Lewis

Smith K. Lewis - update 8/22/2016

Smith K. Lewis was born on August 10, 1830, in Dix (?), Chemung County, New York, the son of Nathaniel and Sophia Fargo (or Perrigo).

Smith left New York and moved west, eventually settling in western Michigan by 1860 when he was a farm laborer working for and/or living with Nelson Stillwell, in Wright, Ottawa County.

Smith stood 5’5” with blue eyes, auburn hair and a fair complexion and was a 28-year-old farm laborer living in Casnovia, Muskegon County when he enlisted in Company H on May 13, 1861. (He was possibly related to John and/or Ezra Lewis, both of whom enlisted in Company H on May 6.) George Lemon of Company H, apparently had little regard for Smith. He reported many years after the war that while the regiment was engaged at the battle of Fair Oaks, Virginia, on May 31, 1862, he heard it said in the company afterwards “that as soon as the fighting began [Smith] left the ranks and went back to where we had camped. There was nothing matter with him at that time that I knew of. I just heard that he went back.”

Lemon remembered that Smith was “delicate in appearance” and “was quite frequently excused from duty. I know that well because my name came just after his in the company roll and the Orderly Sergeant would come to me and say that Smith K. Lewis was excused from duty and that I should take his place for duty. That happened frequently and I remember [him] well as I had to do extra duty on his account.” Lemon also noted that this tended to happen “mostly during the winter months when we were in camp and the weather was bad.”

Smith was serving with the regiment when it participated in the battle of Groveton (or Second Bull Run) on August 29, 1862. On September 6, 1862, J. F. Doud of Dayton, Newaygo County, wrote home to a friend, William Utley, describing the recent action at Groveton and how the 3rd Michigan had been “cut up badly.” He added “that Smith Lewis came up to our regiment to see me. He is the same Smith who was in the fight [at Groveton] and he said he stood behind a stump and fired five shots and he thought he hit some of them [rebels]. That is five more than I gave them. Probably he hit more than I did but they were as close as I ever want them to come.”

Smith was quite sick off and on during the winter of 1862-63. He was admitted to the regimental hospital on January 14 suffering from cephalgia, and returned to duty the following day; admitted on March 5 for influenza and returned on march 6, again admitted for influenza on March 24 and returned to duty on March 26. Sometime in early April he was admitted for diarrhea and returned to duty on April 14.

Smith was shot in the left foot on July 2, 1863, at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, subsequently hospitalized in West’s building hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, and he remained absent sick and wounded in the hospital until he was mustered out on June 20, 1864, at Detroit.

After his discharge Smith returned to Michigan and worked variously as a farmer and lumberman, probably in Casnovia.

He was living in Plainfield, Kent County when he married Indiana native Shelda May Young (1848-1923) on September 30, 1869, in Alpine, Kent County, and they had at least three children: Herbert (b. 1871), Capitolia May (b. 1872) and Dayton L. (b. 1874).

By 1870 Smith was working as a farmer and living with his wife in Casnovia; next door lived one Alonzo Lewis, possibly an older brother. Smith was living in Trent, Muskegon County in December of 1877 when he became a member of the Old 3rd Michigan Infantry Association, and in 1880 was farming and living with his wife and three children in Casnovia, Muskegon County, next door to Alonzo Lewis and his family. He was residing in Trent in 1885 and probably in 1886 when he was granted a pension (no. 679303).

By 1890, Smith was residing in Casnovia. By 1900 Smith and Shelda were living at 522 Lake Avenue in Traverse City’s 4th Ward, Grand Traverse County. He was living at the Michigan soldiers’ Home in Grand Rapids, Kent County, in 1909 and in 1910.

Smith was probably living with his son Dayton at 210 E. 14th Street in Traverse City, Grand Traverse County when he died of heart disease on December 18, 1913 and was buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Traverse City: 1st add. Block 256-02-05. (Note the dates inscribed on the stone are incorrect.)


Royal P. Lewis - updated 7/9/2011

Royal P. Lewis was born on November 30, 1835, in Ohio, the son of New York native David (1802-1851) and Dolly Ellsworth (1814-1852).

Royal’s parents were quite possibly married in Truxton, New York and settled in Ohio sometime before 1832. The family eventually moved westward and between 1842 and 1846 settled in Michigan. By 1850 David had settled the family in Ionia, Ionia County where he worked as a laborer and Royal attended school with his siblings. According to family historian Ronald Lewis, after Royal’s parents died in 1851 and 1852, the children were distributed to various families in Ionia County. By 1860 Royal was a farm laborer working for and/or living with B. Chapman, a farmer in Boston, Ionia County.

