Maple Grove cemetery Fremont

3rd Michigan Infantry soldiers buried in Maple Grove Cemetery, Fremont, Michigan

There are six former members of the 3rd Michigan Infantry (first organization) buried in Maple Grove Cemetery in Fremont. One of them, Zeph Moe of Company K, is buried in the Grand Army of the Republic lot in block 4.



Zeph Moe (b. 1843) of Company K


William Paradise (1843-1875) of Company H

Shinar Preston (1839-1932) of Company K



George W. Tait (1837-1900) of Company K


William McErwan )1844-1915) of Company K


John Barnard (1836-1915) of Company H

George W. Tait - updated 12 Aug 2016

George W. Tait was born on June 23, 1837 or 1838, in Jefferson County, New York, the son of George W. and Jeanette (Kearns).

George’s parents emigrated from Scotland and arrived in America around 1833, settling eventually in New York. Around 1846 George’s family moved to Wisconsin, probably to Racine, Racine County, where his father was living in 1850; indeed, George’s parents remained in Racine for the rest of their lives.

George left Wisconsin and by 1860 had settled in western Michigan where he was working as a “log driver.” He was living in Muskegon, Muskegon County at the same boarding house with Thomas Waters, William Ryan and George Root, all three of whom would join Company H.

George stood 5’9” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was 22 years old and possibly living in Newaygo County when he enlisted in Company K on May 13, 1861. George was shot in the left hand on July 1, 1862, at Malvern Hill, Virginia, and transferred from the field to the hospital at Fortress Monroe where he arrived on July 6 aboard the steamer Knickerbocker. He was discharged for disability on October 7, 1862, at Upton’s Hill, Virginia, presumably for his wounds.

After he was discharged George eventually returned to Michigan and for some years he lived in the Muskegon area, where he engaged in farming and lumbering.

He was married twice (or perhaps three times). He married his first wife, Florence Joslin (b. 1852), on July 1, 1866, and they had at least one child, a son George (b. 1871). (Florence may have been related to George Joslin, who had also served in Company K during the war.)

By 1870 George “Tate” was working as a raftsman and living with his wife and her family in Newaygo, Newaygo County. By 1880 George was working as a farmer and living with his wife and son in Sherman, Newaygo County.

It is not known whatever became of Florence. On February 13, 1883, George married Rhoda Steel. (He may also have been married to one Sophronia and/or to “M.”)

In June of 1875 George himself purchased 60 acres of land in Sherman Township in Newaygo County. He worked that land until 1882 when he sold it to Byron Waters. Beginning in about the early 1870s George was employed as foreman of several local lumbering companies: he was three years with Kell, Wood & Co., of Muskegon and five years with O. W. Squires. In the summer of 1883, George joined with Henry Orton and took over control of the Newaygo County Poor Farm, which then consisted of some 140 acres, 96 of which were under cultivation.

He was working as a farmer in Fremont, Newaygo County in 1883 when he was drawing $6.00 per month for a wounded left hand ( pension no. 100,127); that same year he was possibly working also in Hart, Oceana County.

By 1890 he was residing in Fremont and by 1894 he was probably living in Sherman, Newaygo County (or he may have been living in Elbridge, Oceana County). Sometime in the 1880s George joined the Grand Army of the Republic Henry Dobson post 182 in Fremont; and he was also a member of the I.O.O.F. Politically he was affiliated with the National Party.

George died of heart disease at his home in Fremont on April 4, 1900, and was buried in Maple Grove cemetery in Fremont: block 2-60.


Shinar Preston - updated 12 Aug 2016

Shinar Preston was born on August 15, 1839, in Ohio, the son of William (b. 1803) and Margaret (Barnhard, b. 1818).

Vermont-born William married Ohioan Margaret probably in Ohio sometime before 1837, by which time they were living in Ohio. By 1840 William was living in Harris, Ottawa County, Ohio, and by 1850 Shiner or Shinar was attending school with his siblings and living on the family farm in Harris, Ottawa County, Ohio. About this same time William died and Margaret brought the family to western Michigan. For a time they lived in Big Prairie and Croton, Newaygo County, after which they settled in Dayton, Newaygo County. Shinar bought 120 acres of land about five of which were improved. He settled on the land right away.

In 1860 Sinar as working as a farm laborer and living with his mother and siblings in Dayton, Newaygo County. Two houses away lived John Barnhard, one of the two Barnhard brothers who would join the Third Michigan, and next door to John lived his father or grandfather Simon Barnhard.

