Soldiers' Home NaCem

William S. Wright

William S. Wright was born in 1844.

William, also known as “Lightning,” was 17 years old and probably living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted with his parents’ consent in Company A on May 13, 1861.

He was wounded severely in the arm on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, and subsequently hospitalized, probably in Washington, DC, where he died of his wounds on June 24 at Judiciary Square hospital. He was buried on June 25, 1862, in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldier's Home National cemetery).

No pension seems to be available.

Edward Watson

Edward Watson was born in 1840, possibly in Michigan and possibly the son of Dustin (1811-1850) and Sarah (b. 1820).

In 1840 there was a Dustin Watson living in Martin, Allegan County, Michigan. He was probably the same Dustin Watson who purchased 40 acres of land at the Ionia land Office in Michigan in 1849. Vermont native Dustin Watson died of consumption in Ottawa County in March of 1850; that same year one Edmond Watson, age 6 was living with his mother (?) Pennsylvania native Sarah and older sister Michigan-born Helen with the Cissler brothers in Crockery, Ottawa County. (One of the brothers had been born in Pennsylvania.)

In any case, Edward (or “Edmon” or “Edmund”) was 21 years old and possibly living in Polkton, Ottawa County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company I on May 13, 1861. (Company I was made up largely of men from Ottawa County, particularly from the eastern side of the County.)

He was admitted to Union Hotel hospital in Washington, DC, on August 20, 1861, suffering from intermittent fever, and he died of paralysis of his left side on September 16, 1861, at the Union Hotel hospital. Edward was buried in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldier's Home National cemetery).

In February of 1877 Edmund’s half-brother John B. Magers, applied for and received a “brother’s” pension (no. 244819).

Ira G. Turner

Ira G. Turner was born in 1833.

In 1840 there was one Ira G. Turner living in Ellery, Chautauqua County, New York and in 1840 and 1845 there was an Ira Turner residing in Eaton and Tyler Townships, Eaton County, Michigan, respectively.

Ira was 28 years old and possibly living in Lansing or Ionia County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company B on May 13, 1861.

He died of typhoid fever on November 28, 1861, at Columbian College hospital, Washington, DC, and was buried in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldier's Home National cemetery).

No pension seems to be available.

Ira Spear Todd

Ira Spear Todd was born on January 28, 1842, in Rome, Lenawee County, Michigan, the son of Alanson (1822-1875) and Hester Maria (Frary, 1822-1860).

According to one source Ira’s parents were married in Rome, Michigan, on July 2, 1840, and by 1843 the family had moved to Van Buren County and were residing in Bengal, Clinton County in 1850 and in Gratiot County by 1858. (The census records for this period do not substantiate this however.)

Ira (who was possibly named after his maternal grandfather, Ira Spear Frary) was 19 years old and probably living in Portland, Ionia County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861. (Company D was composed in large part of men who came from western Ionia County and Eaton County.)

He died of typhoid fever on August 29 or September 1, 1861, at either Union Hotel hospital or Columbian College hospital in Washington, DC, and was buried in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldier's Home National cemetery).

No pension seems to be available.

Frederick Tate

Frederick Tate was born in 1828, in England or in Massachusetts.

Frederick was probably living in Rhode Island when he married Rhode Island native Charlotte E. Hadley (1817-1906) on August 4, 1849, in Providence, and they had at least one child, a daughter Jennie L. (1850-1920), who may have been either physically handicapped or mentally ill.

By 1850 Fred was working in a factory and living with his wife Charlotte in Providence, Rhode Island. Next door lived one Andrew Tate, who had been born in 1820 in Massachussetts. Fred left Rhode Island, probably by himself, and eventually settled in western Michigan by 1860 when he was working as a lumberman and shingle-maker living with and/or working for William Woodruff, a farmer in Blendon, Ottawa County. (Curiously there were four Tate brothers also living in Ottawa County who would join Company I along with Fred; three of them had also been born in Massachussets.)

Although he listed his place of residence during the war as Providence, Rhode Island (his wife remained in Rhode Island during this period), Fred was 33 years old and probably working in Georgetown, Ottawa County when he enlisted in Company I on May 13, 1861.

Fred was absent sick in the hospital in August of 1862, probably suffering from typhoid fever, and according to the testimony of Captain Thomas Tate of Company I, Frederick contracted the disease “in the field in the following manner. While the company to which he belonged was lying before Richmond he was attacked with diarrhea and chill fever, caused by exposure and over exertion and on the arrival of the Regiment at Alexandria, Va., en route to join Gen. Pope, he was sent to the gen. hospital at Washington, DC.”