Royal stood about 6’, with gray eyes, dark complexion and was 25 years old and probably still living in Ionia County when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861; three of his four brothers also enlisted in Michigan Regiments during the war: Solomon and Daniel in the 7th Michigan Infantry and Edgar in the 21st Michigan Infantry; only Solomon would survive the war. (Royal may have been related to Edwin and/or Oliver Lewis, who were also from Ionia County, although they enlisted in Company E -- the other Ionia County Company made up largely of men from Ionia and Eaton Counties.)

Royal was sick in the hospital in September of 1862, and transferred to the 6th United States cavalry on December 6, 1862, at Falmouth, Virginia. According to one source Royal was taken prisoner during action at Fairfield, Pennsylvania on July 3, 1863.

He was apparently died on January 20, 1864, possibly at home in Ionia County, or perhaps in Virginia and his body was brought home to Ionia County and was buried in Saranac cemetery: lot or grave no. 34.

No pension seems to be available.

Oliver Lewis

Oliver Lewis was born on March 3, 1834, in Greenfield, Huron, Ohio, the son of Adam A. (1790-1864) and Lucy (Coleman or Colburn, 1790-1880).

New York native Adam married Lucy Coleman (born in Connecticut) in February of 1816 in Rome, Oneida County, New York and had settled in Ohio by 1829. They left Ohio sometime after 1834 and eventually settled in western Michigan. By 1850 Oliver was living with his family on a farm in Orange, Ionia County, and in 1860 Adam and Lucy were living on a farm in Orange with their son Nelson.

He stood 5’10” with blue eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion and was 27 years old working as a farmer in Ionia County when he enlisted in Company E on May 13, 1861. (He was possibly related to Edwin Lewis also of Company E and who had also been living in Ionia County when the war broke out. He may also have been related to Royal Lewis who was also from Ionia County but who enlisted in Company D, the other Ionia County company.)

Oliver was reported absent sick in the hospital from August of 1862 through November, was back with the regiment by late May of 1863, and again absent sick in July of 1863. He had apparently returned to duty by the time he reenlisted on December 23, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Paris, Kent County, was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough, probably in Michigan, in January of 1864 and returned to the Regiment by the middle of February. He was wounded in the right shoulder on May 12, 1864 at Spotsylvania, Virginia, and admitted from the field to Mt. Pleasant general hospital in Washington, DC on May 16, with a gunshot wound to the right shoulder. (When he was admitted to the hospital in Washington, DC, he listed himself as single and his nearest relative as one Eunice Lewis in Portland, Ionia County.)

He was still hospitalized when he was transferred to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. Oliver remained absent wounded through July, and quite possibly until he was mustered out as a Corporal on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war Oliver eventually returned to Michigan.

He married Connecticut native Rebecca Mary Sherwood (1843-1917) on June 16, 1867 in Berlin (now Saranac), Ionia County, and they had at least five children: Annie Charlotte (b. 1868), Lucy (b. 1870), Oliver (b. 1875), Phoebe Ann (b. 1877), Alexander A. (b. 1880 and Lydia (b. 1884.

By 1870 Oliver was working as a farmer and living in Orange with his wife and children. Indeed, they lived in Orange for a number of years but by 1880 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife and children in Elbridge, Oceana County, and in 1888 he was living in Hesperia, Oceana County and by 1890 had moved to Holton, Muskegon County where he operated a store for some years before selling it to one Joseph Bernier. Oliver then farmed 155 acres in section 27 of Holton, and indeed he lived the remainder the his life in Holton.

He was probably still living in Holton in 1899 when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association; he was also a member of Grand Army of the Republic Dahlgren post no. 149 in Holton. In 1869 he applied for and received a pension (no. 105028).

Oliver died on March 21, 1912, presumably at his home in Holton, and was buried in Holton cemetery.

In late March of 1912 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 743725).

Henry Nash alias "John Lewis" - updated 9/8/2015

Henry Nash, alias “John Lewis,” was born in 1822 (or 1831) in New York, ad was possibly related to Amasa (born 1794 in Massachusetts died 1867 in Michigan) and Sophia.

Amasa had fought in the War of 1812 from the state of Massachusetts but at some point moved west, probably settling in Amsterdam, Montgomery County New York by 1820; he was still living in Amsterdam in 1830. Amasa eventually pushed west and in 1837 and 1838 applied for land grants in Lapeer County, Michigan. It appears that he and Sophia soon settled their family in Campbell, Ionia County, sometime before 1850 probably around present-day Clarksville where they lived the rest of their lives.