Shinar stood 5’8” with dark eyes, black hair and a dark complexion and was a 22-year-old farmer living in Dayton when he enlisted in Company K on March 2 or 12, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered March 2 or 12. He was sick in the hospital in March of 1862, allegedly deserted on September 21 at Upton’s Hill, Virginia, and returned to the Regiment on June 23, 1863, at Gum Springs, Virginia. He was serving with the provost guard at First Division headquarters from December 29, 1863, through March of 1864, and was reportedly on detached service in May, although he was probably taken sick or perhaps wounded on May 6.

Shinar was still absent sick when he was transferred to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and he remained absent sick until he was transferred to Company B, Nineteenth Regiment Veterans’ Reserve Corps, on August 9, 1864. It is quite possible that Shinar was a guard at the confederate prison at Elmira, New York, where he was mustered out on March 12, 1865.

After his discharge Shinar returned to his mother’s home in Newaygo County, and in fact he lived the rest of his life in Newaygo County.

He married New York native Eugenia Dickinson (1846-1914) on March 17, 1872, in Dayton, and they had at least 10 children: Reno S. (b. 1866), Nellie L. (b. 1868), Lester P. (b. 1871), Nettie E. (b. 1872), Kearney N. (b. 1874), Mary or Marie O. (b. 1877), Frank C. (b. 1879) William F.; and two children died in infancy.

After Eugenia died in 1914, Shinar married his sister-in-law (Eugenia’s sister) Mrs. Hannah Brooks (1852- 1929) in 1915.

After he returned home from the war Shinar added to his land holdings and by the early 1880s had accumulated about 360 acres, 200 of which were under cultivation. He held the offices of Highway Commission Inspector and Justice of the Peace.

He was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic Henry Dobson post no. 182 in Fremont, as well as the Fremont Grange No. 49, and a Republican.

By 1880 he was working as a farmer and living in Dayton, Newaygo County, with his wife and children; next door lived one L. R. Preston, possibly a brother. He was in Fremont, Newaygo County in 1888 and in Dayton in 1890 and 1894. And by 1920 he was living with his seocnd wife Hannah in Fremont; and they were still living in Fremont in 1930.

He was living in Michigan in May of 1890 when he applied for and received a pension (no. 851385).

Shinar was a widower when he died of “senility” on November 11, 1932 at his home at 124 Elm Street in Fremont and was buried in Maple Grove cemetery, Fremont: block 4-414.



William H. Paradise - updated 12 Aug 2016

William H. Paradise was born on September 1, 1842, in Allegan, Allegan County, Michigan.

His family eventually moved north from Allegan County and had settled in the vicinity of Fremont, Newaygo County, by 1855 when William was enrolled in the school at Elm Corners (present-day Fremont).

William stood 5’9” with black eyes, dark hair and a fair complexion and was 18 years old and probably working as a laborer and still living in Newaygo County when he enlisted with the consent of the Justice of the Peace in Company H on May 6, 1861. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.)

He was reported as a pioneer (probably for the Brigade) from July of 1862 through October. William reenlisted on December 24, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Muskegon, Muskegon County, was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough, probably in Michigan, in January of 1864, and he probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February. He was a Brigade pioneer in April of 1864, probably hospitalized in May and was still absent sick when he was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry as a Corporal upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was reported absent sick through at least July of 1864, and was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

Following his release from the army William returned to Newaygo County.

He married Canadian-born (probably Quebec) Calista A. (1844-1886), and they had at least three children: Alphonse (b. 1866), Nellie (b. 1868), Willie, “our pet” (d. 1875), Sarah A. (1872-73) and Alice E. (1870-71).

By 1870 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife and children in Fremont Center, Sheridan Township, Newaygo County; he resided in Sheridan the rest of his life.

In 1871 he applied for and received pension no. 115212.

William died July 10, 1875, in Fremont, and was buried in Maple Grove cemetery, Fremont: 4-223.

In September of 1875 Calista applied for and received a pension no 172,946. By 1880 she was living in Fremont, Sheridan Township; also living with her were her two children, Alphonse and Nellie. She was still living in Fremont in 1883.


