New York

George Van Renschler - update 8/22/2016

George Van Renschler was born in 1839 in Germany, the son of Jacob (b. 1810) and Catherine (b. 1816).

 George’s family immigrated to the United States sometime before their twin sons Jacob and John were born in 1842). By 1850 George , the eldest, was attending school with his younger siblings and living with his family in Bleecker, Fulton County, New York. Catherine remarried one Jacob Miller (born in France in 1811), and by 1860 George was working as a laborer and living with family and step-family in Bleecker, Fulton County, New York. (George Vanderpool was also working and living in Bleecker in 1860; Vanderpool would serve in the Old Third with George and in fact they were good friends, with Vanderpool corresponding with Van Renschler’s sister, presumably Mary.) Also living with the Millers were twins Jacob and John “Rennselear (b. 1842 in New York), sister Mary (b. 1844 in New York, brother William (b. 1845 in New York and sister Amelia (b. 1847 in New York), as well as numerous Miller children.

By the time the war broke out George was probably living and working in Muskegon, Muskegon County. (In fact, he may have followed George Vanderpool out to western Michigan.)

He stood 5’10” with brown eyes, light hair and a fair complexion and was a 22-year-old teamster probably living in Muskegon County when he enlisted in Company H on May 6, 1861. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.

Interestingly, George did not join Company C, which was made up largely of German and dutch immigrants from the Grand Rapdis area.) He was discharged on July 29, 1861, at Arlington Heights, Virginia, for a deformity of the right foot previous to enlistment.

George was a close friend of George Vanderpool also of Company H (they were both from Fulton County, New York), and Vanderpool often wrote to Van Renschler’s sister. Van Renschler even assigned to Vanderpool the authority to receive his pay and forward it on to him after he was discharged.

It is likely that Van Renschler returned to New York following his discharge, where he reentered the service in Company E, 115th New York Infantry on August 14, 1862, at Bleecker, Fulton County, New York for 3 years. He was mustered as Corporal on August 15, taken prisoner on September 15 and paroled the following day at Harper’s Ferry, Virginia. He was promoted to First Sergeant on November 1, and wounded in action on February 20, 1864, at Olustee, Florida, returned to duty and wounded again on August 16, 1864. George was mustered out on June 17, 1865 in Raleigh, North Carolina. He apparently also served in Company F, Seventh New York cavalry.

In 1865 George applied for and received a pension for his service in the New York regiments (no. 54027).

He married Prussian Louisa (b. 1848), and they had at least one child, a son Eugene G. (b. 1868).

By 1870 George and his family were living in Johnstown, Fulton County, New York.

George died on November 30, 1870, in Gloversville, Fulton County, New York and was buried in Prospect Hill Cemetery (his brother Jacob is also buried in Prospect Hill).

In 1874 his widow Louisa, who had remarried to a Mr. Beach, was listed as the guardian for a minor child of George’s when she applied for and received a pension for a minor child (no. 445114). In 1879 she applied for and received a widow’s pension (no. 445113).

Urias Story - update 8/28/2016

Urias or Urius Story was born in April 17, 1840, in Michigan or New York, the son of Lyman (b. 1810 in Connecticut) and Emily (b. 1812 in Vermont).

By 1840 the family had left New York and moved to Michigan, probably settling in the vicinity of Dexter, Washtenaw County. The family was still living on a farm in Dexter in 1850 where Urias attended school with his siblings. Emily died sometime before 1852, possibly in Michigan, and Lyman remarried in 1852 to one Mary Stapish, an immigrant from Wurtemberg, Germany, in Lyndon, Michigan. Lyman eventually moved the family to the western part of the state. By 1860 Urius was a farm laborer working with his older brother Oliver and living on his father’s farm in Boston, Ionia County. Next door lived Calvin Wilsey and his family; Wilsey too would join the 3rd Michigan.

He was 20 years old and probably still living in Ionia County when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861. (Company D was composed in large part of men who came from western Ionia County and Eaton County.) At some point Urias was detailed as a “waiter” (probably for a group of officers). He was absent sick at Annapolis, Maryland from May through August of 1862, and allegedly deserted on September 21, 1862, at Upton’s Hill, Virginia. There is no further record, and no pension seems to be available.

In 1870 Lyman and his family were still farming in Boston, Ionia County; Lyman was still living in Ionia County in 1880.

Urias married Irish native Hannah O’Donnell (1843-1917) and they had at least five children: Ida M. (1868-1877), Horace E (1868-1956), Francis W. (1872-1873), Louis H. (b. 1876-1935) and George Lyman (b. 1879) – all born in New York.

In 1880, Urias was working as a railroad conductor and living with his wife and their children on South division Street in Buffalo, Erie County, New York, and was still working as a railroad conductor for the Buffalo R & P. R. R. in 1890. In 1910 Urias, Hannah and their three sons were living in Buffalo’s 3rd ward. In fact, Urias lived in Buffalo and/or Lackawanna his entire life.

Urias died on April 8, 1914, in Buffalo and was buried in Holy Cross Cemetery, Lackawanna.


Christopher Reglin - update 8/30/3016

Christopher Reglin was born in 1828 in Germany.

Christopher immigrated to the United States. He married New York native Roxana (b. 1826), possibly in New York, and they had at least two children: Hamlet (b. 1856) and James (b. 1862)

In 1856 they were living in Erie but eventually moved west and by 1862 the family was living in Michigan.

Christian stood 5’6” with hazel eyes, dark hair and a light complexion and was a 32-year-old farmer possibly living in Ionia County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company G on March 11 or 13, 1862, at Saranac, Ionia County for 3 years, and was mustered on March 12 or 13 at Grand Rapids. He was reported sick in the hospital in March of 1864, but eventually returned to duty and was severely wounded in the hand in early May. He was subsequently hospitalized, and probably still absent sick when he was transferred to Company A, 5th Michigan Infantry upon consolidation of the 3rd and 5th Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864.

He remained absent wounded or sick until he was discharged on either September 16, 1864, near Petersburg, Virginia, or on August 27, 1864, at Detroit for disability, possibly as a result of wounds received in action.

After he left the army Chris returned to Michigan. He was probably living in Michigan in 1864 when he applied and received a pension (no. 37452). The family eventually returned to Erie County, New York and by 1875 Christopher was working as a farmer and living with his wife and two sons in Clarence, Erie County, New York. They eventually moved back west and settled in Wisconsin. By 1890 Chris was living in Medford, Taylor County, Wisconsin.

Chris probably died around 1896, probably in Wisconsin, and is buried in Medford Cemetery, Medford, Wisconsin.

His widow was living in Wisconsin in May of 1896 when she applied for a pension (no. 633154), but the certificate was never granted.

George Howland Pennoyer - update 8/23/2016

George Howland Pennoyer was born in 1821, probably in Groton, Tompkins County, New York, the son of Justus Powers (b. 1796 and d. 1875 in New York) and Elizabeth Howland (b. 1797 and d. 1871 in New York).

In 1820 Justus was living in Groton, Tompkins County, New York.

George left New York and came to western Michigan sometime before the war broke out.

George stood 5’4” with grey eyes and hair and a ruddy complexion and was a 40-year-old farm laborer possibly living in Kent County when he enlisted in Company B on May 13, 1861. (Company B was made up largely of men from Grand Rapids, and many of whom had served in various local militia units before the war, in particular the Grand Rapids Artillery, under Captain Baker Borden, who would also command Company B.) Some years after the war, George claimed that on July 21, 1861, while the Regiment was retreating from the “Bull Run battle he lay upon the ground getting severely wet and taking a severe cold & thereby contracting rheumatism from which he has never recovered, and which disease troubled him more or less during the whole time he was in the [3rd Michigan] Regiment and also during the whole time that he was a member of the First Regiment U.S. Artillery.”

From August 17-27, 1861, George was treated for lumbago, probably in the Regimental hospital, and was sick in his quarters in September and October of 1861. He returned to the regiment in November and was present for duty through June of 1862, except when he was in the Regimental hospital from March 25 to April 3 suffering from tonsillitis.

George was reported missing in action at White Oak Swamp or Malvern Hill, Virginia on July 1, 1862, and in fact had been taken prisoner. He was confined at Richmond, Virginia, paroled at City Point, Virginia, on August 3, and was at Camp Parole, Maryland on October 23 and sent to Alexandria, Virginia in November. He reportedly suffered from scorbutus from August 6 until October 8, and from chronic diarrhea in late November. He returned to the Regiment on December 20, 1862, at Camp Pitcher, Virginia, and was suffering from intermittent fever from January 4 to 8, 1863.