In 1850 Henry Nash was probably working as a laborer for a farmer by the name of Willson or Wilson in Lapeer, Lapeer County. (There was a John Lewis who was unable to read or write, and probably living in Mayfield, Lapeer County, Michigan, in 1850.)

Henry was probably living in Muskegon County when, for reasons unknown, he listed his name as John Lewis when he joined the 3rd Michigan Infantry in May of 1861. Henry stood 6’0” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was 30 years old and still living in Muskegon when he enlisted in Company H on May 6, 1861. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties – there was an Ezra Lewis who also enlisted from Muskegon in Company H.)

(His service record during the war used the name John Lewis, however his pension record reflected the true name of Henry Nash alias John Lewis.)

On November 7, 1861, John was hospitalized, probably in E Street hospital in Washington, DC, suffering from typhoid fever, and he remained hospitalized until January 20, 1862, when he was returned to duty. He was apparently hospitalized again and from July of 1862 through January of 1863, was on detached service as a hospital nurse, and was a nurse in a hospital in Alexandria from February through March.

He allegedly deserted from the hospital on April 28, 1863, and was subsequently dropped from the company rolls as being AWOL under General Order no. 92 (1862) of the War Department. He claimed in 1890 that in fact he had be honorably discharged in May of 1863, although the record does not presently substantiate this claim.

Henry eventually returned to Michigan and lived briefly in Pontiac, Oakland County in the summer of 1865 when, he claimed in 1890, his discharge papers were taken from his trunk. He soon returned to Lapeer County, and may have been working in the Mayfield area in 1866. By 1876, John was residing and working as a farmer in Lapeer as “Henry Nash alias John Lewis.” He was still living in Lapeer in December of 1886 when he applied for a pension; he was still in Lapeer in 1887.

Henry’s physician, Dr. William Jackson of Lapeer, testified in 1887 that he had been acquainted with Henry Nash since before the war. “Since his discharge from the service,” Dr. Jackson wrote, “he has at various times had severe attacks of eczema for which he has had medicines from me.” In June of 1869 Nash suffered from “an exacerbation of eczema and accidentally received a blow upon the head, the whole upper part of the body being in an irritated condition.” He also suffered from “an erysipelas form of disease totally interfering with active labor although he kept about most of the time. On May 19, 1878, he came to see me again suffering from another attack for which I gave him medicines. This last attack or exacerbation kept up until into June.” Dr. Jackson also claimed that Nash suffered from chronic diarrhea and continued bouts of eczema.

In 1886 Henry applied for a pension (no. 591,906) as “Henry Nash alias John Lewis,” but the certificate was never granted.

Henry was still living in Lapeer in 1888 and in Mayfield in 1890.

Henry Nash died on October 6, 1892, in Lapeer County, and was buried in Five Lakes Cemetery, Lapeer County.


Ezra W. Lewis

Ezra W. Lewis was born in 1840, possibly in New York and possibly the son of Eben (b. 1805).

Ezra was 21 years old and possibly living in Muskegon County when he enlisted in Company H on May 6, 1861; he was possibly related to John Lewis and/or Smith Lewis both of whom enlisted in Company H. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.)

Ezra was on detached service from July of 1862 through October, and may have been wounded at Fair Oaks, Virginia, on May 31, 1862. (In 1890 he claimed to have been wounded in the left knee joint by a musket ball.) Ezra was sick in the hospital from June of 1863 through December, a cook in the Regimental hospital in February and March of 1864, and was mustered out on June 20, 1864, at Detroit.

No pension seems to be available.

Following his discharge Ezra returned to western Michigan. By 1890 he was residing in Ferrysburg, Ottawa County (he may also have been living in Kent County around 1890 as well).

Ezra was possibly residing in Muskegon when he was arrested in September of 1893 in Muskegon, “charged,” wrote the Muskegon Chronicle of September 14, 1893, “with a loathsome offense.” Apparently Lewis was drunk when the unspoken crime was committed. “It seems,” the paper reported, “that Lewis was a brave soldier and once a good citizen but that drink became his bane and led to his downfall. He is the man who carried Major [William L.] Ryan off the battlefield when he was severely wounded.” Lewis pled guilty, and “Judge Dickerman gave him some sound advice and sentenced him to four months hard labor in Ionia house of corrections.”

It is unclear what the offense was, as no record of this is found in public sources available today, nor is there a prison record for Ezra in the Michigan State Archives.

Edwin R. Lewis

Edwin R. Lewis was born in 1834 in New York.

