg, about half way between the knee and ankle. The ball struck the inner angle of the tibia, and completely shattered both bones. Several pieces of bone come entirely out and lay in his stocking. Shattuck and Shear carried him to our lines and a Surgeon was immediately sent for. Several successive messengers were dispatched for him, and after waiting until 4 p.m. and no Surgeon appearing, he was placed in an ambulance and sent to the hospital. This neglect of the Surgeon, and the subsequent harsh treatment of Johnson is inexcusable, and merits the severest censure -- indeed, the medical department of the Regiment is noted for want of energy in almost every particular. The surgeon sent Johnson to the Infirmary at Washington, where on Saturday his leg was amputated immediately below the knee -- he is doing well. He is universally loved in the company, and was ever prompt in the performance of duty -- never ‘shirking’ when health would permit him to work. This sad affair cast a gloom over the whole company, and many swore over him as he lay suffering extreme pain, and yet uncomplaining, that he should be a hundred fold avenged, and he will be.

Charles Brittain of Company H thought that Johnson “got too smart and ventured over the lines and got paid for his smartness.”

By late November Amasy had been transferred to a hospital in Washington, DC, and one of his comrades reported home that by early December he was a patient in E Street hospital in Washington, DC, suffering from an amputated leg. Johnson was discharged on account of his amputated limb, on January 25, 1862, at Camp Michigan, Virginia. Some weeks later, Frank Siverd observed that Johnson

has received an honorable discharge and is on his way to Michigan. He will carry with him through life a reminder of the sport we used to enjoy at the celebrated Munson Hill. He stops on his way to get an artificial leg, the funds for the purchase of which were contributed by the company. Each enlisted man gave one dollar, Lieutenant [Joseph] Mason ten dollars and twenty dollars were appropriated from the company fund, making a total of one hundred and one dollars. Some of your patriotic citizens who could not make it convenient to face the enemy in the field, could not give greater evidence of their patriotism than by offering to this young man the means to procure a couple of years tuition at one of your excellent educational institutions. He will disdain to be a beggar, and I understand his friends are in limited circumstances and he has not now the means of helping himself. He was an excellent soldier, always doing his duty manfully and without murmur. When he was wounded he lay nine hours without medical attendance, and though in extreme pain he bore it heroically and without complaint.

Amasy listed Okemos, Ingham County on his discharge papers and probably returned to Michigan.

In 1867 he applied for and received a pension (no. 9910).

Amasy was married.

His widow applied for a pension (no. 897044), but the certificate was never granted.