On August 25, 1862, Fred was admitted to Emory hospital, Washington, DC where he died of typhoid fever on August 31, 1862, and was buried in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldier's Home National cemetery), probably in section C no. 3256. If so he was mistakenly listed as “William” Tate.

His widow, who was living in Providence, applied for and received pension no. 31,087, dated March of 1864. Subsequently a pension was also filed on behalf of and approved for a “helpless child”(no. 824,774), dated March of 1917. From 1890 to 1892 Charlotte was living at 2 Olney in Providence, working at machine stitching.

John Sweeny

John Sweeny was born in 1836.

John was married to Emily, probably sometime before the war broke out.

He was 25 years and old and possibly living in Muskegon County when he enlisted in Company H on May 6, 1861. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.) He was shot on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, admitted to Judiciary Square hospital in Washington, DC on June 4, where he died from his wounds on June 7, 1862, and was buried on June 8 in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldier's Home National cemetery), section C no. 2529.

In 1866 Emily applied for and received a pension (no. 90975).

John S. Smith

John S. Smith was born in 1840.

John was 20 years old and probably living in Muskegon County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company H on May 13, 1861 (or perhaps as early as April 28, 1861). (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.)

He was wounded on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, and admitted to Armory Square hospital in Washington, DC, on September 3, where he died from “vulnus sclopeticum” (gunshot wound) on September 23. John was buried in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldier's Home National cemetery), section F no. 526.

In 1875 John’s mother applied for and received a pension (no. 172648)

Alexander Ross

Alexander Ross was born in 1840.

Alexander was 21 years old and living in Bath, Clinton County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company G on May 10, 1861. He was wounded severely in the groin on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia. By mid-June he was hospitalized in Portsmouth, Virginia, and apparently returned to duty soon afterwards. Homer Thayer of Company G reported on September 2 that that Ross had been wounded slightly at Second Bull Run on August 29, 1862.

Slight or not, he was subsequently hospitalized in Washington, DC, and died from a wound to the ankle on September 26, 1862, at Presbyterian hospital in Georgetown, DC. He was buried in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldier's Home National cemetery), section F no. 848.

No pension seems to be available.

Charles Rose

Charles Rose was born in 1837 in Orleans County, New York, possibly the son of Jeremiah and Susan.

Charles left New York, probably with his family, and moved west, eventually settling in Brookfield, Waukesha County, Wisconsin by 1850 where they resided for some years.

Charles stood 5’6” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was 24 years old and probably working as a farmer in Brookfield, Wisconsin (although he gave Ingham County as his home of record) when he enlisted in Company H on April 28, 1861. He may have been wounded on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, but in any event was sick in the hospital from August of 1862 through October.

He was discharged for consumption on October 30, 1862, at Finley hospital in Washington, DC, and subsequently died of typhoid fever on November 10, 1862, in hospital no. 104 (possibly Finley hospital) in Washington. He was buried in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldier's Home National cemetery), probably in section D, no. 4662, as “Charles Rohs”.

No pension seems to be available.

According to a letter in his Military Service Record, National Archives, dated August 25, 1863, the hospital chaplain had taken possession of Charles’ personal effects and reportedly sent them home to one Susan Rose, “widdow of Jeremiah Rose.” She was living in Duplainville, Clinton County in August of 1863.

Jacob S. Pickle

Jacob S. Pickle was born in 1835 in New York.

Jacob left New York and had settled in western Michigan by the time the war had broken out, and possibly even earlier.

(By 1860 there was one John Pickle, age 25, born in New York, married to Elizabeth and with one child living in Rutland, Barry County. There there was also a Jacob Pickle, age 32, born in New York, and married to Martha and with three children living in Monroe County. Both men were born in New York, and were possibly related to one J. M. Pickle, age 50, from New York, and Robert Pickle, both living in Hastings in 1860.)

Jacob was probably working as a farmer in Hastings, Barry County when he enlisted in the Hastings Rifle Company in April of 1861. The company was disbanded shortly after it arrived in Grand Rapids and its members distributed to other companies of the Third Michigan infantry then forming at Cantonment Anderson just south of the city, and Jacob eventually enlisted at the age of 26 in Company K on May 13, 1861.

Jacob died of typhoid fever on September 8, 9 or 17, 1861, at Seminary hospital, Georgetown, DC, and was buried in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldier's Home National cemetery), section B, grave no. 1451.

