Ohio

Henry Pool letters

Thanks to John Braden, noted expert on the 5th Michigan Infantry and a member of Company F, 3rd Michigan Infantry Reenactment Group, I have  copies of five letters written by Henry Pool (Company A) to the editor of the Jeffersonian Democrat, in Chardon, Ohio. (Henry had been born in Ohio and lived for a time in Geauga County.) Henry died of disease at the hospital at Savage Station, Virginia, on July 7, 1862. You can read Henry's updated biographical sketch right here.

field hospital at Savage Station, VA, after the battle of June 29, 1861

field hospital at Savage Station, VA, after the battle of June 29, 1861

Michael Welter update 10/18/2016

Michael Welter was born about 1834, in Germany or Luxembourg. In the spring of 1853 Michael left Germany and made his way to Antwerp, Belgium where he boarded the Adaline for America, arriving in New York City on June 3, 1853.

He was probably living in Ohio when he married to German- or Ohio-born Sophia Boehler (1835-1907), probably in Ohio, and they had ten children: Peter (b. 1856), Valentine (b. 1857), Mary (b. 1861), Henry (b. 1864), Lizzie (b. 1867), Michael (b. 1869), Joseph (b. 1871), Katie (b. 1874), Charles (b. 1877), Francis (b. 1880).

In 1860 Michael was working as a laborer and living with his wife and son in Tiffin, Seneca County, Ohio. Except for his service in the war, he would live in Tiffin all his life.

Michael enlisted as Corporal in Company B, 12th New York infantry at Syracuse, New York, on April 30, 1861, and was mustered in on May 13. For reasons unknown he was transferred to the Band of the 3rd Michigan Infantry on August 1, 1861 (or 1862). He was mustered out, probably “as a member of the Band and not as a musician,” on August 15, 1862, at Harrison’s Landing, Virginia.

Michael eventually returned to Ohio and was living in Tiffin in June and July of 1863 when he was listed in the draft registration records. He reentered the army in Company K, 107th Ohio Infantry, as a Private, on December 19, 1863, and subsequently transferred to Company K, 25th Ohio Infantry on July 13, 1865. There is no further record.

After the war, or after he left the army Michael returned to his home in Tiffin, Ohio. By 1870 he was working as a laborer and living with his wife and children in Tiffin’s 2nd Ward, Seneca County. Ohio. By 1880 he was working as a laborer and living with his wife and children in Tiffin, Ohio and he was still living in Tiffin, Ohio in 1890.

He applied for and received a pension (407406) for his service in the Ohio regiments.

Michael was probably living in Ohio when he died on April 25, 1892. He was buried in St. Joseph’s Cemetery, Tiffin, Seneca County, Ohio.

In May of 1892 his widow was living in Ohio when she applied for and received a pension (no. 359330). She was living in Tiffin, Ohio in 1900.

Charles R. Swain - update 8/29/2016

Charles R. Swain was born in May of 1843 in Tioga County, New York, probably the son of New York natives Robert (b. 1821) and Catharine (b. 1824).

By 1850 Charles was attending school with one Julia Lamonte and living with his family in Barton, Tioga County, New York where his father worked as a carpenter. Charles left New York with his family, and came to western Michigan. By 1860 Charles was attending school with three of his younger siblings, living with his family in Grand Rapids’ 4th Ward, Kent County, and probably working as a farm laborer for a wealthy farmer by the name of Conrad Phillips in Walker, Kent County.

Charles stood 5’9” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was 17 years old and residing in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company B on May 13, 1861. During the Old Third Michigan Infantry association’s annual reunion in December of 1882, Charles “told how in climbing out, by command, with the rest of the boys upon that festive occasion, [First] Bull Run, he left behind his jacket containing his first month's salary, 11 gold dollars.”

Charles was detached as a pioneer from July of 1862 through November, in the Regimental commissary department from January of 1863 through August, at First Division headquarters in October, and a First Division teamster in November. He reenlisted on December 23, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Grand Rapids, Third Ward, was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864 and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February. In April of 1864 he was reported with the Brigade wagon train through May (probably as a teamster), and he was on detached service in the ammunition train when he was transferred to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He remained on detached service through May of 1865, and probably until he was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

While it’s possible he returned to his family home in western Michigan it is unclear where Charles settled after the war.

He was possibly living in Ohio when Charles married New York native Clarinda Haughton (1848-1911).

By 1870 Charles was working as a farmer and living with his wife and her family in Washington, Lucas County, Ohio. (His father-in-law Smith Haughton held some $9500 in real estate and his wife, Clarinda, owned $5000 in real estate and was keeping a boarding house.)

Charles and his wife eventually moved to Grand Rapids where he worked as a fireman. “Charley Swain,” wrote the Democrat on August 2, 1874, “jumped into a creek at Muskegon yesterday morning and rescued an inhabitant from drowning. He formerly resided in Milwaukee, and upon investigation his body was found enclosed in iron bands.”

In January of 1875 it was reported that Swain, “one of the most efficient Democratic workers of the 7th Ward, a brave fireman and worthy citizen, is soon to leave the city and take up residence on a farm near Toledo, Ohio. While we regret his leaving the Valley city, we are glad to know he will emigrate to a thoroughly Democratic State, where the ‘fog horn’ of Governor Allen rallied the faithful to victory. The ‘boys’ of the ‘machine’ propose to supply Charley with an outfit of agricultural implements.”

By 1878, however, he had returned to Grand Rapids where he had resumed his trade of fireman. “Mr. Charles Swain,” wrote the Democrat on May 25, “the gentlemanly foreman, says the rooms [for a new engine house] will be open for the reception of the public generally today, and he, with his brother firemen, desire especially that those who aided them in procuring means to furnish their rooms should look in and see how the money has been expended.”

By 1880 Charles was still working as a fireman and living with his wife on Bronson Street in Grand Rapids’ 4th Ward. He was still in Grand Rapids in 1882 but by 1892 was living in Lucas County, Ohio, when he provided an affidavit in the pension application for Rolandus Freet who had also served in the Old Third during the war. That same year he also applied for and received a pension (no. 830060). By 1895 Charles had moved back to Toledo. In 1900 Charles was working as a carpenter and living with his wife Clarinda in Toledo’s 10th Ward, Lucas County, Ohio.

He was a member of the Old 3rd Michigan Infantry Association, Grand Army of the Republic Custer post no. 5 in Grand Rapids and an active Democrat. Charles died on October 25, 1905, probably in Toledo, Ohio, and was buried in Woodland cemetery, Toledo.

In 1905 his widow was living in Ohio when she applied for and received a pension (no. 604678).


Charles Franklin Shaft - update 8/30/2016

Charles Franklin Shaft was born in 1840 in Herkimer, Herkimer County, New York, the son of New York natives Jacob V. Sr. (1810-1886) and Margaret Jane (Putnam, 1820-1861).

Charles’ parents were married in 1836 in Geneva, Ontario County, Ohio, although both were living in New York at the time. They settled first in Canastota, Madison County, New York -- where Jacob had been living -- but soon moved on to Herkimer County, New York where they were living by 1840. By 1848 they had moved westward and were living in Shiawassee County, Michigan; and by 1850 had settled in Woodhull, Shiawassee County where Charles was attending school with his siblings (including his older brother John would would also enlist in the 3rd Michigan Infantry). By 1860 Charles was living with his family in Owosso, Shiawassee County. (Jacob Sr. remarried in 1863 to one Jane Offen Reed, in Venice, Sandusky County, Ohio.)