George was sufficiently recovered from the fever to be transferred on February 13, 1863 to Battery H, 1st U.S. Artillery at Camp Pitcher (near Falmouth, Virginia), and was probably absent sick from April until May suffering from diarrhea. He returned to duty and “while a member of” this Regiment “while in the line of duty at camp near Fairfax Courthouse” sometime in May of 1863 “he strained himself in attempting to mount a horse” thus causing “a hernia breech, swelled testicle (or whatever it may be called) upon the left side causing great enlargement and in such shape that it almost entirely hinders [him] from doing any manual labor.” George was sent to a general hospital sometime in mid-May and was mustered out on June 11, 1864, reportedly “in the field,” but probably in Washington, DC.

After his discharge from the army George returned to Tompkins County, New York and eventually settled in Groveton where he was living when he applied for additional army bounty in 1867.

By 1870 he was living in Cortland, Cortland County, New York when he applied for a pension (no. 266540) but the certificate was never granted. By 1880 George was living in the Cortland County Poor House (or insane asylum). In June of 1883 was admitted to the county insane asylum.

George was married twice. First to Electa Cole, whom he divorced in Pennsylvania sometime before 1868, and second to Lydia (or Libbie) McNish (d. 1924) on August 8, 1868 at Waverly, New York, and they had at least one child.

George commited suicide on January 15, 1884 in “Cortlandville,” New York. According to his obituary:

George Pennoyer of South Cortland, who has been an inmate of the county Insane Asylum since June 1st, committed suicide by hanging last Saturday night. When Warden Hillsinger made his usual rounds on Saturday night, everything was quiet and Pennoyer occupied his usual quarters. On Sunday morning he was found hanging in his cell. He had tied one end of some bed clothing to the grating over the transom by his cell, and fastening the other end about his neck and so accomplished his purpose. He was sixty-four years of age and leaves a wife and one child. 

He was buried at Groton on Wednesday. He had been an inmate of the institution for a few months in the summer of 1880. George was buried with his parents in Groton Rural Cemetery, Groton: Section E, lots 7 and 10.

His widow remarried in 1885 to Alfred Seamen, but was either divorced or widowed again by 1905 when she applied for and received a pension (no. 890,995).

Louis Passineau - update 8/23/2016

Louis Passineau, alias “Louis Napoleon,” was born in 1835 in Quebec, Canada.

Louis left Canada and came to western Michigan, probably to work in the lumber mills along Lake Michigan, sometime before the war broke out.

He stood 5’8” with blue eyes, black hair and a dark complexion and was a 26-year-old laborer who could not read or write (at least in English), living in Muskegon County when he enlisted in Company H on May 6, 1861. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.)

Louis spoke very little, if any English, at least according to both Lieutenant Peter Bergevin of Company H and Mrs. Louisa Bryant, wife of the commanding officer of Company H, Captain Emery Bryant. Louisa had accompanied her husband and the regiment to Washington, DC in June of 1861. Lieutenant Bergevin described “Napoleon” as “a Canadian Frenchman of fair complexion and medium size, and spoke the English language very imperfectly but spoke the French language well, and as I spoke that language I became well acquainted with him.”

Mrs. Bryant stated some years afterward that she “had studied the language [French] and for that reason conversed with him in French and took pains to do so and became very well acquainted with him.” Mrs. Bryant further stated that when the Third Michigan left northern Virginia to join the Army of the Potomac on the “Peninsular Campaign” in the Spring of 1862, Napoleon gave her $25.00 to keep for him. “I never saw him afterwards,” she declared,

but in the year 1881 I learned from Lieutenant P. P. Bergervin late of the same Co & Regt, that in answer to a letter written by him to P. B. Fisk Esq. of Chateaugay N.Y. in reference to evidence in Napoleon’s claim for a pension in which my name was mentioned, that when Napoleon heard my name mentioned he exclaimed “I know that woman. I gave her $25 to keep for me [and] I never saw her since & never got my money.” I then wrote him through Mr. Fisk that under the circumstances I would send him the money which I afterwards did in post office money orders from the post office at Washington D.C. payable to Louis Napoleon at post office at Chateaugay N.Y. at the dates and in the amounts as follows: Sept 6th 1881 $5.00, Oct 7th 1881 $5.00, Nov 18th 1881 $5.00, March 7 1882 $10.00.

Louis was on the company rolls through October of 1861 and present for duty on December 31, 1861. He may have been sick briefly in the Regimental hospital early in 1862, but had returned to the Regiment by the end of February, and was present for duty through the end of June. He was shot in his chin and neck on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia. (Although in his pension claim declaration of 1879 he testified that during the war he suffered only from general disability sometime after August of 1862, however according to a later statement, probably in late 1882 or early 1883, he claimed that he had been wounded on May 31 at Fair Oaks. The War Department also noted that he had been wounded in May. ) He later claimed that the wound cut “the skin and flesh about two inches in length across his throat or chin under his jaw contracting the skin and muscles of his chin and front part of his neck also still remaining very tender and easily irritated and injured. . . .”

Louis was possibly suffering from general debility when he was transferred to a hospital in Washington, DC where he reportedly remained for only two days before being sent on to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania sometime in early September. He was subsequently hospitalized and was reported absent sick in the hospital from August of 1862 until he was discharged for consumption on February 9, 1863, at Fourth and George Streets hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

It is not known if Louis returned to Michigan after his discharge from the army. He listed Malone, Franklin County, New York as his mailing address on his discharge, and he was living in Chateaugay, Franklin County, New York in 1879 when he applied for a pension (no. 292,265).

He  married New York or Canadian native Lucia Patenaude (1838-1885) who was unable to read or write (at least in English), and they had at least three and possibly four children: Frank (b. 1866), Mamie (b. 1868), Chlotildis (known in the family as “Clemina”), and Daniel Bernard (1874).

By 1880 Louis was working as a laborer and living with his wife and children in Chateaugay, New York.

He resided in upstate New York working as a laborer until his death on October 17, 1883. He was buried in St. Patrick’s cemetery, Chateaugay: section 3 (his wife is buried in section 9) or 1-108 for both.

His widow also applied for a pension (no. 310513), but the certificate was never granted.

Lafayette Gleason - update 8/23/2016

Lafayette Gleason was born in 1825, in Virgil, Cortland County, New York, the son of Cephas.

By 1855 Lefayette was probably working as a servant for the Turnbull family in North Norwich, Chenango County, New York.

Lafayette was 37 years old when he enlisted on August 11, 1862, in Company K, 157th New York Infantry as a private, at Cortlandville, New York and was mustered on September 19. He was wounded on May 2, 1863, and subsequently transferred to the 7th Company, 2nd Battalion Veterans Reserve Corps (VRC) on September 1.

Lafayette stood 5’9” with gray eyes, sandy hair and a light complexion, and was a 39-year-old farmer possibly living in Girard, Branch County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Unassigned on March 25, 1864, for 3 years, crediting Girard, and was mustered on March 26 at Detroit.

In fact, Lafayette never joined the 3rd Michigan Infantry but was transferred to Company L, 3rd Michigan Cavalry at Detroit on March 25, 1864, and mustered the following day. He joined the Regiment at DeVall’s Bluff, near Little Rock, Arkansas on June 18. He was discharged for disability at Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis, Missouri on December 5, 1864.

It is not known if Lafayette ever returned to Michigan.

He reported himself as a widower when he was admitted to the New York State Soldier’s Home on February 11, 1879; he listed his nearest relative as a brother George then living in Susquehanna, Pennsylvania. He was discharged from the Home at his own request on June 20, 1879. In July of 1882 he was living in Cortlandville when he sought admission to the Cayuga County, New York poorhouse. He was subsequently readmitted to the Soldier’s Home November 12, 1882 and again discharged at his own request on December 16, 1882. On December 19, 1882 he was admitted to the National Military Home in Hampton, Virginia and discharged, at his own request on March 16, 1883.

In 1892 Lafayette was living in Cayuga County, New York; also living with him were his wife Catherine (b. 1856), Hubert (b. 1882) and Edward (b. 1889).

In February of 1864 he applied for and received a pension (no. 184182).

He probably died in New York in 1896. He was buried in Fleming Rural Cemetery, Fleming, Cayuga County, New York. His widow Catharine was living in New York in 1896 when she applied for and received a pension (no. 459673).