No pension seems to be available.

William C. Pealsch

William C. Pealsch was born in 1831.

William was 30 years old and probably living in Muskegon County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company C. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.)

He was admitted on December 31, 1862, to Carver hospital, Washington, DC, where he died of chronic diarrhea in ward 36 on January 28, 1863. William was buried at 9:00 a.m. the following day in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldier's Home National cemetery), section G no. 4961 listed as “William Peulsh.”

No pension seems to be available.

Edwin C. Hurlbut

Edwin C. Hurlbut was born in 1838 or 1840 in Bridgewater, Washtenaw County, Michigan, probably the son of Eli (b. 1803) and Amelia (b. 1806)

Both New York natives, Eli and Amelia were married sometime before 1838 when they were living in Michigan. By 1850 Edwin was living on the family farm in Manchester, Washtenaw County.

Edwin stood 5’8” with blue eyes, brown hair and a florid complexion, and was a 21-year-old farmer possibly living in Chester, Ottawa County or Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company K on August 12, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years.

He joined the Regiment on September 8 at Upton’s Hill, Virginia, and was absent sick in the general hospital from December of 1862 until he died of typhoid fever on January 3, 1863, at Carver hospital in Washington, DC. He was buried in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldier's Home National cemetery).

No pension seems to be available.

August H. Gerths

August H. Gerths, also known as “Gerlhs,” was born 1841 in Holstein, Germany.

August left Germany and immigrated to America sometime before the war broke out, eventually settling in western Michigan. (By 1860 there was a 10-year-old girl named Caroline Gerths, born in Holstein, living with 32-year-old Catharine and her husband Peter Boos; Catharine had also been born in Holstein.)

He was 20 years old and probably living in Muskegon County when he enlisted with the consent of the Justice of the Peace in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.) He was sick in the Regimental hospital in July of 1862, and admitted to a general hospital in Washington, DC, on October 14, 1862, suffering from chronic rheumatism.

August died of “chronic diarrhea” on December 9, 1862, in ward 1, bed 53, at the Patent Office hospital in Washington, DC, and was buried the same day in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldier's Home National cemetery), Washington: section H no. 3876.

No pension seems to be available.

William Furgeson

William Furgeson, also known as “Ferguson,” was born 1828 in Pennsylvania.

William left Pennsylvania and moved west, eventually settling in Muskegon, Muskegon County, Michigan, where by 1860 he was working as a day laborer and living at the Pratt boarding house.

William was 33 years old and probably still living in Muskegon when he enlisted in Company H on May 13, 1861. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.) He was shot in the leg at Second Bull Run, on August 29, 1862, and subsequently sent to Judiciary Square hospital in Washington, DC, where he died of his wounds on September 19, 1862. William was buried the same day in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldier's Home National cemetery), Washington.

No pension seems to be available.

Isaac Francis

Isaac Francis was born 1840 in Michigan.

In 1840 there was one Isaac F. Francis living in York, Washtenaw County, Michigan. In 1860 there was one Irene or Irame Francis (b. 1803 in Vermont) and one Lucinda (b. 1820 in Ohio) living together in York, Washtenaw County. By 1860 Isaac was a farm laborer working for and/or living with Daniel Tower in Courtland, Kent County. (Curiously, next door to Irene in York was the family of Henry Tower.)

Isaac was 21 years old and probably living in Lowell, Kent County when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861. He was wounded in one of his arms on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, and subsequently suffered the amputation of the limb.

Isaac died of vulnus sclopeticum (wounds) on September 8 or 11, 1862, at Armory Square hospital in Washington, DC. He was buried in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldier's Home National cemetery) in Washington.

No pension seems to be available.

George Ellis

George Ellis was born 1839 in England.

George left England in the late 1850s and immigrated to the United States, eventually settling in central Michigan. By 1860 George was working as a day laborer and living at the Butterfield Hotel in Lansing’s First Ward. In early 1861 he was probably still residing in Lansing when he was reported as a member of the Lansing militia company called the “Williams’ Rifles”, whose members would serve as the nucleus of Company G.

George was 22 years old and still living in Lansing when he enlisted as Third Sergeant in Company G on May 10, 1861; he may have been related to Eugene Ellis. By June of 1862 George was Orderly Sergeant for the company, and he was shot in the hip on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run. On September 2 Homer Thayer of Company G wrote that Ellis had been wounded in the hip and Thayer thought it “probably mortal.”

In fact, George died as a result of his wounds on September 2, at Washington, DC, and was buried on September 3 in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldier's Home National cemetery), section C no. 3255 (see photo G-640).