Charles stood 5’10” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was a 21-year-old farmer probably living in Owosso’s Second Ward when he enlisted in Company G on May 13, 1861, with his older brother John. According to Frank Siverd of Company G, during the first battle of Bull Run, Virginia, on Sunday, July 21, one of the Shaft boys (he does not mention which one) was taken prisoner, along with Joshua Benson and Oscar Van Wormer, all of Company G. They were captured, wrote Siverd, “by four rebel scouts; they discovered the boys, and they showing too much pluck to be marched into the rebel camp, let them go. It is presumed they made pretty good double quick time from that to camp.” By the first week of September Charles was in the Regimental hospital suffering from a slight fever.

By early December Charles was in the general hospital in Alexandria, suffering from typhoid fever, but he quickly recovered and by the first of the year had rejoined the Regiment. He remained present for duty through 182 and 1863 and reenlisted on December 24, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Owosso’s 2nd Ward.

Charles was probably absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864, along with his brother John. In fact while on furlough Charles married his step-sister, Ohio native Sanana or Susanna Reed (b. 1847), on January 23, 1864, at his father’s home in Sherman Township, Huron County, Ohio. And they had at least one child: Cora (b. 1874). The very same day his brother John married Mena Reamer, also in Sherman. Charles and Sana had at least two children: Matilda (b. 1867) and Cora (b. 1874).

He probably returned to the Regiment with his brother on or about the first of February.

Sometime in early May of 1864 he was wounded slightly in the right arm, and was absent sick in the hospital but had probably returned to duty by the time he was transferred to Company F, 5th Michigan Infantry upon consolidation of the 3rd and 5th Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. Charles was wounded, probably in one of his wrists and hands, on June 16, 1864, near Petersburg, Virginia -- possibly at the same time his brother John received his mortal wounds -- and was subsequently hospitalized. Charles stated later that while the regiment was charging the enemy’s works at Petersburg on June 16, he was struck in his left hand by a musket ball. The ball entered “his hand between the thumb and the first joint of the forefinger, passing through the hand into the forearm and through the wrist joint coming out in front just above the wrist joint rendering his left wrist useless.” He was admitted on June 21 to Lincoln hospital in Washington, DC, where he was a patient in late November of 1864 when he applied for a transfer to a hospital in Detroit to be “nearer home.”

His request was denied, and by early December of 1864 he was still a patient at Lincoln hospital when it was reported that he had been recommended for transfer to the Veterans Reserve Corps (VRC) (Curiously his military service record notes that he “has yet two years to serve and is perfectly able to do the duty assigned to him. He is not a fit subject for transfer.”)

He was eventually reported to have been transferred on May 19, 1865, by G.O. No. 6, to the VRC, but in fact it appears he was actually transferred to the 7th Company, 2nd Battalion, VRC, from Lincoln hospital as early as late December. Certainly by early January of 1865 he is serving with the VRC. On April 24, 1865, he was transferred to the 16th Company, 2nd Battalion VRC, and discharged at Washington, DC on August 23, 1865, from 16th company, 2nd Battalion VRC.

It is unclear if Charles ever returned to Michigan -- his wife had remained in Ohio while he was in the army and he returned to Ohio after the war. By January of 1866 he was living in Oxford, Erie County, Ohio when he applied for and received a pension (no. 87902) in 1867.

By 1870 Charles father was living in York Station, Sandusky County, Ohio, when he applied for and received a dependent father’s pension (no. 140,250) -- based on the service of John Shaft, Charles’ brother who died during the war, and drawing $8.00 per month by 1870.

Charles lived in Ohio the rest of his life, eventually settling in Clyde, Sandusky County, but he was never able to work after he returned from the army and by the late 1870s he and his family were forced to relying on the aid of the Township. By 1880 Charles was working as a laborer and living with his wife and children in Clyde, Ohio.

Charles died, probably of consumption, on September 6, 1881, in Clyde, Ohio, and is buried in an unmarked grave in McPherson cemetery.

Susanna applied for a widow’s pension (no. 287255), but the certificate was never granted since she died just five months after Charles, in February of 1882, leaving their only child an orphan. Subsequently a minor child’s dependent’s pension application was filed and approved (no. 238465).

Abram A. Martindale - update 8/23/2016

Abram A. Martindale was born around 1838 in Ohio, the son of New York natives Benjamin Franklin (1804-1883) and Esther (or Hester) Gray (1799-1864).

Abram’s parents were married in in 1828 in Brutus, Cayuga County, New York. Benjamin lived in Cayuga County for some years but by 1838 he moved his family to Ohio, then back to New York between 1838 and 1842 before moving to western Michigan sometime after 1844. By 1850 Abram was living with his family in Grand Rapids, where his father worked as a carpenter.

Abram was living in Grand Rapids when he married Harriet Hotchkiss on December 15, 1859. In 1860 his father Benjamin was living in Walker, Kent County. (Benjamin married his second wife, Sarah A. Rindge, probably in Grand Rapids, Kent County, Michigan.)

Abram was 23 years old and probably living in Plainfield, Kent County when he enlisted as Fourth Sergeant in Company F on May 13, 1861. He allegedly deserted on March 23, 1862, or August 28, 1862, or September 21, 1862 at Upton’s Hill, Virginia. In fact, he had probably been hospitalized in late July, and by August 4 he was reported as a patient in the general hospital at Annapolis, Maryland. In fact, he was among the sick and wounded soldiers who had been brought to New York from Alexandria, Virginia aboard the steamer Daniel Webster, on September 5.

Nevertheless, Abram was reduced to the ranks from First Sergeant on September 9, 1862. It is unknown what happened to Abram after he returned to Alexandria. It appears that he failed to join the regiment, though, and it is possible that he returned to Michigan, perhaps to recover his health.

Abram was still absent from duty when he was transferred as a deserter to Company F, 5th Michigan Infantry upon consolidation of the 3rd and 5th Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He eventually reported to the provost marshal at New York City on April 13, 1865, and was officially returned from desertion on May 17, 1865 near Washington, DC, under the President’s Proclamation of March 11, 1865, providing amnesty for deserters. He was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

It is unknown if Abram returned to Michigan after the war. By 1870 he was working as a carpenter and living in Jamesville, Martin County, North Carolina. (His father and stepmother were living in Walker, Kent County in 1870.) Abram apparently married Cora M. Poston (b. 1858) and they had at least three children: Fielder (1876-1942), Wallace Ames or Amos (1878-1962) and Edgar (b. 1880).

Abram and his family were living in Maryland in 1876 but in Grand Rapids, Michigan two years later when Wallace was born. By 1880 they were back in Maryland where Abram was working as a carpenter and living with Cora and his children in the 1st Precinct, Baltimore.

Abram died of a liver abcess on November 18, 1880 in Cincinnati, Ohio, and was presumably buried there. (Although oddly enough, he is listed in the Kent County, Michigan Death Returns, but having died in Cincinnati. Was his body returned to Michigan or Maryland for interment? To date no records have come to light confirming any burial location.)

Cora returned to Grand Rapids in 1881 but soon went back to Baltimore where she was living in 1886, 1921 and 1923. No pension seems to be available.

Ransom B. Howell - update 8/29/2016

Ransom B. Howell was born September 27, 1834, in New York, the son of Joseph.

Ransom was probably living and working in Grand Rapids, Kent County sometime before the war broke out.

Ransom stood 5’10’ with blue eyes, dark hair and a light complexion and was 28 years old and probably living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company A, on June 10, 1861. (Company A was made up largely of men from Grand Rapids, and many of whom had served in various local militia units before the war, specifically the Valley City Guards, or VCG, under the command of Captain Samuel Judd, who would also command Company A.)