John A. Ellsworth - update 8/22/2016

John A. Ellsworth was born around 1833 in Delaware or Delaware County, New York, possibly the nephew of Joseph (b. 1802) and Eliza (b. 1803).

New York native married Massachusetts-born Eliza probably sometime before 1832 when their son William was born in New York. By 1850 John was working as a laborer and living with Joseph and Eliza Ellsworth and their family in Harpersfield, Delaware County, New York. (John is noted at the end of the Ellsworth family listing, even though he is the oldest “child,” leading one to conclude that he was not a son but a relative, possibly a nephew.)

John left New York and moved west, eventually settling in western Michigan. By 1860 John was working as a “month hand” and/or living with the family of Jessie Ackerman, a farmer in Moorland, Muskegon County.

John stood 5’9” with blue eyes, dark hair and a sandy complexion, and was 26 years old and still living in Muskegon County when he enlisted in Company G on May 10, 1861, at Grand Rapids. (Interestingly, John did not join the local militia company, the “Muskegon Rangers, which formed in the city in April of 1861, and which would become in large part, Company H of the Third Michigan. Rather he enlisted in Company G, which was widely known as the Lansing Company since it was composed largely of men from the Lansing area.)

John was reported as a company cook during July and August of 1862, and was injured in the back on August 29, 1862, during the battle of Second Bull Run. He was subsequently reported absent sick in the hospital from October through November of 1862, and was discharged on March 22, 1863, at Camp Pitcher, Virginia for “ascites, resulting from a blow, in the lumbar region, received . . . from a sliver of rail producing lameness and hematuria and subsequent ascites.”

After his discharge from the army John returned to Michigan where he reentered the service in Company B, Twenty-eighth Michigan infantry, probably on September 15, 1864, at Hanover, Jackson County for 3 years, crediting Leoni, Jackson County, and was mustered at Marshall, Calhoun County where the regiment was organized. He was reported as having deserted four days later on September 19 at Marshall but was subsequently on duty at the Twenty-eighth’s headquarters at New Berne, North Carolina in November and December of 1865 through April of 1866. He was mustered out of service with the regiment on June 5, 1866, at New Berne.

It is not known if John returned to Michigan after the war, although he may have lived for a time in Muskegon. In any case, he eventually returned to his home in New York.

He was probably living in New York when he married New York native Amanda (b. 1830 or 1840) and they had at least five children: M. Elmon (b. 1867), Mary (b. 1868), Dora B. (b. 1871), George (b. 1872) and John (b. 1877), all of who were born in New York.

By 1880 John was working as a stage driver and living with his wife and children in Brookfield, Madison County, New York. In 1890 he was in New York, living in Leonardsville, Madison County; he was still in New York in 1891 when he applied for and received a pension (no. 919364). By 1900 John was working as a retail butcher and living with his wife and two sons George and John in Brookfield, Madison County, New York.

John reportedly died in New York in 1906 or 1908 and was buried either in Brookfield Rural Cemetery no. 40, in Brookfield (where Joseph, Eliza and their son Lewis are buried) or in Up Hill Cemetery no. 39, also in Brookfield.

His widow was living in New York in 1906 when she applied for and received a pension (no. 622365). She was living in Brookfield, Madison County, New York in 1910; her son George was still living with her.

John J. Cutler

John I. Cutler was born May 7, 1836 in New York, son of John (1807-1892) and Christina (Spoor, 1811-1875).

John's father was, one biographer noted, "of Welsh descent and was reared to the trade of a blacksmith, and in the later years of his life was an agriculturalist,” although Bowen noted that he had “received a limited education." New York natives John and Christina were married in 1830 in Coxsackie, Greene County, New York (where Christina had been born and raised) and they settled in Coxsackie for some years. John (elder) moved the family to Delaware County, New York in about 1836 or 1837 and in 1847 settled in Chenango County, where he practiced the trade of blacksmithing as well as farming.

John (younger) was, according to one Kent County historian, “a greatly respected agriculturalist of Gaines Township” and “the fourth in a family of ten children -- two sons and eight daughters -- born to John and Christina” Cutler.

In 1853 John (elder) brought his family to Michigan and they settled in Gaines Township, Kent County, where he purchased 312 acres, “all new land, with no improvements. The first home that was erected was a log cabin on the gravel road.” His father was often sick and John (younger) was frequently required to run the family farm. Still, he

received a limited education as the schools were very scarce in the early day” and was thus “reared to the life of an agriculturalist, and with his two good hands he has helped clear up 40 acres in his native state. He began toil in life at the early age of 10 years, and all these years has been a hard worker. When he came on the farm in Gaines Township, it was heavily timbered. He has cradled many acres of grain with the four-fingered cradle at four shillings per acre, and many a day has he cut grass with the scythe. He has used the old ox-team many a year, and many a time has he driven it to Grand Rapids; and upon Canal Street he has seen the mud and mire a foot deep. He can well remember that where the Union depot now stands there were but a few small buildings. Mr. Cutler continued in charge of his father’s farm till his majority. Mr. Cutler attended one school year in Albion Seminary, and while there he was janitor and earned $90.

By 1860 John (younger) was a farmer living in Gaines.

John married New York native Harriet Elizabeth Church (1837-1934) on March 7, 1861, at Geneseo, New York, and they had at least five children: Dr. Mary M. (b. 1865), Dr. John C. (b. 1867), Frank Daniel (b. 1870), Nellie J. (Mrs. Woodworth, b. 1870), Hattie (Mrs. Wallace Richards, b. 1874) and an adopted son Preston W. (b. 1873).

John stood 5’10” with blue eyes, auburn hair and a light complexion and was 26 years old and probably still working as a farmer in Gaines when he enlisted in Company G on August 14, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Gaines, and was mustered the same day at Detroit. He joined the Regiment on September 18 at Upton’s Hill, Virginia, and on March 26, 1863, he wrote to the Eagle from Camp Pitcher, describing recent events in the Third Michigan. “We left” Maryland, Cutler Wrote,

on 26th day of last [November], forded the Potomac near Conrad's ferry, and marched westward into Virginia to Snickerville, thence south, along the east side of the Blue ridge, through Middleburg, Salem, Orleans, and Warrenton, and arrived at within 2 and a half miles of Falmouth on the 30th of Nov., where we still remain. -- We were not certain, at that time, that this camp would be our home for the winter; but engaged energetically in the work of building log-shanties, of a size suited to the accommodation of 4 soldiers each. We had hardly finished this enterprise before, at an early hour on the morning of Dec. 10th, our ideas were startled by heavy booming of cannon, and the familiar sound ‘Fall in!’ -- We were soon in line and marching toward the battle field. On nearing the river, we halted and waited orders. We crossed the Rappahannock on the 13th, at 10 AM were ordered to the front at half-past 11, to support a battery, and held an important position during that battle, where the shot and shell fell thick and fast around us; but Providence smiled upon us, and we returned to our old camp, on the 16th, with a loss of only 4 or 5 slightly wounded, and one deserted [actually two, Darwin Hendershot and William Pollock]. We broke camp again on the 20th day of [January], marched up the river, about 5 or 6 miles, and bivouacked for the night, with the supposition that we would cross the river at daylight the next morning and give battle to the enemy. We had scarcely made ourselves comfortable for the night before the rain commenced falling, and continued 48 hours, which made the roads impassable with artillery or pontoons; so we about-faced and marched back to our old camp again, on the 23rd, where we are likely to remain until settled weather this spring. Then the scenes of camp life will probably be changed to scenes of bloodshed and sorrow. Our camp is on a pleasant side hill, where wood was and water is handy. 4 months ago our campground was covered with a dense forest; now our firewood consists of short stumps cut close to the ground, and carried nearly half a mile. The army has consumed the wood from nearly a 100 square miles of Virginia timber-land. We have an abundance of food and clothing, and are generally well supplied with green-backs. The boys are anxious to visit their [Michigan] homes, see the fair faces and hear the sweet voices of their much beloved wives, children and sweethearts, but say they don't ask any odds of them in the line of cooking. Large details are frequently made from this dept. of the army, of which the 3rd form a part, for the purpose of building corduroy roads to accommodate supply trains. Our morning sick report is comparatively small. The boys are in fine spirits, and are justly proud of their noble commander, B.R.P. [Byron R. Pierce] The weather is so changeable in this climate that it is impossible to move an army successfully in winter. 3 feet of snow has fallen, but not more than 10 inches at any one time. -- Snow and rain storms have occurred alternately, so as to keep the roads in a horrible condition most of the time. Judging by the winter, we anticipate a favorable spring. Soldiers, generally, favor the conscription act, and think it the only tight way to put down the rebellion. If I am rightly informed, the Regiment numbers nearly 300 present for duty. Several have been discharged lately for disability from wounds.

