michigan

Michigan Monuments at Gettysburg

So, my wife and I were in Gettysburg recently and spent a morning tracking down all the memorials dedicated to Michigan units who fought at Gettysburg. All photos from May 2019.

(Steve Hawks has put together an incredibly comprehensive website that provides details of the Gettysburg memorials including inscriptions, locations and much more. The links below will take you to the relevant pages on the site.)

1st Michigan Infantry Located off Sickles Avenue in the Rose Woods loop; close to the 5th Michigan monument.

photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

3rd Michigan Infantry Located at the southeast edge of the Peach Orchard along Birney Avenue.

photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

4th Michigan Infantry Located on De Trobriand Avenue just before Sickles Avenue.

photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

5th Michigan Infantry Located on Sickles Avenue just before the loop in Rose Woods; close to the 1st Michigan monument.

photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

7th Michigan Infantry Located just west of Hancock Avenue and south of the "Copse of Trees."

photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

showing the “copse of trees,” the high water mark on the far right. photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

showing the “copse of trees,” the high water mark on the far right. photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

9th Michigan Battery The monument is along Hancock Avenue almost directly opposite the Pennsylvania memorial.

photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

16 Michigan Infantry Located about a third way down the front slope of Little Round and close to the Michigan Sharpshooters memorial. There is a path to the monument.

photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

24th Michigan Infantry Located just west of Gettysburg on Meredith Avenue.

photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

Michigan Cavalry Brigade Located in the East Cavalry Field on the eastern side of Route 15 and out of the normal flow of tourists to the park.

photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

detail, relief showing Brigade in action against confederate cavalry. photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

detail, relief showing Brigade in action against confederate cavalry. photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

Michigan Sharpshooters Located about half-way down the slope of Little Round Top and close to the 16th Michigan monument. The memorial is not accessible except by scrambling over rocks and through the underbrush; but the park asks you to remain on the paved path since they are presently restoring the landscape.

photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

photo © Steve Soper. All rights reserved.

3rd Michigan buried at Gettysburg PA

Of the 171 Michigan soldiers buried here 10 (not 11) were members of the 3rd Michigan Infantry; three errors are noted, however: Erson Smith was not killed but taken prisoner and died of his wounds in Richmond in September of 1863, Reuben Tower is listed incorrectly as Reuben "Power" and John M. Brown is incorrectly reported in the 3rd Michigan cavalry.

Charles Soule buried in Vicksburg MS

Charles was born about 1845 in Michigan, the son of Benjamin (1810-1876) and Alzina or Alvina (1816-1868) and the brother of Harrison Soule, born about 1842 in Michigan. Both men enlisted in the 3rd Michigan Infantry. (See his full biography.)


Charles was taken prisoner on November 30, 1863 at Mine Run, Virginia, and sent to Andersonville, Georgia. Charles was struck down by dysentery and admitted to the prison hospital on March 24, 1865 with chronic diarrhea. He was exchanged on March 26, and admitted to McPherson hospital in Vicksburg, Mississippi from Camp Parole on April 7. Charles died in the hospital on April 20, 1865 and was buried in Vicksburg National Cemetery: section I, grave 7429.


Note, the cemetery is laid out on a series of stepped hills and many of the sections -- arranged by letter and then sequential grave number -- are not clearly marked if at all. Also, you will need to go to the USS Cairo Museum to ask about specific burials. They can provide you with maps -- also not very good -- and give you the general sense of where to look.

P9570239.jpg

Photos of five 3rd Michigan men and one woman

I apologize for the poor quality but these were copied (xeroxed) with the photos (carte de visites) still in their plastic sleeves. I plan to return to reshoot with the images out of the sleeve.

Photos from collection no. 242 Grand Rapids Historical Collections, Grand Rapids Public Library.