He was reported absent sick in July of 1862, and listed as missing in action on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run. In fact, Ransom had been wounded and taken prisoner at Second Bull Run, paroled at Centerville, Virginia, on September 6, reported to Camp Parole, near Annapolis, Maryland, on October 23 and sent back to the Army of the Potomac on December 14 where he was present for duty on or about December 20, 1862, and subsequently admitted to Mt. Pleasant hospital in Washington, DC.

Ransom eventually returned to the Regiment on December 20, 1862 at Camp Pitcher, Virginia, and was a recipient of the Kearny Cross for his participation in the battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia, on May 3, 1863. According to Ransom, while elements of the Third Michigan were in support of a battery at Chancellorsville, he had been deafened in his left ear by an exploding caisson, which apparently injured the eardrum. Another member of his company William Jubb confirmed this. When the caisson exploded he saw Ransom “stagger. I heard him cry out and grasp his head with his hands. I went to him and found that he was terribly jarred and though nothing had struck him he was in great distress from the shock.”

By mid-July Ransom was apparently taken sick with chronic diarrhea, and in August of 1863 was absent sick in the hospital since July 15, probably with chronic diarrhea. He was reportedly suffering from chronic diarrhea in December of 1863 and was subsequently treated first in the regimental hospital and then in Mt. Pleasant hospital in Washington, DC.

Ransom was on furlough from the hospital when he married Ohio native Margaret Jane “Maggie” Alexander (b. 1835), on January 4, 1864, at Steubenville, Jefferson County, Ohio, and they had at least five children: Ransom Wilber (b. 1870), Henry Orvis (b. 1873), Margaret “Maggie” Alma (b. 1877), Avis F. (b. 1882) and Ami (b. 1885).

Ransom returned to Virginia and was sick in Camp Convalescent near Alexandria, Virginia, when, on January 25, 1864, his wife, who was living at their home in Salineville, Ohio, wrote to President Lincoln asking his assistance in getting a discharge for her husband.

Will you pardon a stranger [she wrote] for intruding upon your time for a moment, and give attention to her prayers. I have a husband in the Third Regiment Michigan Infantry. He has been out since early in June 1861 and has participated in the following battles: to wit First Bull Run, the siege of Yorktown, Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, Seven days before Richmond, Second Bull Run, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg. Soon after the last battle he was taken sick and has been in the hospital and convalescent camp since the 30th of July. His disease, chronic diarrhea. My prayer is that for the sake of an aged mother and a wife dependent on his labor for support that you will grant him his discharge; that if possible by returning to his native climate he may regain his health. He is now in the Convalescent Camp near Alexandria, Virginia. He is a member of company A 3rd Regt. Mich. My husband was awarded a [Kearny] Cross of Honor by General Birney after the battle of Chancellorsville.”

On February 18, her request was denied. She was informed “that upon investigation, it is ascertained that your husband is not a proper subject for discharge, and that he will soon be returned to duty with his Regiment.

In fact, Ransom remained hospitalized and was transferred on February 18, 1864, as a Corporal to Company H, Twenty-fourth Regiment, Veterans’ Reserve Corps, and was at Camp Distribution in Virginia and present for duty on April 30. He remained at Camp distribution until he was mustered out on June 9, 1864.

After the war Ransom returned to Ohio where he lived the rest of his life.

In 1870 Ransom was working as a miner and living with “Maggie” in Washington, Columbiana County, Ohio. By 1876 he was living in Salineville, Columbiana County, Ohio. By 1880 he was working as an “agent” and living with his wife and children in Washington, Columbiana County, Ohio. He also worked as a coal miner at one time. He was still living in Salineville, Ohio, in 1889, in 1900 when he testified in the pension application of William Jubb (although the census of 1900 lists him in Washington) and he and Maggie were living in Salineville in 1910.

He was a member of the 3rd Michigan Infantry Association, and in 1876 he applied for and received a pension (no. 343472), drawing $30 per month by 1913.

Ransom died of paralysis on April 18, 1913, probably at home in Salineville and was buried in Woodland cemetery, Salineville, Ohio.

In May of 1912 his widow Maggie was residing in Ohio when she applied for and received a pension (no. 761379). Margaret was still living in Salineville in 1920; also living with her were her two sons and two daughters.


William Henry Harrison Goff updated 11/14/2017

William Henry Harrison Goff was born July 19, 1844, in Carlisle,  Lorain County, Ohio, the son of New York natives Albert C. Goff (b. 1821) and Eunice Pangborn (1828-1860). 

Albert and Eunice were married in 1842 in Ferrisburgh, Addison County, Vermont. By 1844 they had settled in Ohio and by 1850 were still living in Elyria, Ohio. By 1855 Albert had settled his family in Michigan and in 1860 William was attending school with two of his younger siblings and living with his family on a farm in Grand Rapids, Kent County, where William also worked as a farm laborer. 

He stood 5’8” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion, and was an 18-year-old farmer possibly living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company A on August 8, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered the same day. (Albert, his father, was living in Grand Rapids in 1862.) He joined the Regiment on September 8 at Fairfax Seminary, Virginia, was apparently admitted to McDougal hospital in Washington, DC, on January 9, 1863, and was still in the hospital when he was transferred to Company A, 5th Michigan Infantry upon consolidation of the 3rd and 5th Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He remained hospitalized until he was mustered out on May 31, 1865. 

After the war William eventually returned to Michigan. 

He married Pennsylvania native Amy L. Wheeler (b. 1846) on September 24, 1871, in Otsego, Allegan County; they were divorced in 1885. 

He was possibly residing in Grand Rapids in 1874. By 1880 he had moved to Wexford County and was working as a bookkeeper and living with his wife Amy in Cadillac; also living with them was Mary A. Wheeler, listed as “Mother” and probably Amy’s mother He was still living in Cadillac in 1882, and in 1883, drawing $13.00 per for deafness (pension no. 87,118). William was still living in Cadillac in 1890 reportedly suffering from complete deafness, and was a member of the Old 3rd Michigan Infantry Association. He operated the Vosberg & Goff meat market in Cadillac

According to his father Albert, William left his home in Cadillac, Michigan and went on a visit to Otsego, Allegan County and was taken seriously ill and lived only a few days. 

William died of disease on January 20, 1891, probably in the vicinity of Reynolds Township, Montcalm County, although his father claimed that his remains were removed to Ensley, Newaygo County for burial in fact he was buried in Reynolds Township cemetery where there is a government headstone for William.

Amy was living as his widow in Grand Rapids at 303 Ottawa in 1890. His father was possibly living in Gilman, Iroquois County, Illinois by 1897. His application for a dependent father’s pension was rejected.

Charles W. Furber

Charles W. Furber, also known as “Ferber,” was born 1842 in Ohio, the son of Charles (b. 1808) and Mary (b. 1817).

Charles (elder) left England and immigrated to the United States where he met Ohio native Mary. They were married sometime before 1840 when they were living in Pennsylvania. By 1844 they had moved to Ohio where they resided for some years. Charles and Mary took their family and moved to Michigan from Ohio sometime between 1848 and 1850 when Charles (younger) was attending school with his siblings and living with his family in Leighton, Allegan County where his father was a farmer. By 1860 Charles was a farm laborer living in Leighton on the family farm.

He was 19 years old and probably living in the vicinity of Hastings, Barry County when he enlisted in the Hastings Rifle Company in April of 1861. The company was disbanded shortly after it arrived in Grand Rapids and its members distributed to other companies of the Third Michigan infantry then forming at Cantonment Anderson just south of the city. Charles eventually enlisted with his guardian’s or parents’ consent in Company K on May 13, 1861. He was wounded, probably only slightly, on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, but he was nonetheless sent to Carver Hospital in Washington, DC, and then to a hospital at Fort McHenry, Baltimore, Maryland. In October he was reported absent sick in a general hospital where he remained through May of 1863.