The same issue of the Eagle reprinted Cutler’s addendum of March 30, 1863.

Before I had sufficient time to close and mail this article, on the morning of the 27th, orders came to fall in with blankets and 3 days rations, to go on outpost picket duty. We marched about 3 miles up the Rappahannock from Fredericksburg, and had the pleasure of picketing on the bank of the river within plain sight of the rebels, who were stationed on the opposite bank. They frequently saluted us, and indicated their friendship in various ways. One in particular, while the picket guard was looking at us, stepped back several paces and imitated a man swimming -- as much as to say, ‘If I had liberty I would soon be with you.’ The same day a Lieutenant and 3 noncoms are said to have come over to our lines, further up the river, and given themselves up, stating that they had fished for a living as long as they were going to. During the 3 days that our regt. stayed on picket, the rebels might be seen fishing in various places along the opposite bank, at all times of the day, some with hook and line, and some with a small dip net; but, in either case, they were poorly paid for their trouble. After watching them for a long time, one could not but come to the conclusion that they had not cast their net on the right side of the ship. But the time is near at hand when fishing will be played out, and our boys will play them a game at ball (and perhaps bawl). 2 powerful armies are here, separated by a stream of water not half so large as the Grand River; and it is my opinion that only a few days separate both from one of the bloodiest battles of the war, unless the rebels skedaddle immediately. We are waiting only for a few days of good weather to show the world that the army of the Potomac is not demoralized; that it is our turn to whip this time; that Gen. Hooker is the man to lead us on from victory to victory; and that, although I, and perhaps a 100,000 more, may fall in battle, this uncalled for and unjust rebellion must and will be swept from the face of the earth, and the stars and stripes again float unmolested "from the flagstaff of every city town and fortress" from the Atlantic to the Pacific, and from the lakes to the Gulf. Then, mothers, do not mourn as your brave sons are marching boldly to the field of carnage. If they fall, they fall in defence of that which Heaven ordained for them. If they return, they will return prepared to live better lives in a better country. Beloved wives and little ones, while we regret that many of you are to become widows and orphans by this war, and left to select your own pathway among cowards and traitors, we rejoice that it is your privilege to meet us in that bright home above, where goodness is forever in glory, and wars will never come.

In May of 1863 John was hospitalized with a gunshot wound to the left chest, possibly received on May 3 at Chancellorsville, Virginia, and he remained in the hospital through July.
It appears that John had returned to the regiment by the time it was sent north to New York to provide security for the upcoming draft in that state. The regiment spent nearly two weeks in Troy, New York and returned to the Army of the Potomac in early September.

On September 16, from the regiment’s quarters in Washington, John wrote an open letter to the “Citizens of Troy”

we have not forgotten you. The reception we me with in our arrival at your city, the kind treatment shown, and the many little presents bestowed upon us as tokens of your friendship to and sympathies with us as defenders of our country, the many kind words spoken while we were with you, and so clear a manifestation of your friendship on the evening of our departure, all contribute largely in making you seem near and dear to every soldier in the regiment. Be assured, dear friends, that those invitations to your houses, those various kinds of delicious fruit, and other tokens brought to us in camp, and more especially those waving handkerchiefs and exclamations of “Good-bye”, as the steamer bore us onward to the seat of war, were all big and expressive words to the soldier. Not only the pleasant time generally we had while with you, but yourselves individually and collectively will live in our minds a whole lifetime. When we left the field, we had a faint hope of a visit down East; we more than met our expectations. We came cheerfully to your city, and you are well aware we came cheerfully away; we are now going cheerfully to the field of battle; and, led by our noble commander, I trust we will, if need be, go cheerfully to our graves in defense of our much afflicted country. We are now at the city of Washington, and have orders to start to the front at daylight tomorrow morning. Quite a change! We will no more be seen tripping down the sidewalk to Carpenter’s hotel for breakfast, but may be seen proceeding from our lowly beds on cold damp ground – some starting for the little running brook with canteens for water, and others breaking dry branches from the trees, whittling kindlings, building fire, filling cups, packing up our houses (little tents), etc. The coffee is soon cooked; then, of course, breakfast is ready. We then soon find ourselves seated upon our beds (the ground), where we dispose of our ration of hard-tack, pork and coffee. By this time, the bugle will call us to attention; we are soon in line, and forward march to no one knows where. Don’t you believe we’ll think of Troy? Most assuredly we will; also, of our far-off Western homes. The army of the Potomac is again on the move. There have been some skirmishes recently, which have been favorable to our cause, all preparatory to another terrible battle, which we hope and trust will result in a total rout of Lee’s army. To you that oppose the Administration and the Union, I would say oppose it no more; it only beckons the South on to a more terrible destruction, while at the same time it not only increases out already immense expenditures, but subjects you to the fate of those who are now facing our giant foe. For the time will come “when the stars and stripes will again float from the flag-staff of every city, town and fortress” from the Atlantic to the Pacific and from the lakes to the gulf. If three hundred thousand conscripts and a million of treasure per day won’t accomplish the object, more will be used. The Union will be restored. Notwithstanding there is a lack of time, we would not fail to speak a word to you, dear children (for I am a great lover of children). You still live in our memories, with increasing interest, as we go forth to battle with our country’s foes, not less for yourselves than for us. My little friends! Have you ever thought of the fact that those who are now but children will soon have the rule of Government? Our fathers are one after another dropping away, and soon you will arrive at the period of manhood and must occupy some position in life. What shall yours be? Now is the time to determine. Let is set our mark in the world and never yield to discouragement. May it be our first and greatest object to accomplish the high and nobler purpose for which we were created – that we may pass off this preparatory state of existence with a knowledge that we have not lived in vain, and that the world may acknowledge itself better for our having lived in it. If my life should be spared and I again permitted to see you somewhere in the wide world, may it be my greatest delight to learn that you are good and useful men and women. Hoping that none of our soldier boys were so un kind as to leave a stain upon our character in your city, and that I may hear from many of you again, I subscribe myself, yours very respectfully, Private J. I. Cutler, Company G, Third Michigan.

By December John was reported as a guard at the First Division headquarters through January of 1864, in February he was detailed to Corps headquarters, and in March was on detached service at Division headquarters. He soon rejoined the Regiment and was transferred to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864.

John was shot in the left side of his chest on June 16, near Petersburg, Virginia, the “ball entering at junction of fifth rib with sternum, fracturing it at that point, passing outwards and emerging about an inch below the nipple.” He was admitted on June 20 to the hospital at City Point, Virginia. He was subsequently admitted to Lovell hospital in Portsmouth Grove, Rhode Island on June 26 and transferred on September 2 to and admitted on September 6 to Skellary’s (?) hospital in Detroit. On November 25 he was admitted to Harper Hospital in Detroit where he remained until he was discharged at Detroit on either March 21 or April 27, 1865, for disabilities resulting from his wounds.

John returned to his home in Gaines and by 1870 he was working as a farmer (he owned some $7000 worth of real estate and another $2000 of personal property) and was living with his wife and three children next door to his parents (his father owned some $6000 worth of real estate) in Gaines.

According to local historian Bowen, John was a supporter of “the republican policy, and the first presidential vote he cast was for Lincoln,” but during his later years he tended toward a “a strong prohibition principle” and in fact “he has been selected by the prohibition party to represent them in County and state conventions, and always received the nominations from his party for important positions in the Township, and was also nominated for County treasurer by the same party. He takes high ground as to the public schools, and he believes in the best of teachers which can be procured, and in keeping up the best improvements to advance the children to a higher and better education and place in life. He is one of the heavy taxpayers of the Township, and a man who has aimed to let nothing impede the progress of improvement and advancement.”

John and his wife were “ardent church members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and Mr. Cutler has aided in the erection of 6 different churches in the community, which shows that he has been generous,” and they regularly attended the Methodist church on Division Street in Grand Rapids. Bowen added that “The estate of Mr. Cutler comprises 486 acres in Gaines and Byron Townships. The beautiful brick mansion is of three stories and basement under the entire residence, with stone base. The elegant home is finely finished in hard wood, is heated by furnace, and fitted with electric bells and gas. The residence is a model of a beautiful home, built in the Romanesque style of architecture. It was erected in 1901, and most of the natural woods were taken from the Cutler estate. Mr. Cutler is a gentleman of large executive ability and business experience, and the family is one of the most highly respected in the Township.”