No pension seems to be available.

James F. Drake

James F. Drake was born 1842 in Michigan, the son of Seth W. (1815-1864) and Mary (b. 1820).

Seth and Mary were both from New York and married on January 31, 1838 in Phelps, Ontario County, New York. Seth eventually moved his family west and settled in Michigan by 1850 when he was working as a farmer and living with his family in Eagle, Clinton County, Michigan where James attended school. In 1860 James was working as a laborer and living with his family in Eagle where his father still worked as a farmer.

James was 20 years old and residing in Portland, Ionia County when he enlisted with his parents’ consent in Company E on May 13, 1861. He was wounded in the leg on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run. He was reported missing in action in early September but in fact he had been admitted to Cliffburne hospital in Washington, DC, where he suffered the amputation of the upper third of one of his thighs. He died of vulnus sclopeticum (wounds) on September 13 at Cliffburne hospital, and was buried in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldier's Home National cemetery).

James’s father Seth enlisted in 1864 in the Twenty-third Michigan infantry. He was wounded in May and died at Chattanooga, Tennessee in June of 1864 and was buried in Chattanooga National Cemetery: section D., 12462.

In August of 1864 Mary was living in Eagle, Clinton County when she applied for and received a pension (no. 49155).

Samuel B. Cook - update 8/21/2016

Samuel B. Cook, also known as “Willard S. Cook”, was born 1837 in Orleans County, New York, the son of Levi (b. 1805) and Susan (b. 1806).

Massachusetts native Levi married Vermonter Susan in 1824 and they eventually settled in New York. Sometime after 1847 the family left New York and moved to Michigan. By 1860 Levi had settled on a farm in Carlton, Barry County, where Samuel was living with his family and working as a farm laborer for Wilson Odell, a farmer in Carlton.

Samuel stood 6’2” with blue eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion, and was 24 years old and still living in Barry County when he enlisted in the Hastings Rifle Company in April of 1861. The company was disbanded shortly after it arrived in Grand Rapids and its members distributed to other companies of the Third Michigan infantry then forming at Cantonment Anderson just south of the city, and Samuel eventually enlisted in Company E on May 13, 1861.

On September 17, 1861, Samuel was in a hospital in Washington, DC, when he wrote home to his “Dear sister Susan,”

I now write a few lines to you to let you know that I have not forgot you and the reason why I have not written to you before is that I have felt so miserable that it has been hard work for me to write at all. I have got a very lame side and hip and perhaps it will be a long time before it gets so that I can be with my boys. For six weeks I have suffered every thing and yet I live in hopes of being able to do my duty to my country, which it needs so much. When you and Jacob has your good times think of me and say he is suffering for his country, and he is willing to suffer for his Native Land and its noble flag. Tell Mary and Daniel that I am . . . unable to do anything that I have not forgot them although I have suffered everything and now I am deprived of talking. I have not spoke a word in over two weeks. There have four doctors been doctoring me and they have not helped me any yet. Write to me as soon as you get this and direct your letter to Union hospital [on Washington Street in] Georgetown DC. I hope these few lines will find you in good health and I hope when I hear from you I shall be well. So good bye for this time from your brother.

That same day he also wrote to his sister Esther, “I thought that I would write a few lines to you to let you know that I received your letter and was glad to hear from you but I am sorry to say that it found me in very poor health and not only in poor health but that I couldn’t talk or can’t yet. The captain brought it to me when he came to see me and one from Dolley Coin [?]. You must be a good girl and when I get well I will send you something. . . . Tell father to take good care of the steers. So good-by this time, from your brother.”

Samuel was discharged on September 23, 1861 at Arlington, Virginia for “chronic bronchitis accompanied with complete paralysis of the vocal chords” (aphonia).

Samuel eventually returned to Barry County and was living in Carlton in 1862 when, under the name of “Willard S. Cook” he apparently enlisted on July 26, in Company C, Twentieth Michigan infantry, at Battle Creek, Michigan, for three years, and he was probably sworn into federal service along with the rest of the Twentieth Michigan on August 16, 1862, at Jackson, Jackson County. While he was with the regiment in Jackson, Michigan, he wrote to his family on August 28, 1862.