Joseph H. Moe - updated 12 Aug 2016

Joseph H. “Zeph” Moe was born in 1843, in Steuben County, New York, the son of Cragan (or Craig, b. 1805 in New York) and Elizabeth (Campbell, b. 1808 in Pennsylvania). Cragan and Elizabeth were married sometime before 1838 when their daughter Elizabeth was born. The family resided in New York before moving west. By 1850 Joseph (listed as “Zephman”) was living with his family in Orwell, Ashtabula County, Ohio, where his father worked as a carpenter. By 1860 “Zeph’s” family was living on a farm in Wright, Ottawa County.

Joseph was 18 years old and probably living in Newaygo County, Michigan, when he enlisted with the consent of the Justice of the Peace in Company K on May 13, 1861. By September of 1862 he was on detached duty as a teamster, probably serving with the Brigade wagon trains, and taken prisoner May 6, 1864, at the Wilderness, Virginia, and confined at Andersonville. He was released in February of 1865 at Goldsboro, North Carolina, and discharged on April 19, 1865, at Detroit. After the war Joseph returned to western Michigan.

He married Michigan native Clara E. Badger (b. 1854 in Branch County), on November 29, 1868, by a Justice of the Peace in Greenwood, Oceana Cpounty (his older brother Benjamin was a witness) and they had at least seven children: Erdine (b. 1871), Charles (b. 1873), Cora (1875-1883), Sidney (1876-1883) and Claude (1878-1883), Myrtle, (1882-1883), Oscar (1883). The last five all died from diptheria, Oscar in February of 1883 and the other four in June.

Joseph and Clara settled in Greenwood, Oceana County, and by 1870 he was working as a farmer living with his wife, near his parents Cragan and Elizabeth Moe and his sister Elizabeth and her husband, Hiram Place. In 1880 was working as a farmer and living with his wife and children in Greenwood (his parents were living in Greenwood with one of their other sons, Benjamin and his family).

Joseph died, sometime before early 1897, possibly in Fremont, Newaygo County, and was buried in Maple Grove cemetery, Fremont: section 4-308 (GAR lot).

In February of 1897 a pension application (no. 648054) was submitted in Michigan on behalf of Charles Moe, reportedly a minor child. The soldier’s name was reported as Josephine Moe of Company K 3rd Michigan Infantry. In any case, the certificate was never granted.


William P. McErwan - updated 12 Aug 2016

William P. McErwan, also known as “McEwan,” born December 26, 1844, in Little Falls, Herkimer County, New York, probably the son of John (b. 1795) and Sarah (b. 1819).

John was born in Scotland and immigrated to the United States where he married New York native Sarah sometime before 1834, probably in New York. They resided in New York for many years and by 1850 William was attending school with six of his older siblings and living with his family on a farm in Salisbury, Herkimer County. Sometime after 1851 his family left New York and settled in Michigan. By 1850 William was attending school with four of his siblings and living with his mother who was farming in Walker, Kent County.

He stood 5’9” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was a 19-year-old farmer still living in Walker when he enlisted in Company K on February 9, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Muskegon, Muskegon County (listing his residence as Walker), and was mustered the same day. He joined the Regiment on March 1 at Camp Bullock, Virginia, was wounded on May 12, 1864, at Spotsylvania, Virginia, and subsequently hospitalized, possibly in Alexandria, Virginia. He was still absent in the hospital when he was transferred to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and he remained absent until he was discharged on June 28, 1865, at Sickles hospital in Alexandria.

After the war William returned to western Michigan. He was married to Canadian-born Celia (b. 1846) and they had at least two children: Gerrude (b. 1867) and Maggie (b. 1869).

By 1870 William was working as a farmer and with his wife and two daughters in Wyoming, Kent County (Sarah was living just a few houses away). By 1880 he had moved to Dayton, Newaygo County and was living in Fremont, Newaygo County in 1890 and 1900. Indeed he spent the remainder of his life in Fremont.

In 1886 he applied for and received a pension (no. 693075). He was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic Dobson Post No. 182 in Fremont.

William died of nephritis in Fremont on December 25, 1915, and was buried in Maple Grove cemetery in Fremont: block 3-76.

In January of 1916 his widow was living in Michigan when she applied for and received a pension (no. 874120).


John Barnhard - updated 12 Aug 2016

John Barnhard was born November 18, 1836, in Sandusky, Ohio, the son of Jacob (b. 1809) and Sarah (Hyland, d. 1836).