Sometime before 1860 Edwin was married to New York native Harriet (b. 1840), probably in New York. They left New York and eventually settled in western Michigan where by 1860 he was working as a lawyer and living with his wife in Lyons, Ionia County.

Edwin was 27 years old and probably living in Ionia County when he enlisted at the age of 27 in Company E on May 13, 1861. (He was possibly related to Oliver Lewis also of Company E, and who had also been living in Ionia County when the war broke out. He may also have been related to Royal Lewis who was also from Ionia County although he enlisted in Company D, the other Ionia County Company.)

Edwin was hospitalized sometime in early 1862 and was a hospital nurse in July of 1862, a hospital cook from August of 1862 through January of 1863, and serving with the Brigade wagon and ambulance trains in February, presumably as an ambulance driver. He was on detached service from March through June, and at Brigade headquarters from July of 1863 through March of 1864. He was reportedly detached “outside of the department” in April and May, and was mustered out on June 20, 1864, at Detroit.

By 1865 Edwin was probably living in New York when his son Byron was born, but eventually returned to Michigan after the war by 1870.

He was married to his second wife, Virginia native Mary E. (b. 1845), and he had at least three children: Byron (b. 1865), Henry H. (b. 1870) and Edwin L. (b. 1872).

He apparently lived for a time in Grand Rapids, Minnesota, but by 1880 he was working as a physician and living with his wife Mary and three children in Comings, Alcona County, Michigan. By 1889 he was residing in Hastings, Barry County, Michigan, although it appears that in June of 1889 he applied for a pension in Minnesota.

He was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association. In 1889 he applied for and received a pension (no. 1046558).

Edwin died on March 22, 1917, in Oklahoma and was presumably buried there.

In April of 1917 his widow was probably residing in Oklahoma when she applied for and received a pension (no. 850236).

Charles B. Lewis

Charles B. Lewis was born in 1841 in Medina, Ohio, the son of George (b. 1812) and Clarissa (b. 1814).

Connecticut native George married Ohio-born Clarissa and settled in Ohio where they resided for some years. His family moved to Michigan from Ohio sometime after 1850, and by 1860 Charles was working as an apprentice chair-maker and/or printer and attending school with his siblings and living with his family in Lansing’s First Ward where his father worked as a carpenter and joiner.

Charles stood 5’5” with gray eyes, auburn hair and a fair complexion and was 20 years old and residing in Ingham County, probably in Lansing, when he enlisted in Company G on May 13, 1861 -- he was possibly related to Albert Lewis of Company G. (Company G, formerly the “Williams’ Rifles,” was made up predominantly of men from the Lansing area.) Although Charles was officially listed as discharged on September 1, 1861, for chronic rheumatism, according to Frank Siverd of Company G, Lewis and two other men of Company G had in fact been discharged and sent home the first week of August.

In any case, Charles soon returned to Michigan where he reentered the service in Company E, Sixth Michigan cavalry on February 17, 1865, at Jackson, Jackson County for 1 year, crediting Lansing’s Fourth Ward, and was mustered the same day. He joined the Regiment on March 19, was on detached service from July through September, and was on detached service at Fort Leavenworth in Kansas when he was transferred along with the veterans and recruits to Company H, First Michigan cavalry on November 17, 1865. The First Michigan cavalry served was on duty in the District of Utah from November of 1865 until March of 1866.

Charles was reported on detached service with the First Michigan cavalry from November of 1865 through February of 1866, and honorably discharged on August 17, 1866, at Fort Leavenworth. (The regiment had mustered out on March 10, 1866, however.)

It is not known if Charles returned to Michigan after the war, although it is possible that he was living in Detroit in 1870. He was probably residing in New York in 1904 when he applied for and received a pension (1099565).

Charles died on August 21, 1924 in Brooklyn, New York.

Anson R. Lewis

Anson R. Lewis was born in 1842.

Anson was 19 years old and possibly living in Grand Rapids with his family when he enlisted with his parents’ consent in Company A on May 13, 1861. (Neither he nor his family appear in the 1860 census for Kent County.)

He was killed in action on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, and was presumably among the unknown soldiers buried at Seven Pines National Cemetery.

No pension seems to be available.

Albert B. Lewis

Albert B. Lewis was born in 1840.

Albert was 21 years old and listed his place of residence as Wayne County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company G on May 13, 1861. (He was possibly related to Charles Lewis also of Company G, and if so then he was probably born in Ohio.)

Albert was killed in action on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, and was probably interred among the unknown soldiers whose bodies were removed from Second Bull Run and reinterred in Arlington National Cemetery.