John was living in Gaines in 1870, working on his farm, and in Fisher Station or Dutton (both in Gaines Township) in 1883 and 1888 and in Gaines, Kent County in 1890, but generally he resided in or near Gaines most of his postwar life. Cutlerville in Gaines Township, was named after his father who was one of the pioneer settlers of that part of the County, and, according to Louise Downs, “they were the largest land owners in that area.” Downs added that “In 1910 Pine Rest Christian hospital was established and had its beginnings in the Cutler mansion built" in 1891.”

John was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association and he received pension no. 123,942, drawing $4.00 in 1883.

John fell ill in 1911, lapsed into a coma and died on March 3, 1911, presumably at home in Gaines. He was buried in Blain cemetery, Kent County.

His widow applied for and received a pension (no. 724,818).

Calvin Curler

Calvin Curler was born May 18, 1839, in Watertown, Jefferson County, New York.

Sometime before the war broke out Calvin left New York and moved westward, eventually settling in western Michigan.

He stood 6’2” with black eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion, and was a 22-year-old laborer possibly living in Muskegon County when he enlisted in Company H on May 13, 1861 along with his younger brother Ira. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers”, was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.)

Calvin contracted rheumatism in August of 1861, but eventually recovered and returned to duty, although it appears that he spent quite a bit of time in the hospital.

George Vanderpool of Company H said after the war that about the time of first Bull Run he didn't “think [Calvin] was on duty much but was doctoring a good deal. He seemed to be a good faithful fellow enough but gave out easily. I remember a couple of times we started out on picket post and he had to be excused. I think he was excused because he had the rheumatism . . . but it may have been because he was weak from disease. He was not a particular chum of mine." Captain Thomas Waters, also a former member of Company H, remembered in 1899 that Curler “was sick a good deal in [the] fall of 61 at Arlington, but I really can’t say what the trouble was.”And another former Third Michigan veteran, Miles Chubb testified in 1899 that Calvin in fact "was not a tough soldier, that "he was a loose-join[t]ed tall fellow, who could not stand much service.”

In any case, Calvin was shot in the left arm and side on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, and admitted to the hospital at Judiciary Square in Washington, DC, where he was reported to be “doing well” by early July. Calvin remained sick in the hospital in August of 1862, and was discharged on account of his wounds on October 29, 1862, at Upton Hill, Virginia.

After his discharge from the army Calvin eventually returned to Michigan. He was married to Ohio native Almina or Almira McConnell (b. 1842), possibly in Michigan, and they had at least four children: Margaret (b. 1864), Mary (1866-1917), James (b. 1868) and Louisa (b. 1876). (One of his daughters would become Mrs. A. L. Mugridge.)

Calvin and his wife were living in Michigan in 1864 and by 1870 Calvin was working as a farmer (he owned some $3000 worth of real estate) and was living with his wife and three children in Wales, St. Clair County. He was still working as a farmer and living with his family in Wales in 1880; that same year their daughter Margaret or “Maggie” was also listed living with her grandfather James McConnell and attending school in St. Clair, St. Clair County.

Calvin was living in St. Clair, St. Clair County in 1883, in Smith Creek, St. Clair County in 1888 and possibly in Memphis, Tennessee sometime in the late 1880s. By 1894 he was living in Wales (probably Smith Creek), St. Clair County, in Port Huron in 1895 when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, back in Smith Creek in 1904, and in Wales by 1906.

He was a member of Grand Army of the Republic Miles Post No. 113 in St. Clair, and he received pension no. 29,260, dated May of 1864, drawing $6.00 in 1883, $17.00 in 1906, and $90.00 in 1929.

Calvin died a widower on June 30, 1927, at Port Huron, St. Clair County, and was buried in Lakeside cemetery: section I, in Port Huron (also buried with him are his daughter Mary and one Sarah Jane Curler, who died in 1927 as well.)

William H. Cummings

William H. Cummings was born 1816 in Cayuga, New York.

There was a William Cummings living in Mentz, Cayuga County in 1830 and 1840 and one Catharine Cummings living in Mentz in 1850. We do know that William left New York state and by 1860 had settled in western Michigan where he was a day laborer working for William Jones’ lumber company in Maple Island, Dalton Township, Muskegon County.

William stood 5’8” with brown eyes, black hair and a dark complexion, and was 45 years old and still living in Muskegon County when he enlisted in Company H on May 13, 1861. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers”, was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.)

William was admitted to the regimental hospital on January 1, 1863, suffering from acute diarrhea and returned to duty on January 31. He returned to the regimental hospital on February 19, with diarrhea and returned to the company February 25. He was absent sick in the Division hospital in April of 1863, in June he was a guard at Corps headquarters, and in July was guarding supply wagons.

In September of 1863 he was again hospitalized, but had probably returned to duty when he reenlisted on December 24, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Muskegon. He was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864 and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February.

William was absent sick in the hospital in March of 1864, but eventually returned to duty and was promoted to Corporal. He was wounded slightly in the head on May 5, 1864, during the Wilderness campaign. He was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was hospitalized at Little York hospital in Pennsylvania, and Grace hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, and on March 17, 1865, was transferred to Company A, Twenty-second Veterans’ Reserve Corps, at Baltimore, Maryland. He was listed as “deserter” as of July 15, 1865 at Camp Dennison, Ohio. Other records note that he was mustered out of service on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

William eventually returned to Michigan, and for some years lived in Muskegon, Muskegon County working as an engineer.

In 1879 William applied for and received a pension (no. 546829).

William may have been married.

By 1880 William was probably a widower working as a farmer and boarding in Ottawa, LaSalle County, Illinois. In any case, William was living in LaSalle County, Illinois, when he entered the Illinois Soldiers’ Home in Quincy, Adams County, on November 29, 1887, and by 1888 he was residing in Adams’ County, Illinois, probably the Soldiers’ Home. He was living still living at the Illinois Home in December of 1892.

William was probably a widower and possibly died in the Illinois Home in 1902.

Oliver M. Culver

Oliver M. Culver was born in 1842 in New York.

Oliver left New York state and moved west, eventually settling in western Michigan with his family, probably in the Grand Rapids area, sometime in the late 1850s.

He was possibly the same Oliver Culver who was arrested in Grand Rapids in the summer of 1859, charged with theft. On July 26, 1859, the Grand Rapids Enquirer reported that one “Oliver Culver, a young lad, was brought up, charged with stealing a pair of boots from a man in Alpine. Plead guilty, and was sentenced to pay a fine, or 40 days in County jail. Funds being scarce with him, he choose [sic] the latter, and was committed.”

In any case, by 1860 Oliver was probably working as an apprentice painter in Grand Rapids’ Second Ward.

Oliver was 19 years old and still living in Kent County when he enlisted with his parents’ consent as Eighth Corporal in Company K on May 13, 1861. (He was possibly related to George Culver also of Company K and/or Noah Culver of Company I.) Oliver was reported AWOL in August of 1862, but he eventually returned to the Regiment.

He was shot in the head and killed on July 2, 1863, while the regiment was engaged in the Peach Orchard, during the second day of the battle of Gettysburg.

He was buried in the Michigan plot, National Cemetery at Gettysburg: section B, grave 18 .

No pension seems to be available.

Noah Culver Jr.

Noah Culver Jr. was born 1820 in Little Valley, Cattaraugus County, New York, the son of Noah Sr. (b. 1779) and Sarah (Fenn, b. 1778).

Connecticut natives Noah and Sarah were married in Connecticut sometime before 1807. A veteran of the War of 1812, Noah Sr. eventually settled his family in Little Valley, Cattaraugus County, New York around 1817. Noah Jr. left New York State and moved west, eventually settling in western Michigan, and by 1860 Noah was a farmer living with and/or working for Oscar Sherburn (who would also enlist in Company I), a farmer in Blendon, Ottawa County.

Noah Jr. stood 5’10” with hazel eyes, brown hair and a light complexion, and was 41 years old and still living in Blendon when he enlisted as First Sergeant in Company I on June 10, 1861. (Company I was made up largely of men from Ottawa County, particularly from the eastern side of the County.) He was possibly related to George and/or Oliver Culver, both of Company K. Noah was reported sick in the hospital from August of 1862 through December, and discharged on January 12, 1863, at York, Pennsylvania, suffering from chronic nephritis and rheumatism.

It is not known if Noah ever returned to Michigan. He was probably living in Missouri Valley, Missouri, sometime in the 1880s when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association. He eventually returned to his home in Cattaraugus County, New York.