It is possible that he returned to duty and was either wounded on May 3, 1863, at Chancellorsville, Virginia, or became ill sometime in May or early June; it is also possible that he never returned to duty but simply transferred to another hospital.

In any case, on June 7, 1863, he was reported in a general hospital in Alexandria, Virginia where he remained through December. But according to Andrew Kilpatrick, also of Company E, Charles was present for duty with the regiment when he was nearly killed in a diving accident while the men were swimming in Hegemon Creek. According to official records, however, he remained hospitalized, as a Corporal, until he was mustered out on June 20, 1864, at Detroit.

It seems quite likely that Charles was so seriously injured in his diving into a submerged tree stump in the River that he never recovered.

In 1865 Charles applied for and received a pension (no. 51797). He apparently returned to his family home in Allegan County where he died on October 5, 1865, presumably from wounds or sickness contracted while in the army, and was buried at Hooker cemetery in Leighton. (However there seems to be no marker for him or his family.)

His parents were still living in Leighton, Allegan County in 1870 and 1880.

Benjamin Franklin “Frank” Fritz

Benjamin Franklin “Frank” Fritz, also known as “Fritts,” was born 1843 in Medina, Ohio, the son of John (b. 1816) and Parthenia (Irish, b. 1827).

Pennsylvania native John married Ohioan Parthenia, presumably in Ohio where they settled and resided for some years. Sometime after 1853 the family left Ohio and settled in Michigan. By 1860 Ben (known as “Franklin”) was attending school with three of his younger siblings and living with his family on a farm in Alaiedon, Ingham County. (Next door lived the Nelson Irish family, presumably Parthenia’s younger brother.)

Ben was an 18-year-old carpenter probably living with his family in Ingham County when he enlisted with the consent of the Justice of the Peace in Company E on May 13, 1861.

Some years after the war Benjamin recalled his first Fourth of July in the army, when he met President Lincoln. In June of 1861, Ben wrote in 1886,

we went to Washington, and encamped about four miles up the Potomac River on the Maryland side. On the 4th of July four of the young kids of Co. E, of whom I was one, were strolling up the River road, when we met a large cab driving toward the city. Two colored men sat on the driver’s seat, in suits of dark blue, with large plain brass buttons and plug hats. One of the boys remarked: “They think they are h__l don’t they? Let’s have some fun with them.” All agreed, and as they came up we kept the road. So did they. The team came to a halt, and a voice form the cab said, “What’s wanted?” and when we looked that way, there was a silver-haired man looking out the door. We told him we wanted to take a ride with him to Washington to see Old Abe. Thereupon he stepped out of the carriage saying, “Didn’t you ever see him?” and was followed by another man, and then another, until four men stood in front of us four boys. I had only noticed that they were fine-looking men, when the first one said: “Soldiers, I introduce to you the President of the United States; also, Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War; Hon. Wm. H. Seward, and myself, Hon. Gideon Wells.” The President stepped forward, shook hands with us and laughed at the joke; but our situation was beyond the laughing point, and soon there were four silly looking kids going for camp at quickstep gait.

Ben was reported on detached service in November and December of 1861, and from January of 1862 through April was present for duty. On June 30, 1862, he was reported missing in action at White Oak Swamp, Virginia, and subsequently returned to the Regiment on August 28 at Upton’s Hill, Virginia. He was again reported missing in action at Aiken’s Landing, Virginia, on September 13. In fact, he was taken prisoner on July 1 at Malvern Hill, Virginia, and paroled on September 8 or 18. According to the Richmond Dispatch of September 15, 1862,

Three thousand three hundred of the Yankee prisoners left Richmond on Saturday for Varina to be exchanged. – Such as could not walk were conveyed away in wagons. The officers, of which there were 61, went in carriages, provided for the purpose. As the long line filed past the C. S. Prison, on Cary Street, they greeted their less lucky compeers with a feeble cheer. A small cavalry escort accompanied them down. Another large gang were started for Aiken’s landing, on James River, yesterday morning. During Saturday and Sunday five thousand two hundred and twenty-eight were sent away. This leaves on hand only about seven hundred, a good many of whom are in the hospital under treatment for wounds or disease, who were unable to bear removal. Three Yankee women and eight Yankee deserters, or rather men who came over to us and professed to be such, were sent from Castle Thunder. Though these deserters professed to have left their brethren in great disgust, they were very willing to be sent back to the North. The departure of the prisoners will save the Confederate Government an expense of about $4,000 per day, which was the average that their food as soldiers cost.

Apparently, shortly after he was released from captivity, Ben was transferred to the regular cavalry. His service record states that he was a “paroled prisoner [and] has been exchanged and enlisted in regular cavalry [on November 5] and discharged from this Regt. Never reported for duty since exchange.” The War Department noted in his pension record, however, that he was discharged on November 5, 1862, “by reason of enlistment in the mounted service U.S.A., under G.O. 154, A.G.O. of 1862.”

For reasons that remain unclear, and apparently without being discharged from the cavalry, Fritz enlisted in Company L, First Michigan Engineers and Mechanics as a Private on July 15, 1863, at Clinton, Lenawee County, for 3 years, listing Clinton as his place of residence, and was mustered the same day at Detroit, crediting Clinton. He was reported on the rolls as present in July and August of 1863 and to April 30, 1865, and, according to one Benjamin Craig, also a member of Company L, Fritz was sick with jaundice in the summer of 1864 at Stevenson, Alabama. Craig also testified that Fritz had” the chronic diarrhea in December of the same year at Murfreesboro, Tenn.,” and further that he “Never saw Frank Fritz after December, 1864.”

According to several other postwar affidavits by former comrades in the E & M, Fritz contracted “rheumatism” in his back and hips while being exposed to the rain in late April of 1865, near Roanoke, North Carolina. He was absent in May and June, and under arrest in July and August of 1865, and absent in the military prison in Nashville, Tennessee from July 26, 1865, probably as a consequence of his having deserted from the regular army. In any case he was mustered out with his company at Nashville, Tennessee on September 22, 1865. According to the War Department, Fritz had enlisted in the Engineers and Mechanics in violation of the old Twenty-second (new Fiftieth) Article of War, “being a deserter at large from the mounted service U.S.A.”

After the war Benjamin returned to Michigan, probably to Ingham County, very possibly to the Mason area, where he worked as a farmer many years. In 1870 he was working as a farm laborer and living with his parents in Mason, Alaidon Township, Ingham County. (His parents were living in Alaiedon, Ingham County in 1880.0

According to a statement given in April of 1893, Jerome Loomis of Mason testified that he and Fritz had lived as neighbors “just across the public road, for the past twenty years.” Henry Every, also from Mason, claimed he had lived near Fritz as a neighbor for some fifteen years. Benjamin was living in Mason in 1886 and might have been living in Lansing in 1888. Ben gave his residence as Lansing when he transferred his Grand Army of the Republic membership from Phil McKernan Post No. 53 to Charles Foster Post No. 42 in Lansing in June of 1884 (the transfer was granted in September of that year).

He married Michigan native Ruth H. or A. Jeffreys (b. 1851) on June 3, 1878, in Clinton County, and they had at least one child: James P. (b. 1879). It is possible that Ruth was his second wife.

By 1880 Ben was working as a farm hand and living with his wife and son in Greenbush, Clinton County; also living with them was his daughter: Martha B. (b. 1867).

It is unclear what became of his relationship with Ruth since it seems that he was working as a farmer in Alaidon, Ingham County when he married a widow who had been working as a domestic, Canadian-born Sarah Fraser Rose (b. 1861) on March 25, 1894, at Mason. (Ben was residing in Alaiedon in 1894.) They were residing in Morrice, Shiawassee County in June of 1895.