Thomas Tate of Company I

Thomas Tate of Company I

Phebe Southard Tate, wife of Thomas

Phebe Southard Tate, wife of Thomas

Maj Gen Byron Root Pierce, began the war as captain of Company K, 3rd Michigan Infantry

Maj Gen Byron Root Pierce, began the war as captain of Company K, 3rd Michigan Infantry

Joshua R. Benson of Company G

Joshua R. Benson of Company G

Daniel Converse of Company D

Daniel Converse of Company D

Ernest Synold of Company E

Ernest Synold of Company E

Edward Morse buried in Garfield Park cemetery, Grand Rapids, Michigan

Now that I'm returning to Grand Rapids, one of my first projects is to rephotograph the gravesites of the men of the Old 3rd. The photos I took more than 20 years ago we limited in scope, quality and quantity. I hope to rectify that over the coming months.

whether I get around to posting all of the "reshoots" here or not remains to be seen -- I've already shot more than 600 images to date. But here's a sample of what I'm doing now, environment shots as well as multiple closeups:






Edward Stevens - updated 2/23/2017

Edward Stevens was born November 26, 1847, in Chipstead, Surrey, England, the son of James Stevens (1820-1902) and Caroline Smith (b. 1824).

James and Caroline were married on April 21, 1844, in Hampton Wick, Middlesex, England. Edward emigrated to the United States, probably with Richard Stapleton and Margaret Stevens, and numerous older siblings, arriving in New York City aboard the ship America on January 18, 1854. Edward eventually made his way west, settling in Barry County, Michigan. In 1850 there was a 43-year-old Edward Stevens living in Leroy, Calhoun County, Michigan, and one Edward Stevens living in China, St. Clair County.

Edward stood 5’2” with black eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion and was an 18-year-old farmer possibly living in Rutland, Barry County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company E on February 8, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Rutland, and was mustered the same day. He joined the Regiment on March 23, was on detached service in May, and probably still on detached service when he was transferred to Company E, 5th Michigan Infantry upon consolidation of the 3rd and 5th Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was absent sick from September through November, and mustered out presumably on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war Edward returned to Michigan, probably to Barry County.

He married Michigan native Harriet Maria Wilkins (1851-1927) on August 13, 1867, and they had at least 10 children: Robert (b. 1868), Albert (b. 1869), Mary Emma (b. 1870), George E. (1872-1945), Caroline (1874-1956), Jennie (b. 1875), Ormond S. (1878-1899), Kitty (1880-1903), Edith May (1884-1967, Mrs. Lucas), and Merle Jean (1887-1957).

By 1870 Edward was working as a farm laborer and living with his wife and son in Hope, Barry County. He eventually moved to the northern part of the state was living in Chase, Lake County in 1890 and 1894. He probably spent the rest of his life in Lake County. He was working as a blacksmith and living with his wife Harriet and daughter Merle in Chase, Lake County in 1900. By 1910 Edward was working as a farmer and living with his wife Harriet, their daughter Merle and granddaughter Merle Wyman in Chase. He and Harriet were still living in Chase in 1920. By 1930 Edward was a widower living in Chase; his daughter Edith, a cook in a clubhouse, was also living with him.

In 1887 he applied for and received a pension (no. 1112104).

Edward was a widower when he died of a heart attack on September 11, 1934, in Chase, Lake County and was buried in Chase Township Cemetery.

 Many thanks to Kirby Stevens for pointing me to Edward's listing on Familysearch.org!

James W. Sims - update 2/14/2017

James W. Sims was born in 1817, in New Jersey.

James married New York native Mary Lewis (1817-1870) and they had at least four children: Emma (1844-1921, Mrs. Konkle), James Larie (1848-1866), Emily Arvilla (b. 1850) and William L. (1853-1885).

By 1846 James and his wife had settled in Michigan, and by 1850 James was working as a magistrate and living with his wife and children in Plainfield, Kent County. In 1860 he was working as a lawyer and living with his wife and four children in Plainfield.

James was 44 years old and probably living in Kent County when he enlisted in (but was never mustered into service) in the 3rd Michigan.

Instead, James enlisted in Company F, 14th Michigan Infantry on December 17, 1861, at Grand Rapids, and was mustered on January 7, 1862. He was a hospital attendant from June through August, in September he was assigned to the hospital at Tuscambia, Alabama as of August 29, 1862, and he was at Tuscambia in October. In January of 1863 James was detached to the hospital in Knoxville, Tennessee through April of 1863.

He died of disease at Nashville, Tennessee, on February 28, 1864. His body was apparently returned to Michigan and he was buried in Plainfield cemetery, Kent County: 1-52.

In May of 1864 his widow Mary applied for and received a pension (no. 28687). She is buried in Plainfield cemetery, Kent County: 1-52-4.
William

Lavie

Mary

Family plot it's likley that the father James W. is buried in the open space next to his wife Mary