After the death of his first wife, Ohio native Jacob married Ohio-born Lucinda or Lorinda Reed (b. 1820) in 1840, probably in Ohio. By the late 1840s John’s family had moved from Ohio to Chicago where they were residing between 1847 and 1848, but within two years had moved across Lake Michigan to Muskegon, Muskegon County, Michigan. According to one source, after living in Muskegon for about a year, local “Indians poled them up the Muskegon River in two canoes to Croton and while there Indian boys were his playmates and companions.” (It is possible that only John and his older brother Horatio made this emigration westward in the late 1840s followed in the mid-1850s by their parents and the rest of the family.) By 1855 the family had moved to Dayton, Newaygo County, reportedly building the first house in the Township.

In 1857 John assisted his father, brother and two uncles in cutting a road from Croton to the family farm. In the fall of 1858 John purchased from the government 80 acres in Dayton on which he built a cabin.

In 1860 John was elected Dayton Township clerk and that same year he was working as a laborer and living in Dayton, when he married his first wife, Connecticut native Maryette or Margaret Stone (1843-1884), on November 25, 1860. (She may have been a sister to Phoebe Stone who married John’s brother Horatio in 1859.) They had at least two children: Gilbert A. (b. 1868) and Herbert A. “Together,” wrote one source, “they toiled as only those pioneers did toil to build the homes that stand as monuments today to their greatness.”

John stood 5’8” with blue eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion and was 25 years old and probably still living in Dayton when he enlisted with his older brother Horatio in Company H on March 12, 1862 at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and he was mustered the same day in Grand Rapids -- their younger half-brother Simon would enlist in Company K in August. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers”, was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.)

In July of 1862 John was sick in the hospital through August, and allegedly deserted on September 21, 1862 at Upton’s Hill, Virginia (he was probably still hospitalized). In any case, he returned to the Regiment probably on October 26, 1862 at Catlett’s Station, Virginia.

John was shot in the right forearm at Spotsylvania, Virginia on May 12, 1864, and subsequently hospitalized. He was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan Infantry, upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was reported absent sick. In July he was listed as a Corporal although he still remained absent wounded. Although he was reported in January of 1865 as having died, in fact he remained hospitalized until he was discharged on account of his wounds on December 24, 1864 (or February 26, 1865), at Augur general hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

After his discharge from the army John returned to his family in Michigan and by 1870 he was working as a farmer (he owned some $4500 worth of real estate) and living with his wife and one child in Hesperia, Newaygo County. By 1880 John was working as a farmer and living with his his wife and one son in Dayton, Newaygo County.

He was living in the Fremont area in 1883 drawing $8.00 per month for a wound to the right arm (pension no. 27,554, dated February 1865), and again in 1888; he was living in Dayton, Newaygo County in 1890 and 1894.

After his wife died in 1884 John married May Thompson on May 4, 1886, and they had at least two children: Ernest and Horatio (the latter probably named after John’s brother who died during the war). They were living in Hesperia, Oceana County in 1890, but by 1911 he had returned to Fremont.

He was for many years a director in the Grangers’ Mutual Insurance Co., a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, as well as a member of Grand Army of the Republic Henry Dobson Post No. 182 in Fremont and a charter member of Hesperia Grange P. of H. no. 495.

According to one source, John “was a member of the Trustee Board of the local M.E. Church, a regular attendant of the Sunday School and preaching service and always manifested great interest in the church and welfare of the community.”

John died of myocarditis on Wednesday November 27, 1915, in possibly in either Hesperia or Dayton Township, and was buried in Maple Grove cemetery in Fremont: block B-38. “The love and respect,” wrote the Fremont Times-Indicator,

in which he was held by his neighbors and coworkers was manifested by their presence in large numbers at his funeral which was held in the little church he so much loved. The casket was covered with beautiful flowers and draped with the flag of his country. Rev. M. A. Oldt and Rev. George van Wingerden spoke words of consolation to the bereaved and the choir sang his favorite hymns. As the shades of evening were falling he was laid to rest in the cemetery at Fremont. In the passing of John Barnhard this community has sustained a loss that will long be felt. A pioneer who has lived on the farm he hewed out of the wilderness over 60 years [ago], whose life was truly crowned with success. We shall miss his cheerful presence, his wise councils, but the influence of his life will be an inspiration to those who follow after and his good works will long remain.

In 1915 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 803308).