In 1889 Ben applied for a pension (no. 713769), but the certificate was never granted.

Ben died on July 31, 1895, possibly in the vicinity of Morrice, and was presumably buried near Morrice.

His widow Sarah was living in Morrice, Shiawassee County when she applied for a pension (no. 619547) in September of 1895, but the certificate was never granted. Sarah remarried one C. B. Grinnell on January 18, 1896.

Rolandus Freet

Rolandus Freet was born 1843 in McCutcheonville, Wyandotte County, Ohio, the son of Henry (b. 1793) and Ruth (b. 1820).

By 1841 Virginia-born Henry and New York native Ruth had settled their family in Ohio and in 1850 Henry was working as a merchant and Rolandus was attending school with his siblings in Tymochtee, Wyandotte County, Ohio. By 1860 Rolandus was attending school with his siblings and living with his mother (she owned $7000 worth of real estate) in Tymochtee , Ohio. Rolandus eventually left Ohio, probably in early 1861, and moved to western Michigan.

Rolandus stood 5’3” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion, and was an 18-year-old cook who had just arrived in Grand Rapids from Wyandotte when he enlisted as a Musician in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.)

He was absent sick in a general hospital in October of 1862 and again in December. He was reported to be suffering from “primary syphilis” February 2-6, 1863 but was returned to duty. He was reported as absent without leave in late August of 1863, and listed as treated for gonorrhea September 22 to October 1, 1863, and again returned to duty. He eventually rejoined the Regiment and on December 21, 1863, he reenlisted at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Ada, Kent County, and was absent on 30 days’ veteran’s furlough in January of 1864.

He presumably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February and was hospitalized on April 4, 1864. He remained absent sick, possibly in a hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, through May and was still absent sick when he was transferred as a Musician to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was discharged from Satterlee hospital in Philadelphia and returned to duty on February 10, 1865.

On February 11, the day following his discharge from the hospital, Rolandus was arrested and charged with desertion by the Provost Marshal of the Fourth district in Philadelphia. It was alleged that Freet, who was listed as a Drummer in Company C, Third Michigan infantry, “did without proper authority absent himself from a detachment of men at Philadelphia, while on his way to Washington” from February 10 until February 11, “when he was apprehended and delivered to” the Provost Marshal. He was subsequently sent to the Prince Street military prison in Alexandria, where, on February 15 and again on March 2, Rolandus gave his statement in defense against the charges. He claimed that he served with his Regiment, the Third Michigan, until April 20, 1864, when he was taken sick at Brandy Station, Virginia. He was then

transferred to Satterlee hospital at Phila., where I remained until the 10th of February 1865, when I was discharged from the hospital to go to my Regiment. We was [sic] sent to the Baltimore depot. When we arrived there I asked the Sergt. in charge of the squad if I could go to a saloon and get something to eat. He sent a guard with me; the guard met a friend there and detained me some time. I could not leave until he came with me. When we got back to the depot the train had gone. I asked the guard what I should do. He told me that he had nothing to do with me. I then got in the Market Street cars, and on the way a man got in the cars, who wore a blouse. When I got out of the cars on 41st Street, he got out also. I felt someone tap me on the shoulder. I looked around, and this man asked me if I had not been sent to my Regt with a guard. I told him I was and that I had missed the train [and that] I was on my way to report to the hospital, to go with a squad the next day. He then arrested me . . . and took me before the Provost Marshal who committed me as a deserter and sent me to Prince Street Military Prison, Alexandria, Va. I had no intention of deserting if the guard could have let me come back to get on the train.

Rolandus was transferred to Company C, Fifth Michigan infantry on February 28 or March 1 near Petersburg, Virginia, and mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war Rolandus eventually returned to Michigan and was admitted to Harper hospital (the predecessor to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home hospital) in Detroit on July 1, 1870, with a diagnosis of “ulceration of the cornea and granulated eyelids.” By the end of the following year he had recovered and was discharged on December 10.

He was listed as single and a Protestant when he was admitted to the National Military Home at Milwaukee on June 23 or 28, 1871. Rolandus was expelled from the home on January 14, 1872, for reason(s) unknown. (Interestingly, his next-of-kin was listed as his mother, Mrs. Ruth Freet of Wyandotte. By 1880 she was reported as divorced and living in Burwick, Seneca County, Ohio.) By 1890 Rolandus was living in Delphos, Ohio. He was admitted to the southern branch, National Military Home in Hampton, Virginia, on January 14, 1893. He was reportedly suffering from or had suffered from syphilis in 1897.

In 1870 he applied for and received a pension (no. 622163), drawing $12 per month by 1891.

Rolandus was apparently admitted to the Marion, Indiana, Branch, National Military Home where he died on November 27, 1900, and was buried in the Marion National Cemetery: section 1, row 5 (or 6), no. 10.

William P. Draper - update 8/28/2016

William P. Draper was born April 8, 1830, in Bayham, Ontario, Canada, the son of Isaac.

William married Ontario native Sarah Souckes (b. 1838) on February 13, 1853, in Bayham, Canada, and they had at least four children: Mary (b. 1854), Eliza (b. 1856), Isaac (b. 1858), Louisa (b. 1860) and Helen Jane (b. 1862).

The family left Canada sometime after 1858 and by 1860 William had settled them on a farm Courtland, Kent County, Michigan.

William stood 5’8” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was a 31-year-old farmer probably living in Courtland when he enlisted in Company A on August 14, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered the same day. He joined the Regiment on September 18 at Fairfax Seminary, Virginia, and was reported absent sick in the hospital from June of 1863 through July. He eventually returned to duty and was first reported as missing in action May 8, 1864, at the Wilderness, Virginia, and in fact had been taken prisoner on May 7 and confined at Andersonville, Georgia. William was transferred as missing-in-action to Company C, 5th Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the 3rd and 5th Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864.

On June 29 William was admitted to the prison hospital suffering from consumption and returned to his quarters on November 14. The following day, November 15, he was transferred to Savannah, Georgia where he was paroled on November 20, 1864, and admitted to the Naval School hospital in Annapolis, Maryland on December 4. He was on furlough from the hospital in January of 1865, staying with his brother Captain James Draper in Toledo. On January 18, 1865, Dr. D. B. Sturgeon of Toledo wrote a certification that Draper was suffering from chronic dysentery and unable to leave the city, thus requiring an extension of his furlough.

He never recovered.

On February 5, 1865, Dr. Sturgeon wrote to the War Department that William had died on February 4, 1865, in Toledo of chronic dysentery. He was buried in Forest Cemetery, Toledo: 6-5-8.

In 1865 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 71075). Sarah subsequently remarried to one Gideon Squiers and she filed for a pension on behalf of minor children (no. 106728). By 1870 Sarah was living with her second husband, his children, as well as three of her children from her marriage to William Draper (the children were listed as Draper’s).


Samuel Dowell

Samuel Dowell was born 1839 in Ohio, the son of Charles (b. 1799) and Elizabeth (Pool, 1802-1860).

Virginia-born Charles married Maryland native Elizabeth in 1821 and they eventually settled in Ohio. The family moved west and had settled in western Michigan by 1860 when Samuel was working as a farmer and living with his family in Windsor, Eaton County, where his father owned a large farm. Shortly after the war broke out Samuel became a member of the Lansing company called the “Williams’ Rifles”, whose members would serve as the nucleus of Company G.

Indeed, Samuel was 22 years old and residing in Windsor when he enlisted in Company G on May 10, 1861. According to Frank Siverd of Company G, Samuel was in the “measles infirmary” shortly before the regiment left Michigan in June of 1861. (According to Siverd Regimental Surgeon D. W. Bliss, in order “to prevent the disease spreading, as soon as the first symptoms appear,” had all the measle cases “removed to the house of a physician, some three miles from camp.”)