In July of 1864 he applied for a pension (application no. 48260), but the certificate was apparently never granted.

He was reportedly buried in Greenwood cemetery in Cattaraugus County, New York, but subsequently reinterred in Steamburg cemetery, Coldspring, Cattaraugus County, New York.

William Edward Creary

William Edward Creary, also known as “Crary” and “Crarey”, was born October 20, 1842, in New York.

William left New York before the war broke out and eventually settled in Michigan.

He was 18 years old when he enlisted in Company F on May 13, 1861. William was listed on picket duty as of October 31, 1861. He was reported as a clerk at Brigade headquarters from December of 1862 through July of 1863. In August he was a clerk at the convalescent camp in Alexandria, Virginia, where he remained through September. It appears that William may have suffered from a chronic ailment -- or perhaps he had been wounded.

He was transferred to the Seventy-third company, Second Battalion, Veterans’ Reserve Corps, on October 24, 1863, listing his residence as Ludington, Mason County, and was in the Seventy-eighth company, Second Battalion on June 13, 1864. (The VRC was made up of men who while ambulatory were generally incapable of performing regular military tasks due to having suffered debilitating wounds and/or diseases and were assigned to garrison the many supply depots, draft rendezvous, camps, forts, prisons, etc. scattered throughout the northern cities, thus freeing able-bodied men for regular military duty.) He worked as a clerk in the headquarters for the Seventy-eight Company and/or Second Battalion, and in November and December he was listed as present although absent sick at Depot Camp, Company I, Nineteenth Invalid Corps. In February of 1864 he was reported as deserted and in mid-June as working as a clerk in the Provost Marshal General’s office. He was still detached from the Nineteenth VRC to the Provost Marshal General’s office in August and indeed through October of 1865 when he was taken up on the rolls of the Thirty-ninth Company, Second Battalion VRC. By December of 1865 he was detached to the Quartermaster General’s office.

He married Annie Elizabeth Clark (d. 1917), on July 10, 1865 or 1866, in Washington, DC, and they had at least three children: Henry, William and Catharine. (She was probably his second wife.)

William was discharged, presumably from the VRC, on August 23, 1866. He apparently joined the regular army and was appointed as Major and Paymaster on June 23, 1879, and retired on December 22, 1892.

He was on duty at Washington, DC, from July 1 to September 4, 1879, at Fort Lowell, Arizona, to April 19, 1880; at Tucson, Arizona, to May 5, 1880.

The particulars remain unknown but apparently William was under arrest undergoing trial and awaiting sentence at Tucson to November 27, 1880, when, by General Court Martial Order No. 60, AGO, on November 17, 1880, he was sentenced to suspension from rank, forfeiture of half pay for the period of one year, to November 27, 1881.

Nevertheless, he was on duty at Tucson, to April 30, 1883, at San Francisco, to October 10, 1885, and at Cheyenne Depot, Wyoming to March 8, 1887. He was reportedly sick at Fort McKinney, Wyoming, while absent on pay tour, from September 25 to October 13, 1886, and at Cheyenne Depot to February 28, 1887. He was on leave to June 3, 1887, and on duty at Omaha, Nebraska to October 1, 1888. He was at Salt lake City, Utah, to June 25, 1891 and at San Antonio, Texas to November 15, 1892, “when having been examined by a Retiring Board and found incapacitated he was ordered home.”

He was awaiting orders to December 3, 1892 and on sick leave to December 22, when he was officially retired.

According to the Dr. Edward Moseley, the surgeon who examined William for his board review, he found William

suffering from the effects of a partial dislocation of the left elbow joint received at the battle of Gettysburg. The head f the radius has been forced entirely away from its articulation and has formed an anchylosis in such a position that the power of supination is entirely lost, the fore-arm and hand are fixed in a prone position and can be used in no other way. This injury is permanent and disables this arm to the extent of one-half for all purposes of active use in work. His right hand is deformed by the loss of the second and third joints of the fore finger from an amputation required in consequence of gangrene and necrosis of the bones of the ginger following an injury while on a pay trip on the frontier several years ago. The stump of his finger is contracted, deficient in circulation and innervation, and in consequence painfully affected by cold and accidental injuries. His capacity to write, handle money or such other use, is most impaired. In my opinion, this officer . . . is unfit for active service as a Paymaster in the Army.

Although his residence was given as 223 Indiana Avenue, Washington, DC, William was in Jordan Hot Springs, Frederick County, Virginia, when he died on July 22, 1899. He was buried in Arlington National Cemetery on August 2, 1899: lot 448.

According to his widow, when William died “she was on a visit to the Philippine Islands accompanied by her daughter Katharine Caldwell Creary, and that at that time her two sons Henry Clark Creary and Wm. Ferry Creary were stationed at [the] Islands in the service of the United States.” Henry “was a paymaster’s clerk to Major Sherry” and William “was a 1st Lt. Of the 12th U.S. Inftry.” She added that her husband William had died “at Jordan Hot Springs, Virginia.”

Although a resident of Washington, DC, Annie was living in California in November of 1899 when she applied for and received a pension (no. 553174), drawing $20 per month by 1917 when she living at 181 Infantry Terrace, the Presidio, San Francisco. She was living at Fort Douglas, Salt Lake County, Utah in 1901, but was back in San Francisco by 1917. She was buried in San Francisco National cemetery: Officers 6, plot 8.

Ira M. D. Crane

Ira M. D. Crane was born around 1837 in Tyre, Seneca County, New York, the son of Stephen B. (b. 1795) and Eunice (b. 1797).

New York native Stephen married Massachusetts-born Eunice and eventually settled in New York where they were living in 1833. Stephen eventually took his family and moved westward, settling in western Michigan by 1850 when Ira was living with his family on a farm in Kalamazoo, Kalamazoo County. In 1860 Ira was still living with his family in Kalamazoo, Kalamazoo County, where he was working as a printer.

Ira stood 5’7” with gray eyes, dark hair and a light complexion and was 24 years old and still living in Kalamazoo County when he enlisted in Company G on May 13, 1861. Ira was present for duty from January of 1862 through July, and although he had been wounded on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, he soon returned to camp and was back on duty in early June. He was wounded slightly in the leg on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, and subsequently hospitalized at Washington Street hospital in Alexandria where, by the second week of September he was reported to be “doing well.”

Ira remained absent sick in the hospital from his wounds through February of 1863, was present for duty in March and April, and promoted to Corporal on March 20, 1863. He was wounded a third time, on May 3, 1863 at Chancellorsville, Virginia, by a gunshot to the left hip, and admitted on May 9 to Armory Square hospital, Washington, DC. He also received the Kearny Cross for his participation in the battle of Chancellorsville.

Ira was furloughed from the hospital on January 29, 1864, and returned from furlough on March 31. He remained hospitalized until he was discharged as a Corporal on July 1, 1864, at Armory Square hospital, for disability caused by “partial anchylosis of left hip joint from gunshot wound”.

Ira returned to Michigan and married Maryland native Anna E. (b. 1845); they had at least one child: Walter (b. 1867).

By 1870 Ira was working as a farmer and living with his wife in Allegan, Allegan County. By 1880 Ira was working as a farmer and living with his wife and son in Trowbridge, Allegan County. He was still living in Allegan, Allegan County in 1883, and in 1884 when he attended the Sixth Annual Reunion of the Soldiers and Sailors, at Battle Creek, Calhoun County.

He was living in Owosso, Shiawassee County in 1888, and by 1890 he was residing in Grand Rapids. He may have been the same Ira B. Crane who was working and rooming at 43 Monroe Street in Grand Rapids in 1889 and working as an agent for F. J. Lamb & Co. and rooming at 146 S. Jefferson in Grand Rapids the following year.

Ira was probably a member of Grand Army of the Republic Bassett Post No. 56 in Allegan. In 1864 he applied for and received a pension (no. 33,801), drawing $6.00 per month.

Ira died on January 14, 1917, in Cleveland, Ohio, and was presumably buried there.

Gilbert J. Crane

Gilbert J. Crane was born in 1824 in Palmer, New York.

Gilbert was married to New Jersey native Jane (b. 1836) and they had at least three children: Elitha (b. 1854), John (b. 1857) and Frances (b. 1860).

Gilbert settled his family in Michigan sometime before 1854 and by 1860 he was working as a farmer (he owned some $700 worth of real estate) and living with his wife and children in Otisco, Ionia County. He may have been living in Berlin, Ionia County in 1864.