Dear Parents, Sisters, I now take my pen in hand to write you a few lines to let you know that I am well and hope that these few lines will find you all the same. I have not time to come home but will send you my best love and respects. We have got marching orders and I think that we will be in Washington by the first of next week. I would like to come out there before I leave but there is no use of thinking any such things for I can’t get away tho most of our men have been home and came back. They say that if I go they can’t do anything. I would come if I was sure that we would not leave here next week but it is uncertain. I sent you my trunk this morning with a nice shawl [?] in it for mother. If it don’t suit her she can sell it for 8 dollars or what you think its worth. The price was six dollars. You must look to the express office . . . for the trunk and also twenty dollars in money that I have expressed there this morning. I would send more but I was gone and did not draw it [another pay day?]. I want you to do whatever you think best with it if you want it to use it if it an interest . . . shall not draw again under two months and then I will send you some more. I want you to do whatever you think best with it. I sent my likenesses all home because I can’t keep them here. Keep them for me until I send for them. I will write you again soon. I forgot to send the key to my trunk but the big trunk key will fit it if it don’t break it first. So good by for this time. I will write you again as soon as I know what we are doing.

The regiment left Michigan on September 1 and shortly afterwards arrive in Washington, DC, where it was attached to the Ninth Corps, of the Army of the Potomac.

Samuel along with the rest of the Twentieth Michigan apparently missed the action at Antietam and did not join its division in the Army of the Potomac until September 23 when it arrived on the battlefield. Five days later, from a bivouac along the Potomac some 18 miles from Washington, Samuel wrote to his parents.

Dear Parents, I now take my pen in hand to write you a few lines to let you know that I received your letter today. It is the first one that I have got direct from home. You can better imagine my feelings than I can tell them. Our mail came to us today for the first time since we left Washington. I received three, some did not get any. The boys said that [I] get more than my fair share but I don’t think so. I am very sorry I could not come home before we left the state but the prospect is that we will all be home in a few months. We will if they will only let us follow the enemy. A few battles more like the last one [Antietam] will be all they want and our men are anxious to meet them again. We can see their pickets from our lines. We are on one side of the river and they are on the other. I think that there is another movement on hand. One division of our army has moved down the river and the other lies in front of the rebels. I think that Sigle [Gen. Siegel] is coming up in their rear. If this is the case we will have them in a ____ before long. Perhaps before this reaches you we will give them another thrashing. If they will only let Burnside and Sigle [Siegel] lead us we will lick them every time. You asked me what I thought about buying some sheep. If you don’t want it for anything else it is the best thing that you can do but get young ones if you can. I sent it to you to use and do what you think best with it and it will suit me. I wrote Charles a letter today and you one yesterday so I can’t write much today. You must write as often as you can and I will do the same. . . . I will send you some more money as soon as I get my pay. They are owing me thirty-eight dollars. I am next to the Sergeant Major in rank. I will close for this time. So good by to you all.

Samuel had been promoted to Sergeant by October 29, 1862, when he was admitted to Carver general hospital in Washington, Dc, suffering from hemorrhoids. In fact he was much sicker.

On November 28, 1862, Samuel wrote a note – apparently to be left with his personal belongings – dated Carver hospital. “If any thing should happen that I should not live to go home it is my wish that all that is owed to me should go to my mother Mrs. Susan R. Cook. From her son W. S. Cook.”

Samuel died of chronic diarrhea, presumably at Carver hospital in Washington, DC, on December 12, 1862 and was reportedly buried in the Military Asylum Cemetery.

Both his parents and his widow applied for and received pensions: his widow in August of 1863 (pension no. 66,385), his mother in 1880 (no. 203977) and his father in 1885 (no. 215415).

By December of 1866 his widow was living in Charlotte, Eaton County, receiving $8 per month for Samuel’s service in the army. His parents were still living in Carlton in 1870 where Levi worked as a farm laborer.


Augustus Billings

Augustus Billings was born around 1841 or 1842, in New York, the son of J. D. (b. 1804) and Elizabeth (Todd, 1810-1888).

Connecticut native "J. D." and Massachusetts native Elizabeth settled in New York sometime after their marriage. The family moved from New York to Michigan sometime before 1850 (Augustus’ younger sister Mary was born in 1850 in Michigan) and by 1860 Augustus was living with his family in Lansing’s Second Ward where his father was a local merchant.

Augustus was 20 years old and possibly living in Clinton County or in Lansing when he enlisted on May 10, 1861, in Company G. (Company G, formerly the “Williams’ Rifles”, was made up predominantly of men from the Lansing area.) He was wounded by gunfire on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, and subsequently admitted as a single man to Douglas hospital (patient no. 882) in Washington, DC, where he died of his wounds on June 18, 1862. His funeral was held at 4:00 p.m. on June 18, attended by a military escort, and Augustus was buried in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldier's Home National cemetery), section C no. 3933.