Samuel apparently recovered sufficiently enough to leave Michigan with the regiment on June 13, 1861. He was killed in action on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia.

Homer Thayer, also of Company G, described how Samuel had died.

Color Sergeant Charles T. Foster of Company G “was the first to fall [at Fair Oaks]. He was bravely holding the colors, and by his coolness and courage, doing much to encourage the boys to press on. Orderly E. F. Siverd was soon after wounded, but still did his duty and urged his comrades on. Soon after this Corporals Case B. Wickham, John Blanchard and Nathaniel T. Atkinson, and privates Samuel Dowell and Charles T. Gaskill received fatal shots. Atkinson and Dowell were brought from the field before they died. All have been buried, and their resting places marked with aboard giving the name, company and Regiment.”

Samuel’s remains were removed from their temporary grave on the battlefield to Seven Pines National Cemetery: section A, grave 345.

In 1867 his father was living in East Windsor, Eaton County when he applied for and received a pension (no. 131,455).

Henry Paschal Cutler

Henry Paschal Cutler was born December 14, 1841, in Henrietta (?), Ohio, the son of David R. (b. 1814) and Vienna R. (Wright, b. 1819).

Massachusetts natives David and Vienna were probably married in Massachusetts before 1837 when their oldest daughter Anna was born. Sometime between 1837 and 1839 the family moved to Ohio where they resided for a number of years. Henry’s family left Ohio and by 1850 had settled in Watertown, Clinton County Michigan, where Henry was attending school.

Henry married 16-year-old New York native Hannah M. Corey (1843-1928) on April 29, 1859, and they had at least three children: Charles R. or S. (1859-1867), Moses (b. 1861) and Harvey (1867-1882), Agnes (b. 1872), a son (b. 1874) and Brice C. or G. (b. 1876).

By 1860 Henry was a farmer living with his wife in Riley, Clinton County, where both of them were also apparently attending school. Hannah was the sister of Charles Corey, also probably from Clinton County and born in New York, who would also join Company D, Third Michigan.

Henry stood 5’9” with gray eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was 19 years old and still residing in Clinton County when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861. He was sick in the hospital in July and August of 1862, and reported as a deserter on September 21, 1862, at Upton’s Hill, Virginia, but had in fact been discharged for consumption on April 2, 1862, at Annapolis, Maryland.

After his discharge from the army Henry returned to Michigan, probably to his home in Clinton County. In any case, he reentered the service as a Private in Company E, Thirtieth Michigan infantry on December 6, 1864, at Lansing for one year, crediting Westphalia, Clinton County, and was mustered on January 4, 1865, at Detroit. The regiment was organized for 12 months’ service and was mustered into service on January 9. It was engaged in frontier duty along the Detroit and St. Clair Rivers until June. Henry was mustered out with the regiment at Detroit on June 30, 1865.

After the war Henry eventually returned to his home in Clinton County. By 1870 he was working as a farmer (he owned some $1200 worth of real estate) and living with his wife and two children in Riley next door to the Andrews Daniels family; they were the parents of Asa who had also served in the Old Third. He was living in Watertown in 1880, in Wacousta, Clinton County in 1883, in 1888, and in December of 1890 when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association and either in Wacousta or Watertown in 1894.

Henry may have been living on R.R. no. 7 in Detroit around 1900, but had returned to Clinton County by 1911 when he was living in Dewitt. He possibly resided in Watertown for a time as well as South Riley. By 1920 he and Hanna were living in Oneida, Clinton County.

Henry was a member of Grand Army of the Republic Joseph Mason Post No. 248 in Wacousta, and received pension no. 30,249, drawing $4.00 per month in 1883.

Henry died on November 24, 1924, in either Watertown or Wacousta and was buried in Wacousta cemetery: old section, lot no. 185.

In 1925 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 960800).

Lawrence Croy

Lawrence Croy was born September 13, 1839, in Coshoctan County, Ohio, the son of Jacob (1811-1886) and Mary Ann (Schults, b. 1818)

Lawrence’s parents were both born in Ohio and were probably married there sometime before 1837. In any case the family was living in Washington, Coshocton County, Ohio in 1850 and resided in Ohio for some years before emigrating westward. Jacob eventually settled his family in Lansing, Ingham County, and by 1860 Lawrence was working as a day laborer along with his father and older brother Philip and living with his family in Lansing’s First Ward.

Lawrence stood 5’6” with blue eyes, sandy hair and a light complexion, and was a 21-year-old laborer probably living in Lansing's First Ward when he enlisted in Company G on May 13, 1861. (Company G, formerly the “Williams’ Rifles”, was made up predominantly of men from the Lansing area.) He was wounded severely in the leg on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, and in early June was among the wounded reported to be in a Washington hospital; although Homer Thayer of Company G wrote on June 20 that Croy was in fact a patient in the State Hospital at New Haven, Connecticut. In any case, he remained hospitalized from July of 1862 through January of 1863, and was discharged on February 13, 1863, at New Haven, Connecticut for “deformity of the left leg in consequence of fracture of the femur from wound received in action.”

After his discharge from the army Lawrence returned to Michigan where he reentered the service in Company B, Third Michigan cavalry in early spring of 1864, crediting Dewitt, Clinton County, and joined the Regiment in March, possibly at Little Rock, Arkansas. In May Lawrence was reported on furlough, possibly as a consequence of being ill although this is by no means certain. In any case he was discharged for disability on July 10, 1864, at Devall’s Bluff, Arkansas.

Lawrence listed Grand Rapids on his discharge paper as his mailing address but he would eventually return to Lansing, where he lived for some fifty years, working as a laborer.

He married Ohio native Mary J. Elder (b. 1848-1872), on June 15, 1863 in Dewitt, Clinton County, Michigan or in Macomb, Ohio, and they had at least four children: John (b. 1867), Ira Jacob, (b. 1868), Virgel (b. 1871) and one other.

The family lived in Macomb, Ohio for several months before moving to Toledo where they remained for “some time”, Lawrence eventually brought his family to Lansing, Ingham County, Michigan. By 1870 he was working as an engineer and living with his wife in Lansing’s Third Ward. After Mary died in Lansing in 1872, Lawrence placed his son John in the care of a man named Wrath, and another son Ira went to live with his grandmother. Lawrence married his second wife, a woman named Agnes “Belle” Kramer, at which time, according to John and Ira, they returned to his father’s home. Lawrence and Belle had at least one child: Mary Ann. They were separated and subsequently divorced (she eventually married a man named Brooks).

In fact, in June of 1875 “Belle” sued Lawrence for divorce, on the grounds of cruelty and adultery.

The divorce was granted and Lawrence was ordered to pay $5 per week alimony and child support.

On June 15, 1878 Lawrence married his third wife, Margaret Cinderella “Cinda” Fletcher (1858?-1910), in Findaly, Hancock County, Ohio, and they had at least three children: Jesse or Jessie (b. 1886) Wesley (b. 1887) and Thornton (b. 1890).

Lawrence had a total of eight children by his three wives. Other children’s names were: Bert and Mrs. Wayne Gregory.

In his last years he was residing at 444 Grand Street, (North) Lansing.

Lawrence became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association in June of 1904, and in July of 1889 joined the Grand Army of the Republic Foster Post No. 42 in Lansing.

In 1863 (?) He applied for and received a pension (no. 16337), drawing $30 per month by 1907.