He stood 5’5” with black eyes, brown hair and a light complexion when he enlisted in Company C at Grand Rapids, Kent County, on January 27, 1864, for three years, and was mustered in the same day. He was not taken up on the company rolls and there is no further record. (There is only a muster and descriptive roll card found in the military service record files for the Third Michigan infantry.)

In fact he actually joined Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry, and was discharged for disability on June 7, 1865 (curiously, the same day as George Bracy).

Gilbert returned to Michigan after the war. In 1882 he was living in Michigan when he applied for and received a pension (nos. 448188 and 744805).

Frederick Norman Crandall

Frederick Norman Crandall, alias “Ormond F. Crandall”, was born about 1840 in Franklin County, New York.

Frederick left New York and moved westward, eventually settling in western Michigan by the time the war broke out.

Frederick stood 5’11” with gray eyes, brown hair and a light complexion, and was a 21-year-old carpenter probably living in Kent County when he enlisted in Company A on May 13, 1861. (Company A was made up largely of men from Grand Rapids, and many of whom had served in various local militia units before the war, specifically the Valley City Guards, or VCG, under the command of Captain Samuel Judd, who would also command Company A.) He was absent sick in the hospital from August of 1862 through October, and was discharged on November 10, 1862 at Chesapeake general hospital, Fortress Monroe, Virginia, for “hemorrhoids of long standing and prolapsus of the rectum.”

It is not known if Frederick ever returned to Michigan.

He was married to Melvina.

He eventually settled in Colorado where he was living in 1890 when he applied for and received a pension (no. 1044893).

His widow was still living in Colorado in 1907 (?) when she applied for and received a pension (no. 511237).

William L. Coughtry

William L. Coughtry, also known as “Coftry”, was born 1838 in Albany, Albany County, New York.

William left New York and moved west, eventually settling in western Michigan by the time the war broke out.

He was married to Rachel E. and they had at least one child.

William stood 5’7” with gray eyes, dark hair and a light complexion, and was a 23-year-old cigar-maker probably living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company B on May 13, 1861. (Company B was made up largely of men from Grand Rapids, and many of who had served in various local militia units before the war, in particular the Grand Rapids Artillery, under Captain Baker Borden, who would also command Company B.) He was absent sick in the hospital in July of 1862, and was a Sergeant and the recipient of the Kearny Cross for his participation in the action at Chancellorsville, Virginia on May 3, 1863, during which he may have been wounded.

In the spring of 1863 he was a witness for the prosecution in the court martial of Lieutenant James Bennett of Company B, on May 25, 1863, when Coughtry was First Sergeant of the company.

William was wounded in the right leg on July 2, 1863, in the Peach Orchard during the battle of Gettysburg, and was admitted probably first in the general hospital, West’s Building, Baltimore, Maryland, and then on July 10 to Satterlee’s hospital in West Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was reported “the missile was a fragment of shell which struck the outside of right thigh in the upper third making a contused wound.” It was also noted that his health was good and the “wound doing well at time of admission.”

Indeed William did recover and returned to duty on August 6. He reenlisted on December 23, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Grand Rapids, although his discharge paper notes that he was transferred to the Veterans’ Reserve Corps on that same day. (The VRC was made up of men who while ambulatory were generally incapable of performing regular military tasks due to having suffered debilitating wounds and/or diseases and were assigned to garrison the many supply depots, draft rendezvous, camps, forts, prisons, etc. scattered throughout the northern cities, thus freeing able-bodied men for regular military duty.) He was possibly absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864 and he probably returned to duty (to the VRC) on or about the first of February.

On April 29, 1864, William received permission from the Supervisory committee for Recruiting Colored Regiments in Philadelphia to enter the Free Military School in Philadelphia, and on May 2, 1864, he applied to appear before the board of examiners for admission to the Free Military School. He informed Captain Alfred Pew, then commanding Company B, Third Michigan, that he had “received permission to enter the free military school at Philadelphia,” and his request was approved on May 3 by Lieutenant Colonel Moses Houghton, then commanding the Third Michigan, as well as by the Brigade commander.

However, before he was transferred, William was wounded on May 6, 1864, during the Wilderness campaign, and he subsequently died of his wounds in a field hospital on May 10, 1864. He was presumably among the unknown soldiers buried in the Wilderness.

In June of 1864 his widow was quite probably living in Albany, New York when she applied for and received a pension (no. 68500). She eventually remarried to a Mr. McCorman and in 1869 applied on behalf of a minor child (no. 730695).

Zara Lucerne Cotton - updated 2/28/09

Zara Lucerne Cotton was born May 9, 1834, in either Cortland, Cortland County or Fayetteville, Onondaga County, New York, the son of Theodore (1802-1879) and May (Lewis, b. 1805) or Susannah.

New York natives Theodore and May were married in 1823 in Cortland, New York.

While the specifics remain unclear, apparently Zara, barely fourteen years old, enlisted in the “District of Columbia and Maryland Volunteers” on June 5 or 6, 1848, but was soon discharged on June 27 at Fort McHenry, Maryland -- possibly as a consequence of his youth.

In any case, his father eventually moved the family from New York State to Michigan, eventually settling in Ionia County. In fact Gilbert Cotton, Zara’s older brother, had been living in Michigan since at least 1850. Zara may have served as Third Sergeant of the Boston (Ionia County) Light Guards, a West Ionia County militia company that would serve as the nucleus for Company D, Third Michigan Infantry in 1861. His older brother Gilbert had himself been involved with the Boston Light Guard, although he resigned his rank of Lieutenant from the Guards at about the time war broke out.

In late 1859 or early 1860 Zara married Ohio native Esther Ann Rodgers (b. 1842).

They may have lived briefly in Saranac, Ionia County, with Esther’s family (Eli and Sally Rodgers). By 1860 Zara was working as a cabinet-maker and living with his new wife together with his father Theodore, who was working as a cabinet-maker, in Boston, Ionia County; next door lived Zara’s older brother Gilbert and his family; Gilbert too worked as a cabinet-maker.

Zara was 27 years old and living in Boston, Ionia County when he enlisted as Sergeant in Company D on May 13, 1861. (Company D was composed in large part of men who came from western Ionia County and Eaton County.) Shortly after the Boston Light Guards arrived in Grand Rapids in late May of 1861 to be reorganized into the new Third Michigan then forming at Cantonment Anderson south of the city, Cotton wrote to the Grand Rapids Enquirer. “The Boston Light Guard are all right,” he wrote,

we were mustered into the service of the United States on May 23rd. We had a full company, as a great many of the Portland [Ionia County] Company joined us, which now is called D. They brought their flag with them, being disbanded they [thought] that the flag should never be returned to the ladies of Portland dishonored by deserters. We had only one man who refused to take the oath, and let it be recorded upon the annals of his country that his courage comes out of the ends of his fingers; let the fair sex avoid him like they would an adder. Our Regiment is almost full; we have also a fine Brass Band. Those who saw the First Regiment say that we come up to their standard, and some say we are decidedly ahead. Capt. [Moses] Houghton is just the man to lead us. Our motto is “Go ahead.”

Less than months after the Third Michigan arrived in Virginia, on September 8, 1861, Frank Siverd of Company G wrote that Fort Richardson, near Alexandria, Virginia was now the responsibility of Company D of the Third Michigan infantry. “We have already in position,” he wrote, “two 20-pounder rifled cannon . . . and will soon have ten or twelve more mounted, and then we will be ready and anxious for a visit from our friends (!) on the other hill. Co. D, has been detailed to take charge of the guns -- their position is no little envied by the remainder of the detachment -- Captain [Moses] Houghton . . . is second in command of the post, Lieutenant [Byron] Hess . . . acting Adjutant, Sergeant [Zara] Cotton . . . acting Sergeant-Major. Co. D is from Boston, Ionia County, and from the above record, might be considered a model company.”

During the winter of 1861-1862 Zara returned to Michigan on recruiting duty for the regiment, and by early March was recruiting in Saranac along with Lieutenant Abraham Whitney, also of the Third Michigan.

With the end of winter and recruiting duty as well as the onset of the spring campaign, Zara eventually returned to the Regiment in Virginia. He soon took sick, however, and by June of 1862, he was reported in the hospital at Bottom’s Bridge, Virginia, suffering from rheumatism and debility, and he was absent sick in the hospital in August of 1862. He claimed some years later that during a forced march at the battle of Fair Oaks, Virginia, on May 31, 1862, he “became over-heated which caused affection [sic] of the eyes” and that he “was nearly blind for several days and also quite deaf.”