No pension seems to be available for his service in the Third Michigan. (There is a pension reported for one Augustus T. Billings of Company E, Seventeenth Michigan infantry, no. 135,555, dated 1865).

Andrew and Martin Barber

Andrew Barber was born in 1840 in New York, the son of Robert (b. 1802) and Esther (b. 1808).

Robert was born in Ireland and Esther was born in Scotland. They eventually immigrated to the United States, and settled in New York state probably sometime in the late 1830s. By 1850 Andrew was living with Betsey Smith’s family in Verona, Oneida County, New York, just two houses from his parents. After spending some years in New York Robert moved his family westward and eventually moved to Michigan. By 1860 Andrew was working as a farm laborer and living with his family in Lowell, Kent County, Michigan. (Next door lived George C. Post who would also enlist in the Third Michigan.)

Andrew was 21 years old and living in Ionia County or in Lowell when he enlisted in Company D, on May 13, 1861; his brother Martin and another relative, Samuel Barber would also enlist in Company D . (Company D was composed in large part of men who came from western Ionia County and Eaton County.) Andrew was wounded in one of his legs on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, and admitted to Armory Square hospital, Washington, DC on September 1.

Sometime during the month of September Andrew suffered the amputation of his wounded leg, and he was probably still at Armory Square hospital when he died of vulnus sclopeticum (wounds) on September 22, 1862. He was buried in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldiers' Home National cemetery).

There appears to be no pension available.

In 1880 Robert and Esther were living in Lowell, Kent County, Michigan.

Martin Barber was born October 19, 1837, in Oneida County, New York.

His father Robert was born in Ireland and Esther was born in Scotland. They eventually immigrated to the United States, where they possibly met and married and settled in New York state probably sometime in the late 1830s. After spending some years in New York Robert moved his family westward and eventually moved to Michigan. By 1850 Martin was attending school and living with his family in Verona, Oneida County, New York. Robert eventually moved his family westward and settled in Lowell, Kent County, Michigan by 1860.

In any case Martin stood 5’8” with black eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion and was a 23-year-old farmer probably living in Ionia County when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861, along with his brother Andrew and another possible relative Samuel Barber, who was also from Ionia County. (Company D was composed in large part of men who came from western Ionia County and Eaton County.)

Martin was admitted to the general hospital at Newport News, Virginia, near Fort Monroe, on May 17, 1862, suffering from general debility and was transferred on June 12, presumably back to his regiment.

He was sick in the hospital in July of 1862, but had rejoined the Regiment by August when he was wounded in the left leg on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, and subsequently hospitalized at Emory general hospital in Washington, DC. He remained in the hospital until he was discharged for hemorrhoids at Camp Convalescent, near Alexandria, Virginia, on February 16, 1863.

After his discharge Martin returned to Michigan and settled in Lowell, Kent County.

He was married to Michigan native Martha E. Severy (1841-1907) on December 15, 1864, at Sturgis, St. Joseph County, and they had at least two children: Anna B. (1868-1891) and Louisa C. (b. 1877).

It is possible that they had a third daughter, Lulu, who was reportedly “seduced” at the age of 15 in 1888. On February 19, 1888, the Grand Rapids Democrat reported that one Sylvester Davis, was charged “with the seduction of a 15-year-old girl at Lowell, and who escaped from a deputy sheriff while hunting for bondsmen, has not yet been found and Deputy Sheriff Hill, whom he gave the slip, has offered $50 reward for his capture. His bonds are fixed in the sum of $1,000. The girl in the case is Lulu Barber, adopted daughter of M. C. Barber. The penalty under the new state law for his offense is 15 years in the penitentiary, as the girl is under 16, the legal age of consent.”

By 1880 Martin was working as a farmer and still living in Lowell, with his wife and two daughters. (In 1880 Robert and Esther were also living in Lowell, Kent County.) He was residing in Lowell in 1894 and indeed lived most of the his life in Lowell.

In 1880 Martin applied for and received pension no. 236,324, drawing $30 per month by June of 1905.

Martin was visiting or living in Detroit when he died of chronic bowel disease at about 10:00 a.m. on August 22, 1905, probably at 16 Hecla Avenue. His body was returned to Lowell where it was interred in Oakwood cemetery: old section no. 206; the headstone reads “Forever with the Lord”.

His widow was living in Detroit in September of 1905. She applied for and received a pension ( no. 599,657)