Lawrence died of paralysis and a “general breaking down” on April 5, 1908, at his home at 412 Lapeer Street, Lansing. One obituary reported “For the last four weeks, the flag on the hall of Charles T. Foster post Grand Army of the Republic has been half mast for some member of the order. The flag was again placed in that position for Lawrence W. Croy who passed away last night. . . . He had resided in Lansing for 50 years.” The funeral was held on April 9 at his home at 2:00 p.m., under the auspices of the GAR. He was buried in Mt. Hope cemetery in Lansing: section B, lot 229, grave 7.

In 1908 his widow Cinda applied for and received a pension (no. 665,696).

Corwin Samuel Cross

Corwin Samuel Cross was born January 22, 1841 in Mt. Eaton, Wayne County, Ohio, the son of Henderson H. (1809-1876) and Sarah F (1815-1900).

Both New Yorkers, Corwin’s parents were married in September of 1832 in Trenton, New Jersey. Sometime between 1833 and 1836 the family moved westward, settling for a time in Ohio, and by 1850 Henderson was working as a millwright in Lagrange, Lorain County, Ohio and Corwin was attending school with his siblings. Henderson eventually moved his family to Michigan and by 1860 had settled on a farm in Hastings, Barry County (Corwin is not reported to be living with his family at the time).

Corwin stood 5’1” with blue eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion and was a 21-year-old farmer probably living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company E on March 2 or 4, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered March 21 at Brandy Station, Virginia. He was reported missing in action on June 30, July 1 or 2, 1862, at White Oak Swamp, Virginia, and in fact had been taken prisoner at either Malvern Hill or White Oak Swamp. He was confined at Richmond, Virginia, paroled on August 5 at Aiken’s Landing, Virginia, subsequently returned to the Regiment but was absent sick from August 10 through August 31, 1863.

Although he was reported present for duty in September and October, according to Andrew Kilpatrick, also of Company E, he returned from the hospital on October 8, 1863. In any case, Corwin was reportedly absent on a 35-day furlough in November and December and had returned to the Regiment by January of 1864.

Corwin remained present for duty through February and reenlisted on either February 22 or March 21, 1864, at Brandy Station, Virginia, and was presumably absent on a 30 days’ veterans’ furlough. He probably came back to his family home in Michigan, and if so, probably returned to the Regiment in late March or April. Corwin was again reported missing in action on May 12, 1864, at Spotsylvania, Virginia, and in fact had been taken prisoner on May 12. He was transferred as a prisoner-of-war to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864.

Corwin died of disease in Libby prison at Richmond, Virginia, probably on September 29, 1864, and was interred just outside Oakwood cemetery in Richmond, “on top of the hill”; he was also reported to have been reinterred in Richmond National Cemetery: original division I, section B, no. 166.

In 1870 his parents were living in Grand Rapids’ Fourth Ward where his father worked as a millwright. His mother received a pension (no. 354160) and was living in Grand Rapids when she died in 1900.

Jesse I. Crapo

Jesse I. Crapo, also known as “Krapo”, was born 1844 in Bloomville, Seneca County, Ohio, the son of David (b. 1808-1879) and Mercy or Maria (Sowle or Soule 1810-1886).

Jesse’s parents were married October 9, 1831, in Dartmouth, Bristol County, Massachusetts (where both had been born) and by 1836 had settled in Bloomville or Bloom, Seneca County, Ohio, where they lived for more than a dozen years. Sometime after 1848 the family left Ohio and eventually settled in Michigan. By 1860 Jesse was working as a farm hand and living with his family on a large farm in Odessa, Ionia County.

He stood 5’10” with gray eyes, dark hair and a light complexion, and was an 18-year-old farmer living in Odessa, Ionia County when he enlisted in Company E on March 11, 1862, at Saranac, Ionia County for 3 years, and was mustered the same day. He was sick with typhoid fever in the hospital at Bottom’s Bridge, Virginia in June of 1862, and in fact he died of typhoid fever at either Fair Oaks or Savage Station, Virginia, on June 17, 1862. He was presumably buried near Fair Oaks or Savage Station.

By 1870 his parents were still living on a farm in South Cass, Odessa Township, Ionia County. In 1885 his mother applied for a pension (application no. 326,826) but the certificate was apparently never granted.

George M. Cook

George M. Cook was born around 1839 in Lorain County, Ohio.

George left Ohio and settled in Michigan where by 1860 he was a farm laborer working for and/or living with Watson Cronkite in Watertown, Clinton County. (Living nearby in Watertown was Ephraim Cook, born around 1823 in New York, and his wife Clarissa and family. They had probably moved to Michigan from Ohio, where they resided for some years, sometime after 1858. Also living with Ephraim and his family was probably his mother Polly, born around 1803 in New York. Living just one farm away form George was the Butterfield family; originally from New York they had settled in Michigan sometime after 1843, and their daughter Adelaide would marry George in 1868.)

George stood 6’2” with blue eyes, black hair and a dark complexion, and was 23 years old and still residing in Clinton County when he enlisted as Fifth Sergeant in Company G on May 10, 1861. According to Corporal Joseph Stevens of Company G, George was the “comic singer” of the company, and he also reported that George was apparently sick, presumably in his quarters, in late May of 1861, while the Regiment was forming in Grand Rapids. “It is a wonder there are no more,” noted Stevens, “when we consider the cold and rainy weather for the past week.” In any case George remained sick through May and on into early June.

Frank Siverd, also of Company G, wrote home to the Lansing Republican in early June that George was sick with the measles. He was however, “well cared for." Siverd quickly pointed out that Regimental Surgeon D. W. "Bliss leaves nothing undone that will contribute to the comfort of the sick. To prevent the disease spreading, as soon as the first symptoms appear,” Bliss had Cook, along with several others “removed to the house of a physician, some three miles from camp.”

George eventually recovered from his bout with “measles” and left Michigan with the regiment on June 13, 1861. But it appears that he never fully recovered from his first bout with measles, and was absent sick in the hospital from October of 1862 through December. In fact, according to First Lieutenant Joseph Mason, commanding Company G in February of 1863, “since the time he joined the Regiment he has been subject to sudden attacks of palpitation of the heart & when he had to make the slightest exertion fainting fits ensued.”

George was discharged on February 10, 1863, at Camp Pitcher, Virginia, by Regimental surgeon James Grove for “chronic valvular disease of the heart, the result in my opinion of acute rheumatism of which he states he had one or two attacks before entering the service.” On March 27, 1863, Homer Thayer of Company G wrote that Sergeant Cook along with several others had recently been discharged.

After his discharge in the spring of 1863 George returned to Michigan where he reentered the service as Sergeant in Company F, Twenty-eighth Michigan infantry on August 23, 1864, at Lansing for 3 years, crediting Lansing's Second Ward, and was mustered on August 25 at Marshall, Calhoun County where the regiment was being organized. The regiment left Michigan for Louisville, Kentucky October 26-29 and remained on duty there until November 10. It participated in the battle of Nashville and subsequently occupied Nashville.

In November George was reported as a mounted scout, and in January of 1865 he was absent sick through February, and in March was in a hospital in Alexandria, Louisiana, since February 8. In fact the Twenty-eighth had moved back to Louisville in mid-January and on January 18 was moved to Alexandria, Louisiana where it remained until February 19. The regiment was eventually transferred to New Berne, North Carolina in late February of 1865. It participated in the campaign in the Carolinas from March 1-April 26, the advance on and occupation of Raleigh, North Carolina in mid-April, the surrender of Johnston’s army and subsequently on duty at Raleigh until August. George was mustered out of service on June 5, 1865 at Raleigh, North Carolina.

After the war George eventually returned to Michigan, possibly to Clinton County.