In any case, he was a provost guard from October until he was discharged on November 11, 1862, in order to be transferred to Company B (or D), Sixth United States cavalry on December 6, 1862, at Falmouth, Virginia. He was reported missing in action in August of 1863 and in fact had been captured on July 3 at Fairfield, Pennsylvania while his company had been engaged with the enemy. He was confined at Fairfield then sent to Richmond, Virginia on July 21.

Zara was paroled at City Point, Virginia on July 23, and reported to Camp Parole, Maryland, on July 24, although he was at one point on a list of deserters from the Regiment. (He was probably reported as a deserter while actually a prisoner-of-war, which was not an uncommon administrative failure during the war.) In any case, he had returned to the Regiment by the end of October. He remained present for duty until he was mustered out of service at the expiration of his term of service on May 13, 1864. The existing record is unclear but at some point he may have been court-martialled, possibly as a result of the alleged desertion.

Zara returned to Michigan but eventually settled in Arkansas where he probably lived out the remainder of his life, working as a cabinet-maker for many years. (His parents were living in Saranac, Ionia County in 1870.)

By 1880 Zara was working as a lawyer and living his wife Susan in Jackson, Little River County, Arkansas. By 1889 Zara was living in Mount Ida, Montgomery County, Arkansas, and he was still living in Montgomery County in 1900.

Zara was married perhaps as many as four times: First to Esther Ann Rodgers, as noted above (it is possible that she died). Second to Susan Edna Salyers (b. 1847), on July 1, 1871 or 1873, and they had at least three children: Frederick, Theodore C. (b. 1877) and M. (b. 1868) who was adopted. They divorced in Polk County, Arkansas in 1884 or perhaps September of 1888. His third wife was a widow by the name Eliza Ann Powell Monroe (1857-1927), whom he married on September 16, 1888, in South Fork, Montgomery County, Arkansas, and they had at least four children: Thomas Luzern (b. 1889), Mary Luella (b. 1891), Gilbert (b. 1893) and William Elmer “Chief” (b. 1896). This marriage also ended in divorce in Garland County, Arkansas in 1903. Zara married his fourth wife, Mary Jane Norman (1859-1933), who was from Montgomery County, on December 13, 1903.



In 1889 he applied for and received a pension (no. 814020).

Zara died on September 4, 1905, in Arkansas and was presumably buried there.

In 1906 an application for pension was filed on behalf of a minor child (no. 841950), but the certificate was never granted (possibly as a consequence of her remarriage).

His widow Mary Jane apparently remarried in 1907, but in 1916 she applied for and received a pension (no. 836449; it is appears that her second husband died). She was living in Crystal Springs or Meyers, Arkansas, when she died in Meyers on April 10, 1933, and was buried in Peak cemetery.

Nathaniel Cotton - updated 7/30/2008

Nathaniel Cotton was born in 1821 in New York, the son of William (1792-1873) and Parnell (Russell 1796-1873).

Both New York natives William and Parnell were presumably married in New York where they resided for some years. Sometime after 1837 William and his family left New York and moved westward, eventually settling in Illinois; in 1840 William was living in Jackson, Will County, Illinois.

Nathaniel was probably living in Will County, Illinois, when he married his first wife, Ohio native Susannah Noel (1831-1854), near Joliet, Will County, Illinois, on July 4, 1850, and they had at least one son, William N. (b. 1853).

They went to live with Nathaniel’s parents in Jackson, Will County, where William owned a large farm (in fact he owned some $2000 worth of real estate while Nathaniel owned $650 worth of real estate). Curiously, Susannah Noel was also reported to be attending school and living with her family in Wilmington, Will County at the very same time she was listed as having been married within the year and living with Nathaniel and his family in Jackson, Will County. It is possible that they were in fact two separate women.

In any case, Susannah (or Susan) reportedly died giving birth to a daughter (it is not known what became of the child or other children). By 1860 William N. was living with his grandparents in Jackson, Will County.

Nathaniel was a widower when he married his second wife, a widow (or divorcee) named Frances “Fannie” M. Howland (maiden name of Cochran), also in Will County, Illinois, on May 23, 1857, and they eventually moved to Grand Rapids, Kent County, Michigan.

Although Nathaniel later claimed to have divorced Frances (sometime in the early 1860s presumably), there remained some doubt as to whether a decree was ever granted. According to a report prepared for the pension bureau, Nathaniel and Frances had reportedly lived together as man and wife until he enlisted in June of 1861, but that sometime after he went into the service she ran off with another man and that subsequently Nathaniel represented that she had died subsequently and he had obtained a divorce from her prior to her death and before he married his third wife in 1866. (See below)

In any case, Nathaniel was 40 years old and possibly living in Kent County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company F on May 13, 1861. He was reported to be driving an ambulance from July of 1862 through September of 1863, and in October he was absent sick in the hospital at Alexandria, Virginia, through December. Apparently he was admitted to Armory Square Hospital in Washington, DC, on July 17, 1863 and furloughed form the hospital on July 22, returning on August 22.

Nathaniel was reportedly driving an ambulance in the Washington area when he was thrown out of the wagon on December 1, injuring his right shoulder and right hip. He was apparently transferred to the Forty-eighth company, Second Battalion, Veterans’ Reserve Corps per G.O. No. 116 (War Department), on December 30, 1863 at Armory Square hospital, assigned to the VRC on January 12, 1864. (The VRC was made up of men who while ambulatory were generally incapable of performing regular military tasks due to having suffered debilitating wounds and/or diseases and were assigned to garrison the many supply depots, draft rendezvous, camps, forts, prisons, etc. scattered throughout the northern cities, thus freeing able-bodied men for regular military duty.) He was subsequently discharged for general disability at Armory Square Hospital on January 27, 1864.

Nathaniel listed Grand Rapids as his mailing address on his discharge paper, but it is not known if he ever returned to Michigan.

He married his third wife, Samaria Baird (b. 1833) on November 28, 1866, in Chicago (she had been married once before to Jacob Baird who had died in 1863).

Nathaniel and Samaria eventually settled in Kansas. By 1880 Nathaniel and his wife were living on a farm in Conway, Sumner County, Kansas. He was still living in Conway in the spring of 1891.

In 1863 Nathaniel applied for and received pension no. 29831.

Nathaniel was still living in Conway Springs, Kansas when he died on November 5, 1903, and was presumably buried in Conway Springs.

His widow Samaria received pension no. 598,028, and was drawing $30.00 in late 1923. Samaria was living in Conway Springs when she died on December 23, 1923.

Charles F. Corey - update 10/18/2016

Charles F. Corey, also known as “Coray”, was born 1840 or 1845 in Ontario County, New York, probably the son of Levi (b.1806) and Almira (b. 1817).

By 1850 Charles was attending school with his older siblings, including a sister Hannah, in Seneca, Ontario, New York. (Hannah would become the wife of another 3rd Michigan soldier, Henry Cutler, who would also join Company D.)

At some point the family moved to Michigan, probably settling in Clinton County before the war broke out.

Charles stood 5’8” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion, and was a 21-year-old farmer probably living in Clinton County when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861. He was a provost guard at First Division headquarters in September of 1863 through November, and he reenlisted on December 23, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Hamburg, Livingston County. He was on furlough in January of 1864 and absent sick in February. At some point he received a regimental court martial, and although the details are unknown, it may be that Charles failed to return from furlough after it expired due to his sickness.

He eventually returned to duty and was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the 3rd and 5th Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was reported on detached service from September through October. In December of 1864 and January of 1865, he was reported working in the medical department, and from February through April he was driving an ambulance. In May and June he was absent sick and mustered out of service on July 22, 1865 at Detroit.

Charles returned to Michigan after the war.

He married New York native Augusta (b. 1846), and they had at least four children: Mary or Ada May (b. 1868), Audrey (b. 1872) Myrtie (b. 1874) and Albert (b. 1879).

In 1870 Charles was living with his wife and daughter on a farm in Riley, Clinton County. By 1880 Charles was living with his wife and children in Cambria, Blue Earth County, Minnesota. He was still living in Cambria in 1890.

On April 5, 1910, Charles was admitted as a widower to the National Military Home in Milwaukee, and discharged at his own request on August 1, 1910 (He listed his nearest relative as Niece living in Eagle, Clinton County, Michigan.). He listed Chicago as his residence subsequent to discharge from the NMH.

In 1885 Charles applied for and received a pension (no. 408328).

Charles was probably a widower when he died on February 1, 1924, in Linnton, Oregon, and was presumably buried there.