He was probably living in Clinton County when he married Michigan native Adelaide M. Butterfield (b. 1845) on March 29, 1868, in Clinton County. They had at least one child: a daughter Glen Cora (b. 1869).

By 1870 George was working as a farmer and living with his wife and daughter, and probably Adelaide’s younger sister Ida (b. 1858) in Watertown, Clinton County; next door lived Ephraim Cook and his family as well as Polly Cook, and next door to Ephraim lived Mrs. Cronkite, a widow.

George was working as a laborer when he probably died of an "abscess" in Kalamazoo County, on January 13, 1878, and his body was returned to Clinton County, where he was buried in Dewitt cemetery in Clinton County: section C lot 106 (on the same lot with Julius and Jennie Jardot).

No pension seems to be available.

By 1880 Adelaide was working as a milliner and dress-maker and living as head of the household in Watertown; living with her was her daughter and sister Ida who was also working as a dress-maker.

Daniel Gilbert Converse Jr.

Daniel Gilbert Converse Jr. was born 1837, in Parkman or Parkmanville, Geauga County, Ohio, the son of Daniel G. Sr. (1790-1858) and Thankful (Carter, 1797-1869).

Vermont native Daniel Sr. served as a Sergeant in the Second (Fifield’s) Regiment of Vermont infantry in the war of 1812, He was probably living in Vermont when he married Polly Morgan in 1813, and in Randolph, Orange County, Vermont, in 1820. Daniel Sr. was either widowed or divorced when he married Vermont-born Thankful Carter in 1826, possibly in Vermont. In any case, Daniel Sr. settled his family in Parkmanville, Geuga County, Ohio, around 1829 and farmed there for many years; he was living in Parkmanville in 1830, 1840 and 1850. In 1850 Daniel Sr. and his family lived next door to one John Convers and his family, a miller in Parkmanville; John was born in about 1793 in Vermont and was probably Daniel’s brother. In any case, Daniel Jr. was attending school with three of his siblings in 1850. Daniel Sr. served several times as Justice of the Peace and was deacon of the Congregational Church.

In 1855 Daniel Sr. moved his family from Ohio to western Michigan settling in Saranac, Ionia County where he died in 1858. In July of 1857 one Daniel G. Converse bought 40 acres of land through the land office in Ionia County, Michigan.

Daniel Jr. was living in Ionia County when he joined the “Boston Light Guard," a local militia company in western Ionia County, on January 22, 1858. According to one contemporary source he was Second Corporal of the Boston Light Guard, which would serve as the nucleus for Company D, Third Michigan Infantry in 1861.

On April 14, 1858, Daniel Jr. married Ohio native Emma A Chipman (b. 1841), who had been married once before to one Edgar B. Smith, probably in Ohio, and they had at least one child, a daughter, Hester Louise. (Emma was probably the daughter of Ami and Ruth Chipman and was probably living with her family in Boston, Ionia County, Michigan in 1850.)

By 1860 Daniel Jr. was a farmer living with his wife Emma in Berlin (Saranac), Ionia County; also living with them was one Oliver Converse, age 42 and born in Vermont and one Charles Patten, age 6 and born in Ohio who was attending school in Saranac.

Daniel stood 5’9” with gray eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was 24 years old and still living in Ionia County when he enlisted at the age of 24 in Company D on May 13, 1861. (Company D was composed in large part of men who came from western Ionia County and Eaton County.)

He was reported missing in action at Savage Station, Virginia, on July 1, 1862, and had, in fact, been taken prisoner, possibly while sick in the hospital. He was soon paroled at Richmond, Virginia, and arrived at Old Point, Virginia, near Fortress Monroe, on the steamer John Tucker, on the afternoon of July 11. In late August he was reported among the paroled prisoner-of-war at Camp Parole, at Annapolis, Maryland.

By November 20, 1862, Daniel had returned to the Regiment where he was promoted to Sergeant Major, and in May of 1863 he was absent sick. He was again absent sick in October and November. By December he was detached on recruiting service in Michigan where he remained through March of 1864. He reenlisted on February 26, 1864, while in Grand Rapids.

Although in April of 1864 Daniel was still on recruiting service in Michigan, nevertheless he was promoted to First Lieutenant of Company H on April 1, 1864, at Brandy Station, Virginia, replacing Lieutenant Calvin McTaggert. He was transferred to Company F on May 5, 1864, and then transferred as First Lieutenant to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. In July he was promoted to Captain and assigned to Company A on July 30, commissioned as of June 13, replacing Captain Daniel Root, who had been promoted to Major.

In September Daniel was absent sick, but was soon back with his company by October, and on leave in November. He was present for duty in December of 1864, and in February of 1865 he was on recruiting service in Detroit through May. He returned to the regiment from recruiting service on June 8, at least on paper; in fact he may never have left Michigan. In any case, he was mustered out of service with the regiment on July 5, 1865 at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

Curiously, no pension seems to be available and there appears to be no further record of either Daniel or his wife Emma.

Albert Morris Cole UPDATE 13 July 2018

Albert Morris Cole was born on July 10, 1842, in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, the son of Ezra Cole (b. 1807) and Pennsylvania native Julia Ann Howe or Horn (1825-1889) or Rebecca Alma Nelson. 

Ezra and Julia (?) were reportedly married in April of 1840 in Marion, Ohio, and resided in Ohio for some years. Ezra may have been living in Scott, Marion County, Ohio in 1840. Ezra possibly died in Ohio or perhaps in Indiana. By 1850 Julia and her children were residing with a gunsmith named Oliver Barker and his family in Prairie, Kosciusko County, Indiana, where Albert attended school with his older sister Amanda and Elijah Barker. Sometime around 1859 or early 1860 Julia married Charles Ostrander and by 1860 she was residing with her new husband at a boardinghouse in Norton, Muskegon County.

Albert was a 19-year-old laborer living in Muskegon County when he enlisted with his parent’s consent in Company H on May 13, 1861. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.) He was reported as a company cook in August of 1862, and was discharged on January 3, 1863, in order to enlist in Battery F or Battery K, 3rd United States Artillery.  Albert was mustered out on February 4, 1866. 

Albert returned to Michigan and was a farm laborer living in Riverton, Mason County in 1880 with his younger brother Francis M. and his wife and two children. (His mother Julia was also living in Riverton in 1880 working as a dressmaker. Her 12-year-old son George was living with her as well. While living in Mason County Julia married a farmer named Elias Taylor and they eventually settled on a homestead in Redington, Nebraska.) 

By 1890 Albert was living in Pentwater, Oceana County. He was living in Riverton in 1900 and working as a farmer; also living with him in 1900 was his nephew Clifford Cole. By 1920 he was living alone in Freesoil, Mason County.

In 1894 Albert applied for and received a pension no 999308 for his service in the 3rd Michigan infantry and the U.S. artillery.

Albert died of heart disease in Freesoil on August 14, 1922, and was buried in Tallman cemetery in Freesoil: lot no. 17. (Also buried in the same plot is his nephew Alphonso A. Cole, 1881-1935, Alphonso’s wife Alice A, 1881-1957 and their daughter Ellen, d. 1913.)

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George Cochran

George Cochran also known as “Cochrane”, was born around 1841 in Erie County, Ohio.

George was possibly residing with a Judge Farwell and his family in Portland, Erie County, Ohio in 1850. In any case he left Ohio and eventually settled in western Michigan.

He stood 5’5” with gray eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was a 21-year-old farmer living in Mecosta County when he enlisted in Company K on January 31, 1862 at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered the same day.

George was wounded on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, and subsequently died in the field on August 31, 1862, from his wounds. He was presumably buried among the unknown soldiers whose remains were reinterred in Arlington National Cemetery.

No pension seems to be available.